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Nested If or single if with And operator, which is better approach?
Single If with And

if (txtPackage.Text != string.Empty && txtPackage.Text == "abc")
{
   //
}

Nested If

if (txtPackage.Text != string.Empty)
{ 
  if (txtPackage.Text == "abc")
  {
     //
  }
}
share|improve this question
    
btw, in both of your examples, = !String.Empty should be != String.Empty – Powerlord Nov 26 '08 at 13:40

10 Answers 10

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Are you going to do something different in the 'nested if' example if, in fact, txtPackage.Text isn't empty but contains something other than "abc"?

If you aren't, I'd ask why are you checking for string.empty at all?

You could just write:

if (txtPackage.Text == "abc")
{

//

}

and be done with it.

Totally depends upon what you want to do in the end.

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typo: "I'd asK why"... but other than that... very well said :) – Timothy Khouri Nov 26 '08 at 12:11

I wasn't going to chime in, but seeing that some answers here seem to be about "I like my code to look like this"... I feel that I should say something :)

"Better" means the code will execute faster, or it's more readable / extendable. You would want to nest your if's in the case that you would possibly have multiple checks that all have a common requirement.

Example:

if (myThingy != null)
{
    if (myThingy.Text = "Hello") ...

    if (myThingy.SomethingElse = 123) ...
}

EDIT: It also needs to be said that nesting your IF's requires more CPU cycles (and is therefore "slower") than a single IF. On top of that, the order of your conditions can greatly increase performance.

Exapmle again:

if (somethingQuick() && somethingThatTakesASecondToCalculate()) ...

is a LOT faster (of course) than

if (somethingThatTakesASecondToCalculate() && somethingQuick()) ...

Because if the first part of the IF fails, the second part won't even be executed, thus saving time.

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In .NET, it doesn't matter if two IF's are nested or not, they are converted to the exact same MSIL code. Therefore, nesting won't require more CPU cycles. But of course, this is only when the end result is the same. – user39603 Nov 26 '08 at 12:40
1  
In any case: HOLY PREMATURE OPTIMISATION BATMAN! I'd rather be concerned about my code being readable to begin with rather than stressing over individual CPU cycles. – Garry Shutler Nov 26 '08 at 12:54
    
I don't worry about CPU cycles as such... I was simply pointing out that "how my code looks" shouldn't be the first consideration. If one of my senior developers messed up the second example though... there would have to be some e'splainin to do :) – Timothy Khouri Nov 26 '08 at 13:45
1  
"How your code looks", or more exactly, "readability" is most of the time the MOST important thing in code. – configurator Nov 26 '08 at 15:11

no one has mentioned maintaining that code. Which is easier to debug?

if this fails:

if (thisIsTrue && thisIsTrueToo)
    doStuff();

you know one of these two statements failed, but not which one.

if this fails:

if (thisIsTrue) {
  if (thisIsTrueToo)
    doStuff();
}

your exception tells you the line number. I say go for easy maintenance, as you are likely not going to be on this code forever.

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You really need to define what you mean by "better".

My style is to use one if and an AND if, like in your example, I'm testing the same thing for two different values.

If the two tests are conceptually different, I'll probably nest them

if (!user_option.work_offline) {
    if (no_current_connection) {
        start_connection()
    }
}
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I feel that it is better to avoid nested ifs.

Sometimes, I even duplicate simple tests to avoid a nesting level.

Example (python):

# I prefer:
if a and b:
    foo()
elif a and not b:
    bar()
elif not a and b:
    foobar()
elif not a and not b:
    baz()

# Instead of:
if a:
    if b:
        foo()
    else:
        bar()
else:
    if b:
        foobar()
    else:
        baz()

Sometimes it is more natural to have an else-clause as the last part. In those cases, I typically assert the conditions of the else clause. Example:

if a and b:
    foo()
elif a and not b:
    bar()
elif not a and b:
    foobar()
elif not a and not b:
    baz()
else:
    assert not a and not b
    baz()

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+1 to itsmatt

On the original question, I personally avoid nested ifs wherever possible, otherwise I'd end up with lots of arrow code.

There are, however, exceptions to this mini-rule. If there is going to be different behaviour for each of the conditional outcomes, then nested ifs may be an answer. You need to carefully consider the impact of nesting so you don't write difficult to read (and therefore maintain) code.

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I prefer using conditional AND/OR operators when needed, instead of nested ifs. Looks less messy and makes for less lines of code.

if (thisIsTrue) {
if (thisIsTrueToo) doStuff();
}

is essentally same as:

if (thisIsTrue && thisIsTrueToo) doStuff();

if thisIsTrue is false, the second condition is not evaluated. Works also for || for conditional OR.

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I think it depends on how you want it to flow, if you are only executing on true, true (or any other singularity) then one if statement is all you need.

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It depends on what exactly you want to achieve. It's a logical question rather than a programming query. If you have a dependent condition i.e. If the first is TRUE and then test the second condition; if second TRUE then do something , if FALSE do something, in this case you need to use a nested if. But you need the state of both the conditions to do something then you can go with the operators.

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In my opinion, you should use the style that makes the most sense for what you're testing for. If the two are closely coupled, you could test for both on the same line without a loss of clarity. Particularly easy when the program permits "if x == (1 OR 2)" constructions.

On the other hand, if the two tests are disjointed, I'd prefer to separate them to make the logic more explicit.

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