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.NET 4.0 has a nice utility class called System.Lazy that does lazy object initialization. I would like to use this class for a 3.5 project. One time I saw an implementation somewhere in a stackoverflow answer but I can't find it anymore. Does someone have an alternative implementation of Lazy? It doesn't need all the thread safety features of the framework 4.0 version.

Updated:

Answers contain a non thread safe and a thread safe version.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 22 down vote accepted

Here is an implementation that I use.

/// <summary>
/// Provides support for lazy initialization.
/// </summary>
/// <typeparam name="T">Specifies the type of object that is being lazily initialized.</typeparam>
public sealed class Lazy<T>
{
    private readonly object padlock = new object();
    private readonly Func<T> createValue;
    private bool isValueCreated;
    private T value;

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets the lazily initialized value of the current Lazy{T} instance.
    /// </summary>
    public T Value
    {
        get
        {
            if (!isValueCreated)
            {
                lock (padlock)
                {
                    if (!isValueCreated)
                    {
                        value = createValue();
                        isValueCreated = true;
                    }
                }
            }
            return value;
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets a value that indicates whether a value has been created for this Lazy{T} instance.
    /// </summary>
    public bool IsValueCreated
    {
        get
        {
            lock (padlock)
            {
                return isValueCreated;
            }
        }
    }


    /// <summary>
    /// Initializes a new instance of the Lazy{T} class.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="createValue">The delegate that produces the value when it is needed.</param>
    public Lazy(Func<T> createValue)
    {
        if (createValue == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("createValue");

        this.createValue = createValue;
    }


    /// <summary>
    /// Creates and returns a string representation of the Lazy{T}.Value.
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns>The string representation of the Lazy{T}.Value property.</returns>
    public override string ToString()
    {
        return Value.ToString();
    }
}
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Two problems I have with this: First of all, it's preferable to lock a private object than to lock (this), since you can't control who else might lock on your Lazy instance. Second, I don't think making isValueCreated a volatile field serves any purpose when you're already using a critical section (does it? Correct me if I'm wrong). –  Aaronaught Jul 8 '10 at 20:54
    
I agree volatile is used when locking is not used. From MSDN: The volatile modifier is usually used for a field that is accessed by multiple threads without using the lock statement to serialize access. Using the volatile modifier ensures that one thread retrieves the most up-to-date value written by another thread. –  BC. Jul 8 '10 at 21:12
    
I modified the answer. –  BC. Jul 8 '10 at 21:18
4  
The code doesn't seems to be entirely thread-safe yet. It may be better to use a memory barrier as suggested in Wikipedia: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… –  Cesar Nov 5 '12 at 23:30
1  
It is not thread-safe the lines: value = createValue(); isValueCreated = true; can be swaped! Making isValueCreated as volatile will fix the problem. Resources: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/jj863136.aspx and albahari.com/threading/part4.aspx –  Pellared Mar 18 '14 at 8:06

If you don't need thread-safety, it's pretty easy to put one together with a factory method. I use one very similar to the following:

public class Lazy<T>
{
    private readonly Func<T> initializer;
    private bool isValueCreated;
    private T value;

    public Lazy(Func<T> initializer)
    {
        if (initializer == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("initializer");
        this.initializer = initializer;
    }

    public bool IsValueCreated
    {
        get { return isValueCreated; }
    }

    public T Value
    {
        get
        {
            if (!isValueCreated)
            {
                value = initializer();
                isValueCreated = true;
            }
            return value;
        }
    }
}
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Anyone who might copy this: It can be easy to have closure confusion with the initializer here. Make sure to capture your values! –  Rex M Jul 8 '10 at 20:19
    
@Rex: Do you mean, if you're initializing the Lazy<T> instance from a loop? Does System.Lazy do some magic to sidestep the normal dangers of capturing? –  Aaronaught Jul 8 '10 at 20:35
    
a loop is a good example. I doubt if the real Lazy is any different, though I am not sure. Just thought I'd point it out because I see a lot of people get themselves in trouble with this kind of pattern. –  Rex M Jul 8 '10 at 20:43
    
@Rex: Alrighty, just wanted to make sure you were referring to a usage scenario and not a design flaw that I failed to recognize. –  Aaronaught Jul 8 '10 at 23:02

A somewhat simplify version of aaron's

public class Lazy<T> where T : new()
{ 
  private T value; 

  public bool IsValueCreated { get; private set;}

  public T Value 
  { 
    get 
    { 
        if (!IsValueCreated) 
        { 
            value = new T();
            IsValueCreated = true; 
        } 
        return value; 
    } 
  } 
} 
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Requires default ctor –  BC. Jul 8 '10 at 20:33
3  
@BC : Yes, which is what the ` where T : new() ` means. –  James Curran Jul 8 '10 at 20:34

Some funny (but not very usable) stuff can be added: implicit coversion from delegate:

public static implicit operator Lazy<T>(Func<T> initializer)
{
    return new Lazy<T>(initializer);
}  

And usage

private static Lazy<int> Value = new Func<int>(() => 24 * 22);

C# compiler have some problem with performing this conversion, for example assigning lambda expression does not work, but it is one more thing causes your colleguas to think a bit :)

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lambdas can either be expression trees or delegates so the compiler refuse to consider them to be one or the other. same reason why you can't put a lambda in a var. Really annoying sometimes... –  Julien Roncaglia Jul 8 '10 at 20:32
    
You are right, but this code does not work even with methods: ` public static int NewValue() { return 24 * 15; } public static Lazy<int> V = NewValue; // Compilation Error, needs new Func<int>(NewValue)` –  STO Jul 8 '10 at 20:40

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