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Any pointers on how to solve efficiently the following function in Haskell, for large numbers (n > 108)

f(n) = max(n, f(n/2) + f(n/3) + f(n/4))

I've seen examples of memoization in Haskell to solve fibonacci numbers, which involved computing (lazily) all the fibonacci numbers up to the required n. But in this case, for a given n, we only need to compute very few intermediate results.

Thanks

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Is this homework? –  Aryabhatta Jul 8 '10 at 21:54
35  
Only in the sense that it is some work that I'm doing at home :-) –  Angel de Vicente Jul 8 '10 at 21:58
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5 Answers

up vote 86 down vote accepted

We can do this very efficiently by making a structure that we can index in sub-linear time.

But first,

{-# LANGUAGE BangPatterns #-}

import Data.Function (fix)

Let's define f, but make it use 'open recursion' rather than call itself directly.

f :: (Int -> Int) -> Int -> Int
f mf 0 = 0
f mf n = max n $ mf (div n 2) +
                 mf (div n 3) +
                 mf (div n 4)

You can get an unmemoized f by using fix f

This will let you test that f does what you mean for small values of f by calling, for example: fix f 123 = 144

We could memoize this by defining:

f_list :: [Int]
f_list = map (f faster_f) [0..]

faster_f :: Int -> Int
faster_f n = f_list !! n

That performs passably well, and replaces what was going to take O(n^3) time with something that memoizes the intermediate results.

But it still takes linear time just to index to find the memoized answer for mf. This means that results like:

*Main Data.List> faster_f 123801
248604

are tolerable, but the result doesn't scale much better than that. We can do better!

First lets define an infinite tree:

data Tree a = Tree (Tree a) a (Tree a)
instance Functor Tree where
    fmap f (Tree l m r) = Tree (fmap f l) (f m) (fmap f r)

And then we'll define a way to index into it, so we can find a node with index n in O(log n) time instead:

index :: Tree a -> Int -> a
index (Tree _ m _) 0 = m
index (Tree l _ r) n = case (n - 1) `divMod` 2 of
    (q,0) -> index l q
    (q,1) -> index r q

... and we may find a tree full of natural numbers to be convenient so we don't have to fiddle around with those indices:

nats :: Tree Int
nats = go 0 1
    where
        go !n !s = Tree (go l s') n (go r s')
            where
                l = n + s
                r = l + s
                s' = s * 2

Since we can index, you can just convert a tree into a list:

toList :: Tree a -> [a]
toList as = map (index as) [0..]

You can check the work so far by verifying that toList nats gives you [0..]

Now,

f_tree :: Tree Int
f_tree = fmap (f fastest_f) nats

fastest_f :: Int -> Int
fastest_f = index f_tree

works just like with list above, but instead of taking linear time to find each node, can chase it down in logarithmic time.

The result is considerably faster:

*Main> fastest_f 12380192300
67652175206

*Main> fastest_f 12793129379123
120695231674999

In fact it is so much faster that you can go through and replace Int with Integer above and get ridiculously large answers almost instantaneously

*Main> fastest_f' 1230891823091823018203123
93721573993600178112200489

*Main> fastest_f' 12308918230918230182031231231293810923
11097012733777002208302545289166620866358
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This is so wonderful. I will have to remember this trick. –  Tyr May 2 '11 at 21:10
2  
I tried this code and, interestingly, f_faster seemed to be slower than f. I guess those list references really slowed things down. The definition of nats and index seemed pretty mysterious to me, so I've added my own answer which might make things clearer. –  Pitarou Jun 16 '12 at 4:41
    
@EdwardKmett I have spent hours learning / researching how this works and its very clever. But what i cant find is, why does the infinite list take so much more memory then the infinite tree? for example if you call "fastest_f 111111111" while watching ghci's memory usage you can see it uses next to nothing. But when you call faster_f 111111111 it uses around 1.5gb then ghci ends because I'm out of memory. I've tested their subsequent calls using ghci's :set +s and fastest_f does improve its speed to next to nothing and so does faster_f. So whats going on? –  QuantumKarl Dec 8 '13 at 22:01
    
