Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I was told this is a buggy code, but I don't know why, some could explain it to me. why there would not be an array out of bound exception when I compile?

int a[10];
int j;

void main () {
    int i, j = 42;
    for (i = 0; i <=10; i++) a[i] = i;
    printf("%d", j);
}
share|improve this question
5  
You should explain what bug you see? What did you expect to happen, and what did you actually observe? –  abelenky Jul 8 '10 at 23:26
1  
The fact that you have j defined right after a, and after you overrun the array, you print j suggest to me that you perfectly well know what's happening. Or you need to phrase your question explicitly. In any case, whatever behavior you see from your program, it is not guaranteed to behave the same everywhere. –  Alok Singhal Jul 8 '10 at 23:29
3  
"the" presumes there's only one bug in the code -- which is wrong. –  Jerry Coffin Jul 8 '10 at 23:31
1  
Another pitfall is that you're doing what's called variable shadowing. The global variable j is not the same as the variable j declared in main(). I suggest you remove the global. –  SiegeX Jul 8 '10 at 23:38
    
hey guys, could we justify downvotes? so the user knows. I'm guessing it's because he's not defined the bug, which makes the answers useful, but the question meaningless... –  andy Jul 8 '10 at 23:44

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here's one bug:

void main () {

should be

int main (int argc, char** argv) {

Another bug is in your loop. You write past the end of array a, and if your compiler placed j in memory immediately following a (which based on your question I assume it did), then the out-of-bounds array access will actually end up assigning a value to j. Hence, when you write 10 into a[10] (which doesn't exist), you are writing it into the memory where j lives (causing this to act like j = 10). However, this behavior is dependent on how your compiler lays out the variables in memory, so you may very well see different behavior if you compiled the same program on a different platform.

share|improve this answer
4  
I would say in this case int main(void) would be more ideal to convey that this program takes no arguments but it should still return an int. –  SiegeX Jul 8 '10 at 23:35
4  
Not necessarily a bug - it could be that he wants main to return nothing and use no arguments. –  Michael Dorgan Jul 8 '10 at 23:46
    
@Michael Dorgan: +1 the C99 standard explicitly allows main to have any return type you (or, more accurately, the implementation) like. –  JeremyP Jul 9 '10 at 8:46
1  
@Michael Dorgan It doesn't matter what he wants, it matters what the standard mandates. (P.S. an empty parameter list doesn't mean "no arguments") @JeremyP Read more closely; that's only true for freestanding environments. –  Nietzche-jou Jul 10 '10 at 14:13

You've allocated 10 spaces. You fill 11.

share|improve this answer

Change

int a[10];

to

int a[11];

or

for (i = 0; i <=10; i++) a[i] = i;

to

for (i = 0; i < 10; i++) a[i] = i;

You've created an array with a count of 10 and try to put 11 elements in it. You either need to put only 10 elements in it or create a bigger array.

share|improve this answer
1  
Technically correct, but does not explain why it fails in the first place. –  Charlie Salts Jul 8 '10 at 23:26
    
You can also autodetect the size of a: for (i = 0; i < sizeof(a)/sizeof(a[0]); i++) a[i] = i; –  dolmen Jul 9 '10 at 12:45

filling array crossing the boundary...a[10] is wrong.

share|improve this answer

There should not be an overflow of array, thats correct as you have mentioned in your question. But some compilers will give a PASS with the code whereas others will trigger a warning (or error is elevated).

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.