Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

If an array is empty, it looks like you can't check it's length using ".length". What's the best way to check if an array is empty?

share|improve this question

11 Answers 11

up vote 52 down vote accepted

You can absolutely check an empty array's length. However, if you try to do that on a null reference you'll get an exception. I suspect that's what you're running into. You can cope with both though:

if (array == null || array.Length == 0)

If that isn't the cause, please give a short but complete program demonstrating the problem. If that was the cause, it's worth taking a moment to make sure you understand null references vs "empty" collections/strings/whatever.

share|improve this answer
    
In what situation would an array have .Length == 0? An array dimensioned to size 0? –  sooprise Jul 9 '10 at 14:09
6  
...an empty array. –  David Neale Jul 9 '10 at 14:12
17  
The important thing to note about the code above is that in csharp, the or operator (||) is short circuiting. It sees that the array is null (statement is true) and does NOT attempt to evaluate the second statement. If it did, you'd still get a NullReferenceException and would have to nest your if statements. Not all languages are like this, VB.Net being one example. The default Or operator is NOT short-circuiting; they have OrElse for that. support.microsoft.com/kb/817250 –  Tim Coker Jul 9 '10 at 14:16
1  
@JeremyP: Yup, AndAlso. –  Jon Skeet Jul 9 '10 at 14:49
1  
Jon Skeet has spoken! –  RedAces Jan 22 at 15:59

Yeah, for safety I would probably do:

if(array == null || array.Length == 0)
share|improve this answer

You can use .Length == 0 if the length is empty and the array exists, but are you sure it's not null?

share|improve this answer

This is the best way. Please note Array is an object in NET so you need to check for null before.

share|improve this answer

As other have already suggested it is likely you are getting a NullReferenceException which can be avoided by first checking to see if the reference is null. However, you need to ask yourself whether that check is actually warranted. Would you be doing it because the reference really might be null and it being null has a special meaning in your code? Or would you be doing it to cover up a bug? The nature of the question leads me to believe it would be the latter. In which case you really need to examine the code in depth and figure out why that reference did not get initialized properly in the first place.

share|improve this answer

Jon Skeet answered correctly. Just remeber that the order of the test in the "IF" is important. Check for the null before the lenght. I also prefer to put the null on the left side of the equal...just a habit I got from Java that made the code more efficient and fast... I don't think it's important in a lot of application today, but it's good practice.

if(null == array || array.Length == 0)

share|improve this answer

You can use

if (array == null || array.Length == 0)

OR

if (!(array != null && array.Length >= 0))

NOTE!!!!! To insure that c# will implement the short circuit correctly; you have to compare that the object with NULL before you go to the children compare of the object.

share|improve this answer

Your suggested test is fine, so long as the array is intialised...

Martin.

share|improve this answer

if(array.length > 0)

share|improve this answer
2  
you could atleast say why you knocked this down... what's wrong with this? –  Wills Jul 9 '10 at 19:01

check if the array is null first so you would avoid a null pointer exception

logic in any language: if array is null or is empty :do ....

share|improve this answer

do you mean empty or null, two different things,

if the array is instantiated but empty, then length is correct, if it has not been instantiated then test vs null

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.