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I would be happy to access any element of multi-dimensional hash-array by a shorter expression

h = {a: {b: 'c'}}

# default way
p h[:a][:b] # => "c"

# a nicer way
p h[:a,:b] # => "c"

# nice assignment
h[:a,:b] = 1
p h # => {:a=>{:b=>1}}

I realize that in this way one eliminates the possibility to have a hash key being an array.

{[:a,:b] => "c"}

Since it is quite rare situation, I would prefer to reduce number of [] in my expressions.

How can one achieve this?


Update

Ok, I wasn't clear. The problem is that I have tried to make custom [] and []= methods myself, but failed. Could you show me how such functionality can be implemented?

Multi-dimensional arrays

If you are looking for something similar for arrays, have a look on narray gem http://narray.rubyforge.org/

>> a = NArray.int(5,5)
=> NArrayint5,5: 
[ [ 0, 0, 0, 0, 0 ], 
  [ 0, 0, 0, 0, 0 ], 
  [ 0, 0, 0, 0, 0 ], 
  [ 0, 0, 0, 0, 0 ], 
  [ 0, 0, 0, 0, 0 ] ]
>> a[1,2]
=> 0
>> a[1,2]=1
=> 1
>> a
=> NArrayint5,5: 
[ [ 0, 0, 0, 0, 0 ], 
  [ 0, 0, 0, 0, 0 ], 
  [ 0, 1, 0, 0, 0 ], 
  [ 0, 0, 0, 0, 0 ], 
  [ 0, 0, 0, 0, 0 ] ]
>> a[1,0..4]=1
=> 1
>> a
=> NArrayint5,5: 
[ [ 0, 1, 0, 0, 0 ], 
  [ 0, 1, 0, 0, 0 ], 
  [ 0, 1, 0, 0, 0 ], 
  [ 0, 1, 0, 0, 0 ], 
  [ 0, 1, 0, 0, 0 ] ]
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5  
I would just use all the []s required. You'd confuse the hell out of anyone else looking at your code otherwise. –  DanSingerman Jul 8 '10 at 13:21
    
OK, I promise to keep this code for myself only, or to provide clear comments every time I use it. :) –  Andrei Jul 8 '10 at 13:28
    
@DanSingerman I wish there were bounties for comments. Yes. A thousand times yes. @Andrei Please don't redefine such a basic aspect of the language's syntax for the sake of an (arguably) "nicer" looking lookup. Anyone you work with (and you yourself in a few months) is only going to be thrown off. –  Telemachus Jul 8 '10 at 13:30
    
:) I understand your point very well. But don't worry, I will not show it to anyone except here. –  Andrei Jul 8 '10 at 13:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I have fixed my code, so now it works

class AutoHash < Hash
  def initialize *args
    super
    @update, @update_index = args[0][:update], args[0][:update_key] unless 
args.empty?
  end

    def [] key,*args
      if args.count > 0
        self[key][*args]
      else
        if self.has_key? key
          super key
        else
          AutoHash.new :update => self, :update_key => key
        end
      end
    end

    def []= *args
      v = args.pop
      k = args.shift
      if args.count > 0
        self[k][*args]= v
      else
        @update[@update_index] = self if @update and @update_index
        super k,v
      end
    end
end

Examples

a = AutoHash.new
a[:a][:b][:c] = 123
a[:a,:b,:c] = 321
p a # => {:a=>{:b=>{:c=>321}}}

If such definition is too confusing, then one could name the method differently (e.g. #path instead of redifining [])

h[:a][:b][:c] = 123
p h.path(:a,:b,:c) # => 123

h.path(:a,:b,:c)= 321
p h #=> {:a=>{:b=>{:c=>321}}}

mypath = [:a,:b,:c]
p h.path(mypath) #=> 321
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1  
There is a little typo: h.path(:a,:b:,:c)= 321 should be h.path(:a, :b, :c) = 321 –  Aurril Jul 9 '10 at 6:47
    
Thanks, Aurril! –  Andrei Jul 9 '10 at 16:47

If you really want something like this then Ruby allows you to implement custom versions of [] and []= on classes of your choice including the Hash class provided by the language. Use with care if modifying base classes

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