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In a delphi unit, I have a global record called 'Context':

interface
  type
    TContext = record
       ...
    end;

  var
    context: TContext;

I also have a initialization procedure in this unit, taking a context:

interface  
  procedure Init(AContext: TContext);

Inside the Init procedure, I try to assign the given context to the global context:

implementation
  procedure Init(AContext: TContext);
  begin
    context := AContext;
  end;

For some reason, the global context remains empty after the assignment. Why is that? Declaring a local variable inside the procedure, and assigning to it works as expected.


What I should have mentioned, is that this unit lives in a dll, and the init procedure is called from the exe. Declaring a global record, or declaring several global strings makes no difference. The assigned values are lost.

regards,
-Vegar

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3  
If you ctrl+click on the 'context' in procedure 'Init' the IDE should take you to the relevant context. –  Sertac Akyuz Jul 8 '10 at 9:08
1  
Regarding your update: IIUC the values that get "lost" are strings. Mixing strings and DLLs is always tricky. Do you use ShareMem, FastMM or something similar? –  Uli Gerhardt Jul 8 '10 at 10:18
1  
You haven't demonstrated how that function gets called in the EXE. What does that function declaration look like on the EXE side? –  Rob Kennedy Jul 8 '10 at 14:17

3 Answers 3

I guess you have to show a bit more code. With

unit Unit1;

interface

type
  TContext = record
    dummy: Integer;
  end;

var
  context: TContext;

procedure Init(AContext: TContext);

implementation

procedure Init(AContext: TContext);
begin
  context := AContext;
end;

end.

and

program Project1;

{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

uses
  Unit1 in 'Unit1.pas';

procedure Test;
var
  c: TContext;
begin
  c.dummy := 666;
  Init(c);
end;

begin
  Test;
end.

I get the expected result, i.e. c and Unit1.context both contain 666 after executing Init(c); in Test.

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I always find it hard to decide the right amount of code needed to illustrate a problem. Posting the complete picture are seldom an option. –  Vegar Jul 8 '10 at 19:11
    
Ugh... obviosly, it should be 42, not 666! :D –  Alexander Jul 26 '10 at 8:08
    
That's boring - everybody uses 42. :-) –  Uli Gerhardt Jul 26 '10 at 16:51
up vote 0 down vote accepted

The error is found. Everything was kind of a mess really.... It turned out that the object responsible for calling the init-method existed twice, and the unit containing the global variable existed both inside the dll and the exe project. For some reason, one of the instances of the calling class manipulated the global variable inside the exe and the other the one inside the dll, and both the developer and the debugger where tripped to a halt...

The code is part of some old, messy legacy code which we are trying to break apart and clean up. We really start to get the hang of the 'breaking'-part...

Thanks for the responses, and sorry for wasting your time.

regards, -Vegar

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Should you not change

procedure Init(AContext: TContext);

to

procedure Init(Var AContext: TContext);

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4  
No, because he inside Init he reads from AContext. But const (instead of var) might be a good idea. –  Uli Gerhardt Jul 8 '10 at 13:28
    
No. ----------- –  Andreas Rejbrand Jul 8 '10 at 13:29
    
He says he wants to change the global var context, but when using a local var it works –  DwrCymru Jul 8 '10 at 13:49
1  
Right. He says he wants to change the global variable, context. Don't you see in the code where the AContext parameter is used to assign a new value to the global context variable? The AContext parameter is not the problem. –  Rob Kennedy Jul 8 '10 at 14:16
1  
No! The assignment is a bitwise copy with or without the var. The difference is that with the var AContext were a reference to whatever was passed to Init. Without, it's a copy. –  Uli Gerhardt Jul 8 '10 at 15:33

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