Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
try
{
  OpenConnection();
  RowsAffected = cmd.ExecuteNonQuery(); 
  CloseConnection(true); //should I use this function call here 
  //as well, when I am using it in finally 
  //block. For closing database connection.
}
catch (SqlException ex)
{ throw ex; }
finally
{ CloseConnection(true); }

Or Should I write it this way

try
{
  OpenConnection();
  RowsAffected = cmd.ExecuteNonQuery(); 
}
catch (SqlException ex)
{ throw ex; }
finally
{ CloseConnection(true); }
share|improve this question
2  
Do not use throw ex; as it will clear the stack trace. Use throw; instead. –  Oliver Hanappi Jul 8 '10 at 8:27
    
@Oliver Hanappi: you are right about that but in this case I wouldn't try to catch anything because just catching and rethrowing and exception without any additional logic doesn't provide any value. –  Sandor Drieënhuizen Jul 8 '10 at 8:30
    
To All: After looking out at your comments. I feel you could help me in my previous question as well. stackoverflow.com/questions/3201606/… I am reading articles on Exception Handling Mechanism and want to know design pattern for handling exception. It would be appreciable if you could help me in another question as well. –  Shantanu Gupta Jul 8 '10 at 8:35
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

No, the finally block gets always executed, regardless of the success or failure of the code in the try block. In your first example the connection would be closed twice on success.

You say that you are checking for the connection state so that means you don't get an exception when closing the connection twice. Still, I think it is more appropriate to try to close it only when necessary.

share|improve this answer
    
No means,Should not write in try block ? I am checking for conenction state before closing. –  Shantanu Gupta Jul 8 '10 at 8:22
    
@Shantanu Gupta: that's correct. –  Sandor Drieënhuizen Jul 8 '10 at 8:24
2  
Just a bit of trivia I came across recently - finally blocks do not always get called. See Environment.FailFast (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms131100.aspx) –  Chris McAtackney Jul 8 '10 at 8:37
    
@C.McAtackney: Nice touch. Speaking of exceptional circumstances: in versions of .NET prior to 2.0, a ThreadAbortException could abort the execution of a finally block. –  Sandor Drieënhuizen Jul 8 '10 at 8:50
add comment

In this particular example, you can in fact do this:

using (var conn = new SqlConnection(...)) {
    // Do work
}

What the compiler does with that statement is essentially:

SqlConnection conn;
try {
  conn = new SqlConnection(...)
} finally {
  conn.Dispose();
}

Or thereabouts... the finally block is always exected, ensuring that a using block always calls Dispose.

The downside of this approach is that you can't catch the SqlException that could be thrown, so you end up doing something like this:

try {
  using (var conn = new SqlConnection(...)) {
    // Do work.
  }
} catch (SqlException ex) {

}

But the compiled code ends up representing:

try {
  SqlConnection conn;
  try {
    conn = new SqlConnection(...);
  } finally {
    conn.Dispose();
  }
} catch (SqlException ex) {

}

To be honest though it probably won't make any difference performance wise, as anytime you throw an exception, its going to be a performance hit. It does ensure that Dispose is always called.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You should write in the second Way

                try 
                { 
                    OpenConnection(); 
                    RowsAffected = cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();  
                } 
                catch (SqlException ex) 
                { throw ex; } 
                finally 
                { CloseConnection(true); }
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your finally block is always getting executed. Using Close functions like Dispose(), CLose() should be using in finally block

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.