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I've seen mention of the Oracle WITH clause a few times around here for aliasing a subquery like this:

WITH myData AS (SELECT id, text FROM SomeTable)
SELECT myData from SomeOtherTable

Does any version of SQL Server support this? If not, is there a particular reason they don't? Performance? Potential for incorrect usage?

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4  
BTW, note that this is not so much "Oracle-like" as "ANSI-SQL-like". – John Saunders Jul 8 '10 at 4:00
    
Really? Would you happen to know where I can find a copy of the actual ANSI-SQL Standard? – Stephen Collins Jul 10 '10 at 19:06
up vote 5 down vote accepted

SQL Server 2005 and up.

I wanted to add that you can stack these to good effect:

WITH A AS (
    SELECT * FROM X
), B AS (
    SELECT * FROM A
), C AS (
    SELECT * FROM B
)
SELECT * FROM C

You can even do:

WITH A AS (
), B AS (
)
SELECT * FROM A INNER JOIN B ON whatever

Also note that WITH must be the first keyword in a statement, so you often see it written as:

;WITH A AS (
)

Which basically terminates the previous statement (semicolons are kind of optional in T-SQL)

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Cool, did not know this! – harpo Jul 8 '10 at 3:54

Yes SQL2005 and SQL2008 both support this. They are called Common Table Expressions.

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...and a lovely concept to bend your head with when trying to master the recursive CTE! – spender Jul 8 '10 at 1:06
    
Yes, but actually the recursive CTE is not that bad once you've written a few. It's way better than the alternatives (such as they are). – harpo Jul 8 '10 at 3:53

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