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This should be simple. Yet, it's giving me Hell.

Problem
I have compiled the latest kernel and when I reboot my box, it generates a kernel panic related to the filesystem.

Question
How do I get the new kernel to recognize the VMWare filesystem? There must be some setting somewhere that lets the Linux installation know that the "hard drive" is not really a drive but actually a file that represents a virtual machine.

Background
First and foremost, I am no Linux guru. This is my first time compiling the kernel. What I've done to get this problem:

  • Downloaded kernel version 2.6.34 from kernel.org
  • Unpacked the source into a directory
  • Followed the installation instructions here:
  • http://www.cyberciti.biz/tips/compiling-linux-kernel-26.html
  • Basically, ran: make menuconfig, make, make modules, make modules_install, make install, reboot
  • I didn't really change anything in the make menuconfig section

Upon reboot, it failed with an error along the lines of:

No volume groups found
Volume group "VolGroup00" not found
Unable to access resume device (/dev/VolGroup00/LogVol01)
mount: could not find filesystem '/dev/root'
setuproot: moving /dev failed: No such file or directory
setuproot: error mounting /proc: No such file or directory
setuproot: error mounting /sys: No such file or directory
switchroot: mount failed: No such file or directory
Kernel panic - not syncing: Attempted to kill init!

Environment
I am running Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server (2.6.18-194.3.1.el5PAE) under VMWare Fusion Version 3.1.0 (261058) running on a MacBook Pro with OS X v10.5.8 running a 2.8 GHz Intel Core Duo processor with 4GB 1067 MHz DDR3 memory. The virtual machine is allocated 2 processor cores and 2048 MB of memory. The VM hard disk setting points to the file "Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.vmdk" with "Bus Type" set to "SCSI", "Disk Size" set to 40Gb and "Split into 2Gb Files" option checked.

When I use the following /boot/grub/menu.lst file, everything works perfectly except that it boots into the wrong kernel (2.6.18-194.3.1.el5PAE instead of 2.6.34):

# grub.conf generated by anaconda
#
# Note that you do not have to rerun grub after making changes to this file
# NOTICE:  You have a /boot partition.  This means that
#          all kernel and initrd paths are relative to /boot/, eg.
#          root (hd0,0)
#          kernel /vmlinuz-version ro root=/dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00
#          initrd /initrd-version.img
#boot=/dev/sda
default=1
timeout=5
splashimage=(hd0,0)/grub/splash.xpm.gz
hiddenmenu
title Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server (2.6.34)
    root (hd0,0)
    kernel /vmlinuz-2.6.34 ro root=/dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00 rhgb quiet
    initrd /initrd-2.6.34.img
title Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server (2.6.18-194.3.1.el5PAE)
    root (hd0,0)
    kernel /vmlinuz-2.6.18-194.3.1.el5PAE ro root=/dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00 rhgb quiet
    initrd /initrd-2.6.18-194.3.1.el5PAE.img
title Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server (2.6.18-194.el5PAE)
    root (hd0,0)
    kernel /vmlinuz-2.6.18-194.el5PAE ro root=/dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00 rhgb quiet
    initrd /initrd-2.6.18-194.el5PAE.img

When I use the following file (with the last lines commented out and a couple other small edits), it attempts to boot the correct kernel but the boot fails with the kernel panic described above:

# grub.conf generated by anaconda
#
# Note that you do not have to rerun grub after making changes to this file
# NOTICE:  You have a /boot partition.  This means that
#          all kernel and initrd paths are relative to /boot/, eg.
#          root (hd0,0)
#          kernel /vmlinuz-version ro root=/dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00
#          initrd /initrd-version.img
#boot=/dev/sda
default=1
timeout=5
splashimage=(hd0,0)/grub/splash.xpm.gz
hiddenmenu
title Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server (2.6.34)
    root (hd0,0)
    kernel /vmlinuz-2.6.34 ro root=/dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00 rhgb quiet
    initrd /initrd-2.6.34.img
    savedefault
    boot
#title Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server (2.6.18-194.3.1.el5PAE)
#   root (hd0,0)
#   kernel /vmlinuz-2.6.18-194.3.1.el5PAE ro root=/dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00 rhgb quiet
#   initrd /initrd-2.6.18-194.3.1.el5PAE.img
#title Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server (2.6.18-194.el5PAE)
#   root (hd0,0)
#   kernel /vmlinuz-2.6.18-194.el5PAE ro root=/dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00 rhgb quiet
#   initrd /initrd-2.6.18-194.el5PAE.img

I don't understand how, in one case, it can figure out VMWare's filesystem just fine while in the other case, it cannot. What am I missing? Is there some special VMWare-related compile option I should be choosing? Is there something on the VMWare Fusion side that I need to change? I can't figure this out!

Any and all suggestions are greatly appreciated!

share|improve this question
    
this has nothing to do with VMware for sure. try to see your .config under source tree to check if CONFIG_BLK_DEV_LOOP=y is there or not ? This has nothing to do with VMware file system. the kernel generates the file and it knows which file system will work. also, use installkernel command to install the kernel and then edit the entry in grub's config menu.lst file – Ramadheer Singh Jul 9 '10 at 8:41
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your kernel is probably unable to load the modules needed to locate your volumes.

My best guess is your initrd is not in the right place. It needs to be in the same directory as the installed kernel.

Also, it's not a good idea to follow Debian instructions for a RedHat system. In general it's ok, but you are doing something that is relatively distribution specific.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your response. In the /boot directory, there are initrd img files for each kernel. So I'm guessing the issue lies elsewhere? Your comment makes me wonder if there is some type of VMWare module I need to install that exists in the other kernels. I'll start looking into that (or at least trying to!) – gmale Jul 8 '10 at 7:38
    
Regarding the tutorial, it was one of the better ones I could find dealing with the 2.6 kernel and since the intro stated, "instructions remains the same for any other distribution except for apt-get command" I went with it (using yum for all the apt-get sections). I'd GLADLY follow a redhat tutorial, if I could find a decent one covering 2.6. All the ones I came across were either for 2.4 or RedHat 8/9 (instead of Enterprise 5) or Fedora and they didn't work properly. – gmale Jul 8 '10 at 7:44
    
Do you see any indications of SCSI modules starting up? – James Roth Jul 8 '10 at 13:57

I had a similar problem.

The kernel was much older than hardware. Hard drive was attached by SATA default. I reconfigured (in BIOS or in VM.Properties) hardware to connect by IDE. It worked for me, i'm happy :)

share|improve this answer

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