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Best suggestion will be the accepted answer

Class:

<?php 

class LogInfo {
    private $first_run;         // Flag to add line break at the beginning of script execution
    private $calling_script;    // Base name of the calling script
    private $log_file;          // log file path and name
    private $log_entry;         // information to be logged
    private $log_level;         // Log severity levels: error, warning, notice, info (default)
    private $log_level_arr;     // Array of accepted log levels
    private $fh;                // File handle

    private $file_name;         // File path and name
    private $file_parts;        // Array of $file_name
    private $script_name;       // Script Name
    private $script_parts;      // Array of $script_name    

    function __construct() {
        $this->first_run        = true;
        $this->log_level_arr    = array(
                                    'info'=>'info', // default
                                    'error'=>'error',
                                    'warning'=>'warning',
                                    'notice'=>'notice',
                                    );
        $this->calling_script   = '';       
        $this->log_file         = '';
        $this->log_entry        = '';
        $this->log_level        = '';
        $this->fh               = '';
        $this->file_name        = '';
        $this->file_parts       = '';
        $this->script_name      = '';
        $this->script_parts     = '';                   
    }

    /**
     * log detailed information into calling script log files
     */
    public function logInfo($info, $level = 'info') {

        if(array_key_exists($level,$this->log_level_arr)) {
            $this->log_level = $level;
        } else {
            $this->log_level = 'undefined';
        }

        $this->calling_script = $this->getScriptBaseName();
        $this->log_file = dirname(__FILE__)."/logs/".$this->calling_script.".log";
        $this->fh = fopen($this->log_file, 'a') or die("Can't open log file: ".$this->log_file);

        if($this->first_run) {
            $this->log_entry = "\n[" . date("Y-m-d H:i:s", mktime()) . "][" .$this->log_level."]:\t".$info."\n";
        } else {
            $this->log_entry = "[" . date("Y-m-d H:i:s", mktime()) . "][" .$this->log_level."]:\t".$info."\n";
        }

        fwrite($this->fh, $this->log_entry);
        fclose($this->fh);

        $this->first_run = false;
    }

    /**
     * return the base name of the calling script
     */
    private function getScriptBaseName() {
        $this->file_name    = $_SERVER["SCRIPT_NAME"];
        $this->file_parts   = explode('/', $this->file_name);
        $this->script_name  = $this->file_parts[count($this->file_parts) - 1];
        $this->script_parts = explode('.', $this->script_name);

        return $this->script_parts[0];
    }
}

?>

How to call:

$log = new LogInfo();

$txt = "This is comment";
$log->logInfo($txt." 1",'error');
$log->logInfo($txt." 2",'new');
$log->logInfo($txt." 3",'warning');
$log->logInfo($txt." 4",'notice');
$log->logInfo($txt." 5",'info');
$log->logInfo($txt." 6");
share|improve this question
4  
Why does everybody - myself included sometimes :p - always feel the need to reinvent the wheel? Have a look at Zend_Log. As for your source : since you don't lock your file when writing changes to it, it can get corrupted if 2 changes are logged at exactly the same time, even though the chance of that happening is very small (apparently Zend_Log has the same issue). –  wimvds Jul 9 '10 at 14:29
3  
@wimvds - good call. There is also a PEAR module for logging, aptly named "Log." pear.php.net/package/Log. This module does allow for file locking... –  thetaiko Jul 9 '10 at 14:32
1  
Not to mention log4php, though sadly it now seems to be a defunct project despite having been temporarily resurrected to place it under apache incubation –  Mark Baker Jul 9 '10 at 14:36
    
Thanks @thetaiko and @wimvds just wanted to make something simple and custom to fit my needs and better understand design/coding practices that others recommend –  Phill Pafford Jul 9 '10 at 14:38
1  
BTW Forget my remark about the log file getting corrupted, since you're using append mode (just like Zend_Log), fwrite calls are atomic (ie. there's no need to lock the file before writing). –  wimvds Jul 9 '10 at 14:48

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I would use separate methods for each log level, that would be easier to use.

