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My small startup is planning to start development of an android app in september. My CEO wants to register the name for the app beforehand. Is it possible to do so?

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What's the name? Haha j/k. As far as I can tell, the market is a free for all. You can publish an app with your desired java package name such as "com.mycompany.myappname" and reserve that package name for yourself. However the title of the app is a gray area. You may have some limited traction with a (tm) or (c) but even then, enforcing it on the market probably wouldn't be worth your time/$. I'm going to Favorite this question however because I am very interested in other perspectives. –  Brad Hein Jul 8 '10 at 14:50
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I went down that path - In the end, it was impossible to justify the costs of 1. making the patent and 2. enforcing it. When you add together points 1 and 2, you arrive at a dollar figure that far exceeds the profit of 99% of apps on the market. With that said, I agree - do it if you're confident enough :) –  Brad Hein Jul 8 '10 at 14:53
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My guess is that uour CEO thinks app names are unique on the Android Market (which they are not). Only the package name is unique and there really is no use to reserve that as it's based on your domain and never shown to the user anyways. –  alexanderblom Jul 8 '10 at 14:57
    
Right. The package name can be just about anything you dream up, not necessarily your domain. com.foo.bar would be accepted too. –  Brad Hein Jul 8 '10 at 15:16
    
Wow you guys are awesome! Thank you so much for your answers! –  Gary Haran Jul 8 '10 at 15:26
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up vote 7 down vote accepted
  • You can publish an app with your desired java package name such as "com.mycompany.myappname" to reserve that package name for yourself (you own it by way of your market certificate). However the title of the app is a gray area. You may have some limited traction with a (tm) or (c) but even then, enforcing it on the market probably wouldn't be worth your time/$.

  • Patent: I went down that path - In the end, it was impossible to justify the costs of 1. making the patent and 2. enforcing it. When you add together points 1 and 2, you arrive at a dollar figure that far exceeds the profit of 99% of apps on the market. With that said, I agree - do it if you're confident enough :)

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Huh? Patents and application names aren't even slightly related. –  James Moore Jul 12 '11 at 22:47
    
Not true. You can protect the name of your product. The product is a patent and its name as well. –  sandalone Oct 16 '12 at 12:56
    
@JamesMoore I think he meant copyright –  Dheeraj Bhaskar Feb 14 '13 at 20:08
    
@sandalone a product's name is not part of its functionality or process –  Dheeraj Bhaskar Feb 14 '13 at 20:08
    
@DheeB As I said, you can protect legally your product name. Even if it's mobile app. –  sandalone Feb 15 '13 at 18:52
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