The infinite list case has to deal with a linked list 111111111 items long. The tree case is dealing with log n * the number of nodes reached. –  Edward Kmett Dec 17 '13 at 7:15
1  
i.e. the list version has to create thunks for all nodes in the list, whereas the tree version avoids creating a lot of them. –  Tom Ellis Dec 17 '13 at 8:48
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Not the most efficient way, but does memoize:

f = 0 : [ g n | n <- [1..] ]
    where g n = max n $ f!!(n `div` 2) + f!!(n `div` 3) + f!!(n `div` 4)

when requesting f !! 144, it is checked that f !! 143 exists, but its exact value is not calculated. It's still set as some unknown result of a calculation. The only exact values calculated are the ones needed.

So initially, as far as how much has been calculated, the program knows nothing.

f = .... 

When we make the request f !! 12, it starts doing some pattern matching:

f = 0 : g 1 : g 2 : g 3 : g 4 : g 5 : g 6 : g 7 : g 8 : g 9 : g 10 : g 11 : g 12 : ...

Now it starts calculating

f !! 12 = g 12 = max 12 $ f!!6 + f!!4 + f!!3

This recursively makes another demand on f, so we calculate

f !! 6 = g 6 = max 6 $ f !! 3 + f !! 2 + f !! 1
f !! 3 = g 3 = max 3 $ f !! 1 + f !! 1 + f !! 0
f !! 1 = g 1 = max 1 $ f !! 0 + f !! 0 + f !! 0
f !! 0 = 0

Now we can trickle back up some

f !! 1 = g 1 = max 1 $ 0 + 0 + 0 = 1

Which means the program now knows:

f = 0 : 1 : g 2 : g 3 : g 4 : g 5 : g 6 : g 7 : g 8 : g 9 : g 10 : g 11 : g 12 : ...

Continuing to trickle up:

f !! 3 = g 3 = max 3 $ 1 + 1 + 0 = 3

Which means the program now knows:

f = 0 : 1 : g 2 : 3 : g 4 : g 5 : g 6 : g 7 : g 8 : g 9 : g 10 : g 11 : g 12 : ...

Now we continue with our calculation of f!!6:

f !! 6 = g 6 = max 6 $ 3 + f !! 2 + 1
f !! 2 = g 2 = max 2 $ f !! 1 + f !! 0 + f !! 0 = max 2 $ 1 + 0 + 0 = 2
f !! 6 = g 6 = max 6 $ 3 + 2 + 1 = 6

Which means the program now knows:

f = 0 : 1 : 2 : 3 : g 4 : g 5 : 6 : g 7 : g 8 : g 9 : g 10 : g 11 : g 12 : ...

Now we continue with our calculation of f!!12:

f !! 12 = g 12 = max 12 $ 6 + f!!4 + 3
f !! 4 = g 4 = max 4 $ f !! 2 + f !! 1 + f !! 1 = max 4 $ 2 + 1 + 1 = 4
f !! 12 = g 12 = max 12 $ 6 + 4 + 3 = 13

Which means the program now knows:

f = 0 : 1 : 2 : 3 : 4 : g 5 : 6 : g 7 : g 8 : g 9 : g 10 : g 11 : 13 : ...

So the calculation is done fairly lazily. The program knows that some value for f !! 8 exists, that it's equal to g 8, but it has no idea what g 8 is.

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Thanks for this. I'm still very new to Haskell, so there is plenty of stuff in your answer that I need to understand, but I will try it. –  Angel de Vicente Jul 8 '10 at 22:03
    
Thank you for this one. How would you create and use a 2 dimensional solution space? Would that be a list of lists? and g n m = (something with) f!!a!!b –  vikingsteve Jan 6 at 8:21
    
Sure, you could. For a real solution, though, i'd probably use a memoization library, like memocombinators –  rampion Jan 7 at 3:14
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Edward's answer is such a wonderful gem that I've duplicated it and provided implementations of memoList and memoTree combinators that memoize a function in open-recursive form.

