Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Let's say I have the following object:

struct Foo
{
    int size() { return 2; }
};

What's the best way (most maintainable, readable, etc.) to get the total size of all objects in a vector<Foo>? I'll post my solution but I'm interested in better ideas.

Update:

So far we have:

  • std::accumulate and a functor
  • std::accumulate and a lambda expression
  • plain ol' for-loop

Are there any other workable solutions? Can you make something maintainable using boost::bind or std::bind1st/2nd?

share|improve this question
3  
std::vector<Foo> vec; vec.size() * 2, since we know that Foo::size always returns 2. :) –  jalf Jul 8 '10 at 16:39

4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted

In addition to your own suggestion, if your compiler supports C++0x lambda expressions, you can use this shorter version:

std::vector<Foo> vf;

// do something to populate vf


int totalSize = std::accumulate(vf.begin(),
                                vf.end(),
                                0, 
                                [](int sum, const Foo& elem){ return sum + elem.size();});
share|improve this answer
    
typo: a semicolon is missing at the end of the body of the lambda (I can't edit myself). –  rafak Jul 9 '10 at 12:51

Use std::accumulate and a functor.

#include <functional>
#include <numeric>

struct SumSizes : public std::binary_function<int, Foo, int>
{
    int operator()(int total, const Foo& elem) const
    {
        return total + elem.size();
    }
};

std::vector<Foo> vf;

// do something to populate vf

int totalSize = std::accumulate(vf.begin(),
                                vf.end(),
                                0, 
                                SumSizes());
share|improve this answer
    
Your solution is the most idiomatic one, of course, but a dumb iterator loop might be easier in such simple cases. –  Philipp Jul 8 '10 at 15:14
    
+1 This would be improved by templating SumSizes for genericity, since all standard containers have a size() member function. –  Jon Purdy Jul 8 '10 at 15:15
    
@Jon, I think you may have misunderstood the question. The point was not to get the size of the container, but to sum the result of a member function of all elements. Perhaps size was a poor name for such a function. –  Michael Kristofik Jul 8 '10 at 15:29
1  
No, I understood the question, and just thought I'd make an odd point because your example happens to use the identifier size(). If made generic, SumSizes would sum the individual sizes of each element of a container of containers (or sequences, for example std::string). Incidentally. :P –  Jon Purdy Jul 8 '10 at 18:15

I find Boost iterators elegants, although they can be a bit verbose (range-based algorithms would make this better). In this case transform iterators can do the job:

#include <boost/iterator/transform_iterator.hpp>
//...

int totalSize = std::accumulate(
    boost::make_transform_iterator(vf.begin(), std::mem_fn(&Foo::size)),
    boost::make_transform_iterator(vf.end(), std::mem_fn(&Foo::size)),0);

Edit: replaced "boost::bind(&Foo::size,_1)" by "std::mem_fn(&Foo::size)"

Edit: I just found that the Boost.Range library has been updated to introduce range algorithms! Here is a new version of the same solution:

#include <boost/range/distance.hpp> // numeric.hpp needs it (a bug?)
#include <boost/range/numeric.hpp> // accumulate
#include <boost/range/adaptor/transformed.hpp> // transformed
//...
int totalSize = boost::accumulate(
    vf | boost::adaptors::transformed(std::mem_fn(Foo::size)), 0);

Note: the performances are approximately the same (see my comment): internally, transformed uses transorm_iterator.

share|improve this answer
1  
I did timings comparing this solution and the direct one, and unfortunately this one is slower (I found a factor between 2 and 5). However this may not be a concern. –  rafak Jul 11 '10 at 13:08
    
I think this is the best answer. The problem is what to accumulate, which is addressed by a custom iterator, not how to accumulate, which is addressed by using a functor. The default accumulation behaviour (plus) is what you want. Consider extending this problem to the inner product: the transformed iterator is reusable whereas the functor is not. A new functor for every algorithm would be required simply to redefine the default behaviour in terms of member size(). –  Jeremy W. Murphy Sep 15 '13 at 7:14

Here is the down-to-earth solution:

typedef std::vector<Foo> FooVector;
FooVector vf;
int totalSize = 0;
for (FooVector::const_iterator it = vf.begin(); it != vf.end(); ++it) {
  totalSize += it->size();
}
share|improve this answer
    
So much easier to read than the other, functional solutions. –  Jon Sep 20 '10 at 4:53

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.