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Is there an efficient method of converting an integer into the written numbers, for example:

string Written = IntegerToWritten(21);

would return "Twenty One".

Is there any way of doing this that doesn't involve a massive look-up table?

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I'd expect 21 to return twenty-one, not twenty one. Hyphenation matters: three thousand four hundred and seventy-six. –  TRiG Feb 19 '10 at 18:13
    
Here's the approach I took: blackbeltcoder.com/Articles/strings/converting-numbers-to-words –  Jonathan Wood Dec 29 '10 at 6:28

6 Answers 6

up vote 42 down vote accepted

This should work reasonably well:

public static class HumanFriendlyInteger
{
static string[] ones = new string[] { "", "One", "Two", "Three", "Four", "Five", "Six", "Seven", "Eight", "Nine" };
static string[] teens = new string[] { "Ten", "Eleven", "Twelve", "Thirteen", "Fourteen", "Fifteen", "Sixteen", "Seventeen", "Eighteen", "Nineteen" };
static string[] tens = new string[] { "Twenty", "Thirty", "Forty", "Fifty", "Sixty", "Seventy", "Eighty", "Ninety" };
static string[] thousandsGroups = { "", " Thousand", " Million", " Billion" };

private static string FriendlyInteger(int n, string leftDigits, int thousands)
{
if (n == 0)
{
return leftDigits;
}
string friendlyInt = leftDigits;
if (friendlyInt.Length > 0)
{
friendlyInt += " ";
}

if (n < 10)
{
friendlyInt += ones[n];
}
else if (n < 20)
{
friendlyInt += teens[n - 10];
}
else if (n < 100)
{
friendlyInt += FriendlyInteger(n % 10, tens[n / 10 - 2], 0);
}
else if (n < 1000)
{
friendlyInt += FriendlyInteger(n % 100, (ones[n / 100] + " Hundred"), 0);
}
else
{
friendlyInt += FriendlyInteger(n % 1000, FriendlyInteger(n / 1000, "", thousands+1), 0);
}

return friendlyInt + thousandsGroups[thousands];
}

public static string IntegerToWritten(int n)
{
if (n == 0)
{
return "Zero";
}
else if (n < 0)
{
return "Negative " + IntegerToWritten(-n);
}

return FriendlyInteger(n, "", 0);
}

}

(Edited to make it considerably more concise.)

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9  
I want to see the internationalised version. –  John Nolan Jan 5 '09 at 13:08
1  
It's interesting to note how many tiny differences there are between the above (US English) and a UK English equivalent, let alone other languages... :-) –  Christian Hayter Aug 28 '09 at 12:17
    
I had to insert a return after each recursive call in order to get 1000000 One Million to work. This code produces One Million Thousand. –  AlexanderBrevig May 13 at 8:22

Justin Rogers has a "NumbersToEnglish" class which should do the job for you nicely!

Initial posting.
http://weblogs.asp.net/justin_rogers/archive/2004/06/09/151675.aspx

Finalized Source Code
http://weblogs.asp.net/justin_rogers/articles/151757.aspx

It does have a bit of an internal lookup table but I don't really know how you are going to be able to get away from that.

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I use this code.It is VB code but you can easily translate it to C#. It works

Function NumberToText(ByVal n As Integer) As String

Select Case n
Case 0
Return ""

Case 1 To 19
Dim arr() As String = {"One","Two","Three","Four","Five","Six","Seven", _
"Eight","Nine","Ten","Eleven","Twelve","Thirteen","Fourteen", _
"Fifteen","Sixteen","Seventeen","Eighteen","Nineteen"}
Return arr(n-1) & " "

Case 20 to 99
Dim arr() as String = {"Twenty","Thirty","Forty","Fifty","Sixty","Seventy","Eighty","Ninety"}
Return arr(n\10 -2) & " " & NumberToText(n Mod 10)

Case 100 to 199
Return "One Hundred " & NumberToText(n Mod 100)

Case 200 to 999
Return NumberToText(n\100) & "Hundreds " & NumberToText(n mod 100)

