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Is it possible in C++ to define BIT0, BIT1, BIT2 in another way in C++ without using #define?

#define BIT0 0x00000001
#define BIT1 0x00000002
#define BIT2 0x00000004

I then take the same thing and make states out of those bits:

#define MOTOR_UP   BIT0
#define MOTOR_DOWN BIT1

Note: I am using 32 bits only, not 64 bits. I am also using a setBit(flagVariable, BIT) (consequently a clrBit macro to do the opposite) macro to set the bits then compare whether the bit is set using the bitwise operator such as

if (flagVariable & MOTOR_UP) { 
   // do something
   clrBit(flagVariable, MOTOR_UP);
}

Is there a type in C++ that already contains these bit masks?

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1  
I'm curious about your numbering scheme - I understand Bit0 being the least significant bit, but why is Bit1 the 3rd least significant bit, and Bit2 the 4th? Either you're missing 0x00000002 or you have a very inconsistent and confusing practice. –  Eclipse Jul 8 '10 at 1:09
    
Example is jacked.. fixed –  user195488 Jul 8 '10 at 1:59
    
I am curious at why this is defined with macros. It's very bad practice to use #define for constants in C++ code. –  Matthieu M. Jul 8 '10 at 6:34
    
setBit is a macro which sets the bit and clrBit clears the bit. The code was ported from C a long time ago. –  user195488 Jul 8 '10 at 11:07
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10 Answers 10

up vote 6 down vote accepted

How about:

enum Bits
{
    BIT0    = 0x00000001,
    BIT1    = 0x00000004,
    BIT2    = 0x00000008,

    MOTOR_UP    = BIT0,
    MOTOR_DOWN  = BIT1
};
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So BIT0 is turned into an int as per the C++ spec for enums? –  user195488 Jul 8 '10 at 12:39
1  
Its not turned into an int. It is represented on the system as an int. But that should not really make any difference to you. The integral promotion rules will convert it to the correct type depending on the usage context. –  Loki Astari Jul 8 '10 at 13:24
1  
<obscure><arcane>BIT0 is actually an int inside the {}, and an Bits value outside.</arcane></obscure> –  MSalters Jul 8 '10 at 13:39
    
@Martin: Is there an advantage to declaring MOTOR_UP or MOTOR_DOWN inside the enum? –  user195488 Jul 12 '10 at 17:18
    
@Changeling: It keeps all the bit flags in one place thus makes maintainableity easier. –  Loki Astari Jul 12 '10 at 18:11
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You could use an enum instead:

enum {
  BIT1 = 1,
  BIT2 = 2,
  BIT3 = 4,
  ...
};
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9  
§7.2/4 says: "It is implementation-defined which integral type is used as the underlying type for an enumeration except that the underlying type shall not be larger than int unless the value of an enumerator cannot fit in an int or unsigned int." –  Georg Fritzsche Jul 8 '10 at 0:10
    
I removed that note now. Don't forget that you can always edit your answer to fix invalid facts. –  Georg Fritzsche Jul 9 '10 at 1:43
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How about using a template?

template <int BitN>
struct bit
{
    static const int value = (1 << BitN);
}

You would use it thus:

const int MOTOR_UP   = bit<0>::value;
const int MOTOR_DOWN = bit<1>::value;

Or with an enum:

enum
{
    MOTOR_UP   = bit<0>::value,
    MOTOR_DOWN = bit<1>::value
}
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The value is available at compile time so there's no reason why the enum wouldn't work. –  Grant Peters Jul 8 '10 at 5:31
    
@Grant Peters: I'm overly cautious when I answer questions without access to a compiler ;) –  Cogwheel Jul 8 '10 at 13:49
1  
Well, what's the point? bit<N>::value isn't more expressive than (1<<N) IMO –  peterchen Jul 8 '10 at 13:55
    
@peterchen: that's more applicable to the original question than it is to my answer (and it's equally applicable to most of the other answers here). That being said, I disagree with the assertion that it isn't any more expressive than the raw expression. Just the presence of the word "bit" makes it marginally more understandable to someone less-than-familiar with bit shift operations. –  Cogwheel Jul 8 '10 at 14:03
    
