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SET SS_SOURCE_PROJECT = sausages
@echo SS_SOURCE_PROJECT = %SS_SOURCE_PROJECT%

This isn't working, it just outputs:

SS_SOURCE_PROJECT =

But I am expecting

SS_SOURCE_PROJECT = sausages

This is on WinXP if it matters. What obvious dumb thing am I doing wrong?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

remove spaces:

SET SS_SOURCE_PROJECT=sausages

Yes, batch syntax is terrible.

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s/terrible/exciting/ –  Tim Robinson Jul 9 '10 at 9:26
    
You're my hero! –  Mr. Boy Jul 9 '10 at 9:58
1  
Well, “terrible” on the one side is “easy to implement” on the other side ;-). As far as I know at least one Unix shell also has this specific behavior and yet there it's never called terrible but rather superior. Hm. –  Joey Jul 9 '10 at 13:01
    
@Johannes: I don't know the unix shell very well, but sometimes I get the feeling that DOS only owns the terrible part of a shell syntax and just left out the superior bit. –  Stefan Steinegger Jul 9 '10 at 17:20
    
I still have proving Turing-completeness of batch files on my todo list. but yes, there are nicer alternatives. Still, it's fun to write then, for me at least. I don't have as much fun writing shell scripts ;-) –  Joey Jul 9 '10 at 17:39

To expand on @Stefan's answer, the original code works like this: (note the spaces)

C:\>SET SS_SOURCE_PROJECT = sausages

C:\>echo "%SS_SOURCE_PROJECT %"
" sausages"
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1+, That's true, I didn't even think about it :-) –  Stefan Steinegger Jul 9 '10 at 9:29

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