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I've a set of strings with variable sizes, for example:

AAA23

AB1D1

A1BC

AAB212

My goal is have in alphabetical order and unique characters collected for COLUMNS, such as:

first column : AAAA

second column : AB1A

and so on...

For this moment I was able to extract the posts through a hash of hashes. But now, how can I sort data? Could I for each hash of hash make a new array?

Thank you very much for you help!

Al

My code:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my @sessions = (
    "AAAA",
    "AAAC",
    "ABAB",
    "ABAD"
);

my $length_max = 0;
my $length_tmp = 0;

my %columns;

foreach my $string (@sessions){

    my $l = length($string);

    if ($l > $length_tmp){
            $length_max = $l;
    }
}

print "max legth : $length_max\n\n";

my $n = 1;

foreach my $string (@sessions){

    my @ch = split("",$string);

    for my $col (1..$length_max){
        $columns{$n}{$col} = $ch[$col-1];
    }

    $n++;
}

foreach my $col (keys %columns) {

    print "colonna : $col\n";

    my $deref = $columns{$col};

    foreach my $pos (keys %$deref){
            print " posizione : $pos --> $$deref{$pos}\n";
    }

    print "\n";
}

exit(0);
share|improve this question
    
What are you going to do in the fifth and sixth columns, where some characters are missing? –  Zaid Jul 8 '10 at 18:38
    
You say you want unique characters in each column. To a native English speaker with some mathematics training, this means each column should contain no repeated characters, but the expected answers you give for the first and second columns are AAAA and AB1A. How should numerals sort with respect to alphabetic characters? Given that A appears at both the beginning and end of the second column's answer, it doesn't appear to be sorted at all. –  Greg Bacon Jul 8 '10 at 19:14

2 Answers 2

What you're doing is rotating the array. It doesn't need a hash of hash or anything, just another array. Surprisingly, neither List::Util nor List::MoreUtils supplies one. Here's a straightforward implementation with a test. I presumed you want short entries filled in with spaces so the columns come out correct.

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use Test::More;
use List::Util qw(max);

my @Things = qw(
    AAA23
    AB1D1
    A1BC
    AAB212
);


sub rotate {
    my @rows = @_;

    my $maxlength = max map { length $_ } @rows;

    my @columns;
    for my $row (@rows) {
        my @chars = split //, $row;
        for my $colnum (1..$maxlength) {
            my $idx = $colnum - 1;
            $columns[$idx] .= $chars[$idx] || ' ';
        }
    }

    return @columns;
}


sub print_columns {
    my @columns = @_;

    for my $idx (0..$#columns) {
        printf "Column %d: %s\n", $idx + 1, $columns[$idx];
    }
}


sub test_rotate {
    is_deeply [rotate @_], [
        "AAAA",
        "AB1A",
        "A1BB",
        "2DC2",
        "31 1",
        "   2",
    ];
}


test_rotate(@Things);
print_columns(@Things);
done_testing;
share|improve this answer
    
I can't read about array rotation without thinking of this post by Raymond Chen: blogs.msdn.com/b/oldnewthing/archive/2008/09/02/8918130.aspx. After reading the body, scroll down to the comment by "640k" for the fun part. "You can even rotate by 10 degrees!" –  Justin R. Jul 8 '10 at 18:52
1  
Yeah, I too was disappointed when I didn't find a transpose in List::MoreUtils... –  Zaid Jul 8 '10 at 19:02

You can sort the output of %columns in your code with

foreach my $i (sort { $a <=> $b } keys %columns) {
  print join(" " => sort values %{ $columns{$i} }), "\n";
}

This gives

A A A A 
A A A C 
A A B B 
A A B D

But using index numbers as hash keys screams that you should use an array instead, so let's do that. To get the columns, use

sub columns {
  my @strings = @_;
  my @columns;

  while (@strings) {
    push @columns => [ sort map s/^(.)//s ? $1 : (), @strings ];
    @strings = grep length, @strings;
  }

  @columns;
}

Given the strings from your question, it returns

A A A A
1 A A B
1 A B B
2 2 C D
1 1 3
2

As you can see, this is unsorted and repeats characters. With Perl, when you see the word unique, always think of hashes!

sub unique_sorted_columns {
  map { my %unique;
        ++$unique{$_} for @$_;
        [ sort keys %unique ];
      }
      columns @_;
}

If you don't mind destroying information, you can have columns sort and filter duplicates:

sub columns {
  my @strings = @_;
  my @columns;

  while (@strings) {
    my %unique;
    map { ++$unique{$1} if s/^(.)//s } @strings;
    push @columns => [ sort keys %unique ];
    @strings = grep length, @strings;
  }

  @columns;
}

Output:

A
1 A B
1 A B
2 C D
1 3
2
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