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I want to effectively throttle an event stream, so that my delegate is called when the first event is received but then not for 1 second if subsequent events are received. After expiry of that timeout (1 second), if a subsequent event was received I want my delegate to be called.

Is there a simple way to do this using Reactive Extensions?

Sample code:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Running...");

    var generator = Observable
        .GenerateWithTime(1, x => x <= 100, x => x, x => TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(1), x => x + 1)
        .Timestamp();

    var builder = new StringBuilder();

    generator
        .Sample(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(1))
        .Finally(() => Console.WriteLine(builder.ToString()))
        .Subscribe(feed =>
                   builder.AppendLine(string.Format("Observed {0:000}, generated at {1}, observed at {2}",
                                                    feed.Value,
                                                    feed.Timestamp.ToString("mm:ss.fff"),
                                                    DateTime.Now.ToString("mm:ss.fff"))));

    Console.ReadKey();
}

Current output:

Running...
Observed 064, generated at 41:43.602, observed at 41:43.602
Observed 100, generated at 41:44.165, observed at 41:44.602

But I want to observe (timestamps obviously will change)

Running...
Observed 001, generated at 41:43.602, observed at 41:43.602
....
Observed 100, generated at 41:44.165, observed at 41:44.602
share|improve this question
8  
That's just a cool lambda statement x => x <= 100 ;) –  Oliver Jul 9 '10 at 8:52

7 Answers 7

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Here's is what I got with some help from the RX Forum:

The idea is to issue a series of "tickets" for the original sequence to fire. These "tickets" are delayed for the timeout, excluding the very first one, which is immediately pre-pended to the ticket sequence. When an event comes in and there is a ticket waiting, the event fires immediately, otherwise it waits till the ticket and then fires. When it fires, the next ticket is issued, and so on...

To combine the tickets and original events, we need a combinator. Unfortunately, the "standard" .CombineLatest cannot be used here because it would fire on tickets and events that were used previousely. So I had to create my own combinator, which is basically a filtered .CombineLatest, that fires only when both elements in the combination are "fresh" - were never returned before. I call it .CombineVeryLatest aka .BrokenZip ;)

Using .CombineVeryLatest, the above idea can be implemented as such:

    public static IObservable<T> SampleResponsive<T>(
        this IObservable<T> source, TimeSpan delay)
    {
        return source.Publish(src =>
        {
            var fire = new Subject<T>();

            var whenCanFire = fire
                .Select(u => new Unit())
                .Delay(delay)
                .StartWith(new Unit());

            var subscription = src
                .CombineVeryLatest(whenCanFire, (x, flag) => x)
                .Subscribe(fire);

            return fire.Finally(subscription.Dispose);
        });
    }

    public static IObservable<TResult> CombineVeryLatest
        <TLeft, TRight, TResult>(this IObservable<TLeft> leftSource,
        IObservable<TRight> rightSource, Func<TLeft, TRight, TResult> selector)
    {
        var ls = leftSource.Select(x => new Used<TLeft>(x));
        var rs = rightSource.Select(x => new Used<TRight>(x));
        var cmb = ls.CombineLatest(rs, (x, y) => new { x, y });
        var fltCmb = cmb
            .Where(a => !(a.x.IsUsed || a.y.IsUsed))
            .Do(a => { a.x.IsUsed = true; a.y.IsUsed = true; });
        return fltCmb.Select(a => selector(a.x.Value, a.y.Value));
    }

    private class Used<T>
    {
        internal T Value { get; private set; }
        internal bool IsUsed { get; set; }

        internal Used(T value)
        {
            Value = value;
        }
    }

Edit: here's another more compact variation of CombineVeryLatest proposed by Andreas Köpf on the forum:

public static IObservable<TResult> CombineVeryLatest
  <TLeft, TRight, TResult>(this IObservable<TLeft> leftSource,
  IObservable<TRight> rightSource, Func<TLeft, TRight, TResult> selector)
{
    return Observable.Defer(() =>
    {
        int l = -1, r = -1;
        return Observable.CombineLatest(
            leftSource.Select(Tuple.Create<TLeft, int>),
            rightSource.Select(Tuple.Create<TRight, int>),
                (x, y) => new { x, y })
            .Where(t => t.x.Item2 != l && t.y.Item2 != r)
            .Do(t => { l = t.x.Item2; r = t.y.Item2; })
            .Select(t => selector(t.x.Item1, t.y.Item1));
    });
}
share|improve this answer

Okay,

you have 3 scenarios here:

1) I would like to get one value of the event stream every second. means: that if it produces more events per second, you will get a allways bigger buffer.

observableStream.Throttle(timeSpan)

2) I would like to get the latest event, that was produced bevore the second happens means: other events get dropped.

observableStream.Sample(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(1))

3) you would like to get all events, that happend in the last second. and that every second

observableStream.BufferWithTime(timeSpan)

4) you want to select what happens in between the second with all the values, till the second has passed, and your result is returned

observableStream.CombineLatest(Observable.Interval(1000), selectorOnEachEvent)
share|improve this answer
    
Dang, scenario 2 is exactly what I'm looking for, and I haven't been able to find the method either :( –  deadlydog Oct 23 '12 at 18:17
1  
In case anyone needs it: stream.Sample(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(1)) –  Alex G Jun 24 '13 at 14:56

I was struggling with this same problem last night, and believe I've found a more elegant (or at least shorter) solution:

var delay = Observable.Empty<T>().Delay(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(1));
var throttledSource = source.Take(1).Concat(delay).Repeat();
share|improve this answer
    
