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I need to obtain the supplement of an angle.

Exactly what I need to do is to implement some kind of code that mirror the angle, let's say, I have 45 degrees -> 135, another example: 80 ->100, 0 degrees -> 180, and so on.

Solved: I implemented this just a moment ago, and it worked perfectly, I use 180 - angle if angle < 180, and 360 - angle if angle >= 180.

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1  
You mean 80 -> 100 ? –  quantumSoup Jul 8 '10 at 13:18
    
Yes :) 6 more to go. –  Artemix Jul 8 '10 at 14:27

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think you're after 180 - yourAngle.

Your examples:

  • 45 degrees: 180 - 45 = 135
  • 80 degrees: 180 - 80 = 100
  • 0 degrees: 180 - 0 = 180
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Yes, that worked ok but, what if my angle is 225?, if I do that then I'll get 180 - 225 = -45, and I should get 135. Maybe I should use 360 - angle if my angle is > 180. –  Artemix Jul 8 '10 at 14:50
    
@Artemix: So normalize the angle between 0 and 180 (by adding/subtraction 180 until you are between [0, 180) ) –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Jul 8 '10 at 18:14
    
Yes, I know that, but I'm asking if am'I correct if I do 360 - myAngle when myAngle > 180. –  Artemix Jul 8 '10 at 20:22
1  
@Artemix: you are doing your arithmetic mod 180, so adding 360 is the same as adding 180. That is, (360-angle) mod 180 = (180-angle) mod 180 = (-angle) mod 180. Here I am using mod in the mathematical sense, where (-1 mod 180) = 179, not +1. Thus, even multiplying your angle by -1 and adding/subtracting 180 until you are between [0, 180) will give you a correct answer. –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Jul 9 '10 at 16:38

Subtraction will probably work (if the universe is Euclidean).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supplementary_angles

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reflected_angle = 180 - ray_angle
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The simplest answer, based on what you appear to be asking about is

angle2 = 180 - angle1
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If you view your "angle" as a 2D vector in the plane, you simply change the sign of the component normal to the "mirror" plane.

So, for example, a 45 degree angle (1, 1) "mirrored" in the yz-plane becomes (-1, 1).

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Yes, that was EXACTLY what I thought in the first place, but when I tryied to do that on the code, I found some problems. Thing is, I didnt find a way to "reconstruct" the angle using the new components. –  Artemix Jul 9 '10 at 13:38
    
Post your code, because this is exactly correct. The problem was in your code. –  duffymo Jul 10 '10 at 16:52
    
If you've accepted the answer, why not vote it up as well? –  duffymo Jul 12 '10 at 15:39

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