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Using compression with WCF in IIS I can find documentation for, but its oriented towards using IIS features.

I can find people talking about how they've written their own compression handlers, but it all looks pretty custom.

Is there a best practice around compressing WCF? We're using http bindings.

Edit: setting this as a wiki.

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There's nothing out of the box to help you with this.

You can indeed implement your own compression extensions for WCF - several folks have done it, and you should be able to find it using your favorite search engine.

But the best thing you could do for your bindings - as long as your clients all are under your control and you can easily configure them - would be to use binary message encoding vs. textual representations of messages.

You can easily combine binary message encoding with http transport - you need a custom binding, but that's really not a big deal at all. Lots of folks have done that, too - so you can benefit from work that's already been done:

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Thanks for the notes. –  Kyle Hodgson Jul 8 '10 at 17:53
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social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/wcf/thread/… was one that I had found, it seems as good a place to start as any. I was hoping by now there was a canned way to do this. –  Kyle Hodgson Jul 8 '10 at 17:54
    
Well, WCF offers a lot of extensibility points, to plug those kind of things in - where and when needed. –  marc_s Jul 8 '10 at 17:56
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For what it's worth, WCF 4.0 clients support GZip decompression, so you only need to build your own server compression. Server Compression will be added in the next version –  Panagiotis Kanavos Jul 9 '10 at 14:19
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