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I'm teaching myself C# and am doing my first project. I would like to use Linq to query a bus schedule, so that at any time I can get the next 5 bus arrival times. How can I limit my query to the first 5 results?

More generally, how can I take a slice of a list in C#? (In Python I would use mylist[:5] to get the first 5 elements.)

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3 Answers 3

up vote 240 down vote accepted
var firstFiveItems = myList.Take(5);

Or to slice:

var secondFiveItems = myList.Skip(5).Take(5);

And of course often it's convenient to get the first five items according to some kind of order:

var firstFiveArrivals = myList.OrderBy(i => i.ArrivalTime).Take(5);
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22  
Does it throw exception if there are only, for example, 3 items in the list? Or will it take as many as there are up to 5? –  bobek Feb 22 '12 at 21:08
22  
@bobek : It does not throw an exception. It simply returns what it has if there aren't enough elements. –  Joshua Pech Sep 19 '12 at 4:15

In case anyone is interested (even if the question does not ask for this version), in C# 2 would be: (I have edited the answer, following some suggestions)

myList.Sort(CLASS_FOR_COMPARER);
List<string> fiveElements = myList.GetRange(0, 5);
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Maybe add an anonymous predicate as well? –  AlexeyMK Nov 26 '08 at 8:33
    
List<T>.Sort returns void; you would need to sort, then use GetRange separately. You could also use a Comparison<T> anonymous method to remove the need for CLASS_FOR_COMPARER. –  Marc Gravell Nov 26 '08 at 8:39
    
@AlexeyMK - you mean a Comparison<T>, not a predicate (Predicate<T>) - a predicate is used to filter data –  Marc Gravell Nov 26 '08 at 8:40

To take first 5 elements better use expression like this one:

var firstFiveArrivals = myList.Where([EXPRESSION]).Take(5);

or

var firstFiveArrivals = myList.Where([EXPRESSION]).Take(5).OrderBy([ORDER EXPR]);

It will be faster than orderBy variant, because LINQ engine will not scan trough all list due to delayed execution, and will not sort all array.

class MyList : IEnumerable<int>
{

    int maxCount = 0;

    public int RequestCount
    {
        get;
        private set;
    }
    public MyList(int maxCount)
    {
        this.maxCount = maxCount;
    }
    public void Reset()
    {
        RequestCount = 0;
    }
    #region IEnumerable<int> Members

    public IEnumerator<int> GetEnumerator()
    {
        int i = 0;
        while (i < maxCount)
        {
            RequestCount++;
            yield return i++;
        }
    }

    #endregion

    #region IEnumerable Members

    System.Collections.IEnumerator System.Collections.IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    #endregion
}
class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var list = new MyList(15);
        list.Take(5).ToArray();
        Console.WriteLine(list.RequestCount); // 5;

        list.Reset();
        list.OrderBy(q => q).Take(5).ToArray();
        Console.WriteLine(list.RequestCount); // 15;

        list.Reset();
        list.Where(q => (q & 1) == 0).Take(5).ToArray();
        Console.WriteLine(list.RequestCount); // 9; (first 5 odd)

        list.Reset();
        list.Where(q => (q & 1) == 0).Take(5).OrderBy(q => q).ToArray();
        Console.WriteLine(list.RequestCount); // 9; (first 5 odd)
    }
}
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13  
Except that you're now ordering only the first 5 elements after you've selected them. It may be faster, but it also has different semantics, which are less likely to be what people actually want to achieve. –  Greg Beech Nov 26 '08 at 9:01
1  
+1 to Greg's comment - taking and then ordering is almost always the wrong approach, IMO. –  Jon Skeet Nov 26 '08 at 9:18
    
I think it depends on what you want for the result, it's not a simple black or white question. –  Alan Feng Dec 6 '13 at 10:27

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