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Unless it's not supposed to but I can't seem to get nth-child to acknowledge the class selector.

I have say 4 divs inside another div, all of various classes and ids. I need to select the first instance of a div with said class. For example:

#content .foo:nth-child(1) { margin-top: 0; }

And obviously again with first-child to get the same affect, but it doesn't affect any of the divs.

Now if I want to force it to work with that div I can do this:

#content .foo:nth-child(3) { margin-top: 0; }

It just so happens that it is the 3rd div in #content, which is pointless because I need to get the 1st instance of anything with that class.

<div id="content">  
  <div id="action-bar"> </div>
  <div id="message"> </div>
  <div class="table"> </div>
  <div class="clear"> </div>
</div>

Here's a sample of the HTML, I've tried nth-of-type as well like this:

#content .table:nth-of-type(1) { margin: 0 }

Again it only responds when I say nth-of-type(3).

EDIT:

I've set up a working example of the problem I'm having here: http://jsfiddle.net/aHwS8/

share|improve this question
    
Maybe you should show us the corresponding parts of your actual HTML document. –  Gumbo Jul 8 '10 at 12:56
    
@gumbo sure thing, i just edited it.. :) –  stuartc Jul 8 '10 at 13:17
    
But (at least in this example) you have just one element with the class table. –  Gumbo Jul 8 '10 at 16:12
    
@gumbo yes, but 'n' only responds to the number it is the in the container div, not what number it is in the list of .table. I think my understanding of these pseudo-selectors is a little off. @Jake described what I'm trying to do perfectly "o what you want is the first div with class .foo regardless of which child it is. But what this selector does is the first div if it also has class .foo" Gonna have to hit google again. Thanks for your help! –  stuartc Jul 9 '10 at 5:46
    
Yes, both :nth-of-type() and :nth-child() do only take the element type or only being an element at all into account when counting. –  Gumbo Jul 9 '10 at 6:42

3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Try the :nth-of-type() pseudo-selector instead:

#content .foo:nth-of-type(1) { margin-top: 0; }

Note that :nth-of-type() counts the elements with the same name. So .foo:nth-of-type(1) will not select the first element with the class foo but any first element that is the first in the list of elements grouped by the same name. If you have some document like this:

<div>
    <i class="foo">1</i><i>x</i><i class="foo">2</i>
    <b class="foo">3</b><b>x</b><b class="foo">4</b>
</div>

.foo:nth-of-type(1) will select the elements <i class="foo">1</i> and <b class="foo">3</b> as both are the first of its own type.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I tried got the same response, it responded to: #content .foo:nth-of-type(3) { margin-top: 0; } –  stuartc Jul 8 '10 at 12:31
    
It's kind of similar, it's like it's ignoring the .foo class and just selecting the divs –  stuartc Jul 8 '10 at 12:41
    
@stuartc: It does not ignore the class. .foo:nth-of-type(3) does only apply to those elements that have the class “foo” and are the third of its type (there are only 2 other siblings with the same element name before this element). –  Gumbo Jul 8 '10 at 12:55
2  
@Gumbo - In a sense, it does ignore the class. It seems to look at the element of that class, and then looks at all of other of that type regardless of their class. So it does use the class initially to find the element, but from there it doesn't seem to matter if the elements of that type have the class or not. –  norsewulf May 10 '13 at 21:05
    
It's true, just look at this example: jsfiddle.net/DK3zc It's ignoring the selector by attribute. –  Pedro Moreira Mar 31 '14 at 13:58

This is an old post but I ended up here seeking for an answer for similar problem. Perhaps this will help someone.

I had the following structure, wanting to select the n-th "foo"-div:

<body>
  <div class='container'>
    <div class='foo'></div>
  </div>
  <div class='container'>
     <div class='foo'></div>
  </div>
  <div class='container'>
     <div class='foo'></div>
  </div>
  <div class='container'>
     <div class='foo'></div>
  </div>
</body>

The trick was "go back" and select the parent element with repeated siblings, in this case .container and then select its child(ren):

.container:nth-of-type(3) .foo {
    styles here
}
share|improve this answer

I think you're using the wrong selector, try:

#content .foo:first-of-type { margin-top: 0; }
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I tried got the same response, it responded to: #content .foo:nth-of-type(3) { margin-top: 0; } –  stuartc Jul 8 '10 at 12:31
    
Hmm, I see - so what you want is the first div with class .foo regardless of which child it is. But what this selector does is the first div if it also has class .foo? From a quick google and look at the CSS3 Pseudo-Selectors I'm not sure this is possible. Sorry I couldn't be more help! –  Jake Jul 8 '10 at 14:36
    
Thanks for your help, despite not fixing my issue, I've learnt a lot about pseudo-selectors! :) thanks again! –  stuartc Jul 9 '10 at 5:47

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