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It'd be nice if I could define a method like this:

public T GetItem<T>() where T : null
{
    if (someCondition<T>())
        return someCalculation<T>();
    else
        return null;
}

Then I could use this on reference types (e.g., object, string) as well as nullable value types (e.g., int?, double?): anything that can be assigned to null. But this isn't possible.

Then again, for all I know, maybe it is? I know there'a no null constraint like I just fantasized about; but is there some workaround or clever way of accomplishing this that just hasn't occurred to me?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I used to never use output parameters, partly I think the syntax just felt clumsy. However, a few years ago I started using them more and they've become a common aspect of the code that I write.

I think this is the kind of function where I would really consider writing the function with an output parameter and a boolean return type, as shown below:

public bool GetItem<T>(out T value)
{
    if (someCondition<T>())
    {
        value = someCalculation<T>();
        return true;
    }
    else
    {
        value = default(T);
        return false;
    }
}

With this approach there is no need to restrict your generic parameter to reference type or a nullable type.

As I mentioned above, I originally felt that output parameter syntax was clumsy, but after I really started using it frequently I felt that the code that consumed my functions with output parameters was actually more accurate towards representing the problem that I was trying to solve, if that makes any sense.

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I do this quite a bit myself as well. I suppose this is a fairly close alternative that captures the spirit of what I'm asking about, so +1. –  Dan Tao Jul 8 '10 at 14:22
    
Since it seems this ends up being the most sensible pattern for this problem (in my opinion, anyway -- I know there are a lot of out parameter naysayers out there), I'm going to go ahead and accept this answer. –  Dan Tao Jul 22 '10 at 15:07

Personally, I would create two overloaded generic methods: one that accepts reference types and another that accepts nullable value types. Then you'll be able to call with either kind of parameter.

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Yeah, I do this quite a bit as well. But this requires giving the methods different names, which is frustrating. –  Dan Tao Jul 8 '10 at 14:23

It would depend on the generic usage in the someCondition and someCalculation methods. But this sounds like where the 'default' keyword could be used.

return default(T);
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Well, I'm concerned with scenarios where I would want to be able to distinguish success from failure on the basis of the return value being null or not. With int, for example, default(int) is just 0, which could be a valid return value for a huge variety of functions. –  Dan Tao Jul 8 '10 at 14:21
    
@Dan, that situation makes sense. I would probably follow the TryParse pattern --even though I despise output variables. I assumed you were well aware of the 'default' so my answer was pretty silly. –  Jerod Houghtelling Jul 8 '10 at 15:00

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