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So- I've got this ajax request, see-. Blonde, about 6 feet tall, looks like this:

$.ajax({
    url: 'http://example.com/makeThing',
    dataType: 'html',
    type: 'POST',
    data: {
        something:someotherthing
    },
    complete: function(request, status) {
        console.log("headers=" + request.getAllResponseHeaders(););
    }
});

What happens is that the request to '/makeThing' returns a 302 redirect to a second url:'getThing/abc123'. All I want to do is find out what that second url is (programmatically- it'll be different every time, so just checking in firebug doesn't help me). I've tried plumbing the response headers that come back to the 'complete' callback, but that just gives me what came back on the second request.

Constraints: -I have no control over the server this is running on- just the js. -Can switch frameworks if I have to (dojo? prototype?)

Ideally, I'd do some sort of header-only request to /makeThing to find out what the redirect url is by getting just the headers of the initial 302 response.

Failing that (since jquery auto-follows redirects and doesn't seem to have a way to step in between the requests), I get retrieve the final response and use it to somehow get the url from... something? The request object, maybe?

TLDR: Sending an ajax request. Framework auto-follows the resulting 302 redirect. How do I figure out where it redirected to?

EDIT, Clarification: The final url will be different every time- calling 'makeThing' causes the server to create what is thereafter hosted at 'getThing/abc123'

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Check it with Firebug. –  Gert Grenander Jul 8 '10 at 1:59

5 Answers 5

If possible, have your server set a header on those pages (the destination pages, not the redirecting one), for example set a "current-location" header, then you can do this:

$.ajax({
    url: 'http://example.com/makeThing',
    dataType: 'html',
    type: 'POST',
    data: {
        something:someotherthing
    },
    complete: function(request, status) {
        var location = request.getResponseHeader("current-location");
    }
});

Yes, this is a bit hacky, but since the redirect is handled internally in the XmlHttpRequest object (an event to which you can't access), you don't have much choice.

You can check the spec, this is the intended behavior for XmlHttpRequest:

If the origin of the URL conveyed by the Location header is same origin with the XMLHttpRequest origin and the redirect does not violate infinite loop precautions, transparently follow the redirect while observing the same-origin request event rules.

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1  
That'd work if I had access to the server. :( All I can change is Javascript. –  Fishtoaster Jul 8 '10 at 13:11
2  
@Fishtoaster - AFAIK, You don't have any options then, this just isn't exposed, at least cross-browser. Can you read the content to figure out which page you're on, or some alternative approach? –  Nick Craver Jul 8 '10 at 13:34
    
That's probably what I'm going to have to do. Brittle, but I guess that's all there is. –  Fishtoaster Jul 8 '10 at 13:47

Why don't you just plug the URL 'http://example.com/makeThing' into your browser and see where you end up?

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The redirect might be dependent on the data - i.e. if it's valid -> redirect to next page. If it's invalid -> redirect to edit page. It also might act differently if it's an XHR instead of a regular request. This is not uncommon in Rails, for example. –  Jamie Wong Jul 8 '10 at 1:54
    
As mentioned in my correction, the final url will very on every request to makeThing. makeThing generates a 'thing' with id 'abc123' which is thereafter accessible at getThing/abc123. Hence why I need to access the thing programmatically. –  Fishtoaster Jul 8 '10 at 3:28

If you boot up firebug, then open the console, you can follow where the request is actually going. When you see the AJAX request has finished processing, expand that console item and you'll see the requests involved and any response headers.

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Sorry if I wasn't especially clear on this point: makeThing is a generator function- where it redirects to is different each time it's called, so I need a way to do this programmatically. –  Fishtoaster Jul 8 '10 at 3:00

This may not help your particular situation, but when I had the same problem I noticed the page I ended up on after the redirect had a clue in the HTML:

<meta property="og:url" content="THE_URL_OF_THE_PAGE" />

Some pages have script snippets in them used for adding Facebook commenting, and those can sometimes contain the current URL too. Or even as blatantly as this:

<a href="http://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=THE_URL_OF_THE_PAGE">
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That really is too bad that we can't grab that header... but as Magnus pointed out, you could try to read some unique content from that page which will let you determine which page was actually routed to you...

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