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Assume I have:

std::map<K, V1> m1;
std::multimap<K, V2> m2;

I would like to template by container type and by key/value type. The following isn't working however :/

template <typename T>
void do_something(T var)
{
  // do something
}

template <typename TContainer, typename TKey, typename TVal>
void func(const TContainer<TKey, TVal>& container)
{
  for (typename TContainer<TKey, TVal>::iterator it = container.begin(); it != container.end(); ++it)
  {
    do_something(it->second);
  }
}

And then call it with:

func(m1);
func(m2);
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I presume that do_something is a red herring, and that it's actually the Template Argument Deduction on func which is failing? The question as it is now is vaue and incomplete. –  MSalters Jul 8 '10 at 13:03
    
What's the problem, what's the compiler error, runtime error, etc? –  Drakosha Jul 8 '10 at 13:04
1  
"Standard practice" is to pass a pair of iterators to func and forget about the TContainer thing. This amounts in this case to calling std::for_each. –  Alexandre C. Jul 8 '10 at 13:09
    
@Alexandre: Absent lambda functions std::foreach() isn't all that helpful. Yes, you can use std lib's and boost's binders, but the former are clumsy to use and the latter come up with terrifying error messages whenever you do something wrong - both a sure way to scare off novices. If your compile supports lambda, however, std::foreach() is indeed the way to go. –  sbi Jul 8 '10 at 13:24
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5 Answers 5

Can't you just have a single template parameter?

template <typename Container>
void func(const Container & container)
{
    for (typename Container::iterator it = container.begin(); it != container.end(); ++it)
    {
        do_something(it->second);
    }
}

Or better, pass iterators to your function instead of a container:

template <typename ForwardIterator>
void func(ForwardIterator begin, ForwardIterator end)
{
    for (; begin != end; ++begin)
    {
        do_something(begin->second);
    }
}

If you really want a template template parameter, here is the syntax:

template <template <typename, typename> Container, typename TKey, typename TValue>
void func(const Container<TKey, TValue> & container);

However, this won't work for the STL container since they usually have more parameters than it seems; indeed, they often have parameters with default values, such as allocator, so your best bet is to use the idiomatic way of writing generic algorithm described above, i.e. deal with iterators instead of containers.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for both container::iterator AND passing iterators. –  Mark B Jul 8 '10 at 13:37
    
Your last example won't work, because std::map has more than two template arguments. See my answer. –  sbi Jul 8 '10 at 13:56
    
A bit of nitpicking: It would be more idiomatic to name the template parameter ForwardReadableIterator or ForwardIterator and to pass the iterators by value. –  Philipp Jul 8 '10 at 13:58
    
@Philipp: A "ForwardReadableIterator" would be an Input Iterator. However, since we don't know do_something() (it might take its argument per non-const reference), we don't know whether an Input Iterator suffices or a Forward Iterator is necessary. –  sbi Jul 8 '10 at 14:30
1  
It's because iterators are supposed to be cheap (often they amount to a simple pointer in release mode). However this isn't true when using filter_iterator and the like, so there is an open debate here. It would be great if the compiler could just use what's best depending on whether it's cheap to copy or not... –  Matthieu M. Jul 8 '10 at 16:54
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The reason this doesn't work is that std::map takes four template arguments:

template<class Key,
         class Value,
         class Predicate = std::less<Key>,
         class Allocator = std::allocator<pair<const Key, Value> > >
class map;

While you can omit the last two parameters for instantiating, you have to list them for template matching to work:

template < typename TKey, 
           typename TVal, 
           class TPr, 
           class TAl
           template<typename,typename,class,class> TContainer >
void func(const TContainer<TKey, TVal, TPr, TAl>& container)
{
  for (typename TContainer<TKey, TVal, TPr, TAl>::iterator it = container.begin(); it != container.end(); ++it)
  {
    do_something(it->second);
  }
}

That said, however, I wonder why you are bothering with this. The idiomatic way would be to pass iterators:

template <typename FwdIt>
void func(FwdIt begin, FwdIt end)
{
  while(begin != end) {
    do_something(begin->second);
    ++begin;
  }
}