Please edit your answer and format your code. –  dandan78 Apr 29 '11 at 13:57

This is the what I posted as an answer to this question in the Rx forum:

UPDATE: Here is a new version that does no longer delay event forwarding when events occur with a time difference of more than one second:

public static IObservable<T> ThrottleResponsive3<T>(this IObservable<T> source, TimeSpan minInterval)
{
    return Observable.CreateWithDisposable<T>(o =>
    {
        object gate = new Object();
        Notification<T> last = null, lastNonTerminal = null;
        DateTime referenceTime = DateTime.UtcNow - minInterval;
        var delayedReplay = new MutableDisposable();
        return new CompositeDisposable(source.Materialize().Subscribe(x =>
        {
            lock (gate)
            {
                var elapsed = DateTime.UtcNow - referenceTime;
                if (elapsed >= minInterval && delayedReplay.Disposable == null)
                {
                    referenceTime = DateTime.UtcNow;
                    x.Accept(o);
                }
                else
                {
                    if (x.Kind == NotificationKind.OnNext)
                        lastNonTerminal = x;
                    last = x;
                    if (delayedReplay.Disposable == null)
                    {
                        delayedReplay.Disposable = Scheduler.ThreadPool.Schedule(() =>
                        {
                            lock (gate)
                            {
                                referenceTime = DateTime.UtcNow;
                                if (lastNonTerminal != null && lastNonTerminal != last)
                                    lastNonTerminal.Accept(o);
                                last.Accept(o);
                                last = lastNonTerminal = null;
                                delayedReplay.Disposable = null;
                            }
                        }, minInterval - elapsed);
                    }
                }
            }
        }), delayedReplay);
    });
}

This was my earlier try:

var source = Observable.GenerateWithTime(1, 
    x => x <= 100, x => x, x => TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(1), x => x + 1)
    .Timestamp();

source.Publish(o =>
    o.Take(1).Merge(o.Skip(1).Sample(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(1)))
).Run(x => Console.WriteLine(x));
share|improve this answer

Ok, here's one solution. I don't like it, particularly, but... oh well.

Hat tips to Jon for pointing me at SkipWhile, and to cRichter for the BufferWithTime. Thanks guys.

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Running...");

    var generator = Observable
        .GenerateWithTime(1, x => x <= 100, x => x, x => TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(1), x => x + 1)
        .Timestamp();

    var bufferedAtOneSec = generator.BufferWithTime(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(1));

    var action = new Action<Timestamped<int>>(
        feed => Console.WriteLine("Observed {0:000}, generated at {1}, observed at {2}",
                                  feed.Value,
                                  feed.Timestamp.ToString("mm:ss.fff"),
                                  DateTime.Now.ToString("mm:ss.fff")));

    var reactImmediately = true;
    bufferedAtOneSec.Subscribe(list =>
                                   {
                                       if (list.Count == 0)
                                       {
                                           reactImmediately = true;
                                       }
                                       else
                                       {
                                           action(list.Last());
                                       }
                                   });
    generator
        .SkipWhile(item => reactImmediately == false)
        .Subscribe(feed =>
                       {
                           if(reactImmediately)
                           {
                               reactImmediately = false;
                               action(feed);
                           }
                       });

    Console.ReadKey();
}
share|improve this answer

Have you tried the Throttle extension method?

From the docs:

Ignores values from an observable sequence which are followed by another value before dueTime

It's not quite clear to me whether that's going to do what you want or not - in that you want to ignore the following values rather than the first value... but I would expect it to be what you want. Give it a try :)

EDIT: Hmmm... no, I don't think Throttle is the right thing, after all. I believe I see what you want to do, but I can't see anything in the framework to do it. I may well have missed something though. Have you asked on the Rx forum? It may well be that if it's not there now, they'd be happy to add it :)

I suspect you could do it cunningly with SkipUntil and SelectMany somehow... but I think it should be in its own method.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Jon. I gave it a shot, but its not quite what I want. In the example, using Throttle causes all but the last event to be ignored. I need to react upon the first event (to provide a responsive system), but to then delay at a 1 second sampling rate for subsequent events. –  Alex Jul 9 '10 at 9:34
    
@Alex: Yup, that's what I found too. (See my edit.) –  Jon Skeet Jul 9 '10 at 9:46

What you are searching for is the CombineLatest.

public static IObservable<TResult> CombineLatest<TLeft, TRight, TResult>(
    IObservable<TLeft> leftSource,
    IObservable<TRight> rightSource,
    Func<TLeft, TRight, TResult> selector
)

that merges 2 obeservables, and returning all values, when the selector (time) has a value.

edit: john is right, that is maybe not the preferred solution

share|improve this answer
    
I don't see how that's what he's after - what do you see as the two observables here? –  Jon Skeet Jul 9 '10 at 9:06
    
One is the Events he generate, the selector is a Observable.Interval(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(1)) –  cRichter Jul 9 '10 at 9:31
    
Won't that generate an event every time either of them produces a value? –  Jon Skeet Jul 9 '10 at 9:34
    
Doing this... var interval = Observable.Interval(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(1)).Start(); generator.CombineLatest(interval, (value, gate) => value ) ... resulted in no observations. I don't know how I would use CombineLatest to achieve this. –  Alex Jul 9 '10 at 9:58
    
True, but you can select what should happen then. e.g. when its from stream1, then cache it and return null, if its from stream 2, then return the cache. the only thing what you have to do afterwards is limit the results, that no null values should be returned. (basically, thats how the BufferWithTime is implemented ;-) –  cRichter Jul 9 '10 at 9:59

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