Case 1000 to 1999
Return "One Thousand " & NumberToText(n Mod 1000)

Case 2000 to 999999
Return NumberToText(n\1000) & "Thousands " & NumberToText(n Mod 1000)

Case 1000000 to 1999999
Return "One Million " & NumberToText(n Mod 1000000)

Case 1000000 to 999999999
Return NumberToText(n\1000000) & "Millions " & NumberToText(n Mod 1000000)

Case 1000000000 to 1999999999
Return "One Billion " & NumberTotext(n Mod 1000000000)

Case Else
Return NumberToText(n\1000000000) & "Billion " _
& NumberToText(n mod 1000000000)
End Select
End Function
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why massive lookup table?

string GetWrittenInteger(int n)
{
  string[] a = new string[] {"One", "Two", "Three", "Four", "Five", "Six", "Seven", "Eight", "Nine" }
  string[] b = new string[] { "Ten", "Eleven", "Twelve", "Thirteen", "Fourteen", "Fifteen", "Sixteen", "Seventeen", "Eighteen", "Nineteen" }
  string[] c = new string[] {"Twenty", "Thirty", "Forty", "Sixty", "Seventy", "Eighty", "Ninety"};
  string[] d = new string[] {"Hundred", "Thousand", "Million"}

  string s = n.ToString();
  for (int i = 0; i < s.Length; i++)
  {
    // logic (too lazy but you get the idea)
  }
}
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using System;
using System.Collections.Generic; 
using System.Linq; 
using System.Text; 
namespace tryingstartfror4digits 
{ 
class Program 
{ 
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Program pg=new Program();
        Console.WriteLine("Enter ur number");
        int num = Convert.ToInt32(Console.ReadLine());
        if (num <= 19)
        {
            string g = pg.first(num);
            Console.WriteLine("The number is " + g);
        }
        else if ((num >= 20) && (num <= 99))
        {
                if (num % 10 == 0)
                {
                    string g = pg.second(num / 10);
                    Console.WriteLine("The number is " + g);
                }
                else
                {
                    string g = pg.second(num / 10) + pg.first(num % 10);
                    Console.WriteLine("The number is " + g);
                }
          }
        else if((num>=100) && (num<=999))
        {
            int k = num % 100;
            string g = pg.first(num / 100) +pg.third(0) + pg.second(k / 10)+pg.first(k%10);
            Console.WriteLine("The number is " + g);
          }
        else if ((num >= 1000) && (num <= 19999))
        {
            int h=num%1000;
           int k=h%100;
            string g = pg.first(num / 1000) + "Thousand " + pg.first(h/ 100) + pg.third(k) + pg.second(k / 10) + pg.first(k % 10);
            Console.WriteLine("The number is " + g);
        }
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
     public string first(int num)
    {
        string name;
        if (num == 0)
        {
            name = " ";
        }
        else
        {
            string[] arr1 = new string[] { "One", "Two", "Three", "Four", "Five", "Six", "Seven", "Eight", "Nine" , "Ten", "Eleven", "Twelve", "Thirteen", "Fourteen", "Fifteen", "Sixteen", "Seventeen", "Eighteen", "Nineteen"};
            name = arr1[num - 1];
        }
        return name;
    }
    public string second(int num)
    {
        string name;
        if ((num == 0)||(num==1))
        {
         name = " ";
        }
        else
        {
            string[] arr1 = new string[] { "Twenty", "Thirty", "Forty", "Fifty", "Sixty", "Seventy", "Eighty", "Ninety" };
            name = arr1[num - 2];
        }
        return name;
    }
    public string third(int num)
    {
        string name ;
        if (num == 0)
        {
            name = "";
        }
        else
        {
            string[] arr1 = new string[] { "Hundred" };
            name = arr1[0];
        }
        return name;
    }

}
}

this works fine from 1 to 19999 will update soon after i complete it

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hope it works for evry one ...... –  Karthik Dec 4 '11 at 18:19

Here is a C# Console Application that will return whole numbers as well as decimals.

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