This also allows you to pass in anything that's compatible:

void f(const std::vector< std::pair<int, std::string> >& v)
{
   func( v.begin(), v.end() );
}
share|improve this answer
1  
+1, much more acurate than Luc's. I would precise however that STL implementations are free to use supplementary template parameters, which is it's a bad idea to use such a scheme. When you want to pass a pure container, you just pass Container without any constraint, the instanciation will fail if the interface does not match, and that's all we care about. –  Matthieu M. Jul 8 '10 at 16:56
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Passing iterators, as suggested multiple times, is the standard way, but you might also harness Boost.Range:

#include <boost/range.hpp>

template<typename ForwardReadableRange>
void func(const ForwardReadableRange& range) {
  typedef typename boost::range_iterator<const ForwardReadableRange>::type InputIterator;
  for (InputIterator it = boost::begin(range); it != boost::end(range); ++it) {
    do_something(it->second);
  }
}

template<typename ForwardReadableWriteableRange>
void func(ForwardReadableWriteableRange& range) {
  typedef typename boost::range_iterator<ForwardReadableWriteableRange>::type ForwardIterator;
  for (ForwardIterator it = boost::begin(range); it != boost::end(range); ++it) {
    do_something(it->second);
  }
}

This allows the caller to pass anything that models ForwardReadable(Writeable)Range, e.g. containers or iterator pairs.

Of course this should be replaced by a DoSomethingWithSecond functor and for_each:

template<typename T, typename UnaryOp, typename Result>
struct DoSomethingWithSecond: std::unary_function<T, Result> {
  UnaryOp op;
  explicit DoSomethingWithSecond(UnaryOp op): op(op) { }
  Result operator()(T value) {
    return op(value.second);
  }
};
template<typename T>
void func(T range) {
  boost::for_each(range, DoSomethingWithSecond(do_something));
}
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Try this, you don't need to specify that the container is templated on key and value types (note that the code is the same for any of those types), the compiler will generate an error if the passed type does not satisfy the contract. Currently the contract is "has iterator", "has begin", "has end" and "the iterator has second".

template <typename T>
void do_something(T var)  // Also consider "const T&"
{
  // do something
} 

template <typename TContainer>
void func(const TContainer& container)
{
  for (typename TContainer::iterator it = container.begin();
       it != container.end(); ++it)
  {
    do_something(it->second);
  }
}
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I would definitely suggest the following approach. I dislike templating on the container, for a lot of reasons, so let's template on iterators. A cumbersome, but generic approach is the following:

#include <algorithm>
#include <functional>

// This should be part of the standard, but it isn't.
template <typename Func1, typename Func2>
struct composer :
    std::unary_function
        <
            typename Func2::argument_type,
            typename Func1::result_type
        >
{
    composer(Func1 f1_ = Func1(), Func2 f2_ = Func2())
        : f1(f1_), f2(f2_)
    {}

    typename Func1::result_type 
    operator()(typename Func2::argument_type x)
    { return f1(f2(x)); }

private:
    Func1 f1; Func2 f2;
};


template <typename F1, typename F2>
composer<F1, F2> compose(F1 f1, F2 f2)
{ return composer<F1, F2>(f1, f2); }


template <class C, typename T, T C::*ptr>
struct mem_ptr : std::unary_function<C&, T&>
{ T& operator()(C& x) { return x::*ptr; } };


template <typename Iter>
void func(Iter begin, Iter end)
{
    typedef typename Iter::value_type pair_t;

    typedef mem_ptr
    <
        pair_t,
        pair_t::second_type,
        pair_t::&second
    > second_of;

    std::for_each(begin, end, compose(ptr_fun(do_something), ptr_mem));
}

The utility function compose and the class mem_ptr are stuff which should have been implemented in the standard (they may be in TR1 though). Note that you can template on the type of do_something, and you can even pass do_something as an argument.

Note that ptr_mem can be improved to something you can call like

ptr_mem(pair_t::&second)

but this would involve some more code. There may be some useful things in Boost, but here we can content with a 20-line approach.

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