I agree that it's a valid replacement - a bit overblown, though (pardon the pun). I just wondered why one would pick that over an enum. -- regarding obviousness, I'd expect most working with hardware to pick up on the "1<<N", or even bit constants. Otherwise, a comment fixes that. –  peterchen Jul 8 '10 at 14:10
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Here's one way:

const int bit0 = (1<<0);
const int bit1 = (1<<1);
const int bit2 = (1<<2);
//...

const int motor_up = bit0;
const int motor_down = bit1;
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You could use a function instead:

#define BIT(n) (1<<(n))

*edited for Macro Monster compliance

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1  
Does the question not say without #define? –  Billy ONeal Jul 8 '10 at 0:05
1  
@Billy: 'course, but I figured the intent was to avoid having to do 32 #define BITs manually, which this does just fine. –  tzaman Jul 8 '10 at 0:07
1  
Ah... if that's what he intends than the question is written very poorly lol. –  Billy ONeal Jul 8 '10 at 0:09
8  
Macro Monster say, "me need more parens!": #define BIT(n) (1 << (n)) –  Michael Burr Jul 8 '10 at 0:37
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I say combine tzaman's and Martin York's answers:

#define BIT(x) (1 << (x))

enum {
    motor_up = BIT(0),
    motor_down = BIT(1)
};

There's no particular reason for a bunch of macros or enums with silly-names like BIT0, BIT1, ..., BITn.

And enums work great as integral constants - they don't have macro global-namespace-stomping powers and they work equally well in C and C++ (which isn't true for const int types).

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You probably want something like the STL's std::bitset.

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bitset is a bad way to go. you can not give symbolic names to the individual bit fields. –  jyoung Jul 8 '10 at 0:18
1  
@JYoung: You can't give symbolic names to half the other answers here either. At least with bitset you're not manually twiddling bits. –  Billy ONeal Jul 8 '10 at 0:20
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http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_43_0/libs/utility/utility.htm#BOOST_BINARY

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Err... that also uses #define. You've just hidden it away in a header. –  Billy ONeal Jul 8 '10 at 0:08
    
@bill sure, I assumed poster did not want to write his own macros. –  Anycorn Jul 8 '10 at 0:15
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Use bitfield union and structs. (For Billy: The solution to the problem is C++ code. The sample was using C++/CLI.)

union MotorControl
{
    struct 
    {
        int motorUp :1;
        int motorDown :1;
    };
    struct 
    {
        int all;
    };
};

int main(array<System::String ^> ^args)
{
    MotorControl mc;
    mc.all = 0;
    mc.motorDown = 1;
}
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2  
-1 for: That's not C++. Make it C++ and I'll remove my downvote. –  Billy ONeal Jul 8 '10 at 0:14
    
Oh -- that's also not portable endian-wise. I'd not downvote for that but thought I'd mention it. –  Billy ONeal Jul 8 '10 at 0:16
1  
Do not listen to Billy, this is C++ code. I use this in embedded C++ projects all the time. When you are working with hardware, (like motor control) porting to other endian hardware is usually not an issue. –  jyoung Jul 8 '10 at 0:22
1  
@Jyoung: No, that is C++/CLI. C++/CLI is not C++. Your code with the unions and structs is actually correct. main is wrong. –  Billy ONeal Jul 8 '10 at 0:24
3  
Anonymous structs aren't valid standard C++ either. –  Georg Fritzsche Jul 8 '10 at 0:31
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I'd modify Martin's answer just a bit:

enum Bits
{
    BIT0    = 0x00000001,
    BIT1    = BIT0 << 1, 
    BIT2    = BIT1 << 1,

    MOTOR_UP    = BIT0,
    MOTOR_DOWN  = BIT1
};

Using the shift operators makes things a little more consistent, and makes it obvious if you are skip a bit.

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This is out of date with the current question, the OP just made a typo –  Grant Peters Jul 8 '10 at 5:34
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