{-# LANGUAGE BangPatterns #-}

import Data.Function (fix)

f :: (Integer -> Integer) -> Integer -> Integer
f mf 0 = 0
f mf n = max n $ mf (div n 2) +
                 mf (div n 3) +
                 mf (div n 4)


-- Memoizing using a list

-- The memoizing functionality depends on this being in eta reduced form!
memoList :: ((Integer -> Integer) -> Integer -> Integer) -> Integer -> Integer
memoList f = memoList_f
  where memoList_f = (memo !!) . fromInteger
        memo = map (f memoList_f) [0..]

faster_f :: Integer -> Integer
faster_f = memoList f


-- Memoizing using a tree

data Tree a = Tree (Tree a) a (Tree a)
instance Functor Tree where
    fmap f (Tree l m r) = Tree (fmap f l) (f m) (fmap f r)

index :: Tree a -> Integer -> a
index (Tree _ m _) 0 = m
index (Tree l _ r) n = case (n - 1) `divMod` 2 of
    (q,0) -> index l q
    (q,1) -> index r q

nats :: Tree Integer
nats = go 0 1
    where
        go !n !s = Tree (go l s') n (go r s')
            where
                l = n + s
                r = l + s
                s' = s * 2

toList :: Tree a -> [a]
toList as = map (index as) [0..]

-- The memoizing functionality depends on this being in eta reduced form!
memoTree :: ((Integer -> Integer) -> Integer -> Integer) -> Integer -> Integer
memoTree f = memoTree_f
  where memoTree_f = index memo
        memo = fmap (f memoTree_f) nats

fastest_f :: Integer -> Integer
fastest_f = memoTree f
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This is an addendum to Edward Kmett's excellent answer.

When I tried his code, the definitions of nats and index seemed pretty mysterious, so I write an alternative version that I found easier to understand.

I define index and nats in terms of index' and nats'.

index' t n is defined over the range [1..]. (Recall that index t is defined over the range [0..].) It works searches the tree by treating n as a string of bits, and reading through the bits in reverse. If the bit is 1, it takes the right-hand branch. If the bit is 0, it takes the left-hand branch. It stops when it reaches the last bit (which must be a 1).

index' (Tree l m r) 1 = m
index' (Tree l m r) n = case n `divMod` 2 of
                          (n', 0) -> index' l n'
                          (n', 1) -> index' r n'

Just as nats is defined for index so that index nats n == n is always true, nats' is defined for index'.

nats' = Tree l 1 r
  where
    l = fmap (\n -> n*2)     nats'
    r = fmap (\n -> n*2 + 1) nats'
    nats' = Tree l 1 r

Now, nats and index are simply nats' and index' but with the values shifted by 1:

index t n = index' t (n+1)
nats = fmap (\n -> n-1) nats'
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Yet another addendum to Edward Kmett's answer: a self-contained example:

data NatTrie v = NatTrie (NatTrie v) v (NatTrie v)

memo1 arg_to_index index_to_arg f = (\n -> index nats (arg_to_index n))
  where nats = go 0 1
        go i s = NatTrie (go (i+s) s') (f (index_to_arg i)) (go (i+s') s')
          where s' = 2*s
        index (NatTrie l v r) i
          | i <  0    = f (index_to_arg i)
          | i == 0    = v
          | otherwise = case (i-1) `divMod` 2 of
             (i',0) -> index l i'
             (i',1) -> index r i'

memoNat = memo1 id id 

Use it as follows to memoize a function with a single integer arg (e.g. fibonacci):

fib = memoNat f
  where f 0 = 0
        f 1 = 1
        f n = fib (n-1) + fib (n-2)

Only values for non-negative arguments will be cached.

To also cache values for negative arguments, use memoInt, defined as follows:

memoInt = memo1 arg_to_index index_to_arg
  where arg_to_index n
         | n < 0     = -2*n
         | otherwise =  2*n + 1
        index_to_arg i = case i `divMod` 2 of
           (n,0) -> -n
           (n,1) ->  n

To cache values for functions with two integer arguments use memoIntInt, defined as follows:

memoIntInt f = memoInt (\n -> memoInt (f n))
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