$log->error($msg) for example.

share|improve this answer
    
so you would recommend creating a function for each log level? error(), info(), notice() and warning()? instead of just passing a flag? I do like the syntax on that as it would make more sense. $log->info($msg); –  Phill Pafford Jul 9 '10 at 14:18
    
using this suggestion, thnx –  Phill Pafford Jul 9 '10 at 14:19
3  
To add to this, you could call the logInfo() function from the error() function and use the flags there. That way you condense all your writing to a single function, but the syntax makes more sense. Also, if you do this, make the logInfo() function private. –  Joseph Jul 9 '10 at 14:29
2  
@Phill - Use of the magic __call method would allow you to call your different log levels without needing to explicitly define a separate method for each. You could validate against an array of acceptable levels, and provide a method allowing you to extend the list of levels dynamically at run time –  Mark Baker Jul 9 '10 at 15:20
    
Thanks for this answer as it provided the best solution I was looking for –  Phill Pafford Jul 9 '10 at 18:24

You may want to make this class implement an observable interface so you can attach it to other objects which can then use it to log events using the Observer pattern.

interface Observer
{
    function notify($sender);
}

interface Observable
{
    function addObserver(Observer $observer);
}

class LogInfo implements Observer
{
    // ...

    public function notify($obj)
    {
        $this->logInfo($obj->getMessage());
    }

    // ...
}

class DoesSomething implements Observable
{
    // ...

    protected $observers = array();
    protected $message;

    public function addObserver(Observer $observer)
    {
        $this->observers[] = $observer;
    }

    protected function notify($message)
    {
        $this->message = $message;
        if (count($this->observers))
        {
            foreach($this->observers as $observer)
            {
                $observer->notify($this);
            }
        }
    }

    public function getMessage()
    {
        return $this->message;
    }

    public function doSomething()
    {
         // ...
         $this->notify('We did something important');
    }

    // ...
}

$obj = new DoesSomething();
$obj ->addObserver(new LogInfo());
$obj ->doSomething(); // Uses LogInfo object to log event
share|improve this answer
    
interesting, I've never used the Observer functionality before. Thanks –  Phill Pafford Jul 9 '10 at 14:56
    
+1 Clever use of Observer pattern –  Mark Baker Jul 9 '10 at 15:09
    
you should add function getMessage(); to the Observable interface if you want do it right. –  Enrique Feb 4 '12 at 19:38

I will often add some static functions to a logger to make it more easily accessible without an instantiated object. Building on jishi's suggestion of different methods for each level:

public static function info($message) {
   // do logging here
}

LogInfo::info("I can log from anywhere");

Of course, there are certainly times and places where you don't want to access your logger using static functions. I generally find it easier though.

Another suggestion is to read in a configuration variable from somewhere that specifies a logging level. When you're building and very curious about exactly what is happening where, you can turn your logging level up from a central location (i.e. config.php or something).

Change your main log method to check that config variable before doing anything...

public static function info($message, $logLevel) {
    if(check_config("logLevel") >= $logLevel) {
        // do logging here
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
What is the benefits of using this: LogInfo::info("I can log from anywhere"); instead of this: $log->info("I can log from anywhere"); –  Phill Pafford Jul 9 '10 at 14:34
2  
The benefit is not having to declare a $log object. If you want to add logging functionality to 5 different functions, you will have to either pass in the already instantiated $log object or create a new one in each function. Instead, you can simply call your static log methods without declaring an object. –  thetaiko Jul 9 '10 at 14:56
    
I see, but how would I get the first_run functionality using this method? so each time the script runs I want to add a line break but keep all the other logging grouped together, any thoughts as I do like not having to declare a $log object all the time –  Phill Pafford Jul 9 '10 at 15:04
    
Make the first_run variable static as well. This variable will then belong to the class rather than to an instance. After you call a log function for the first time set the $first_run flag using self::first_run = false; –  thetaiko Jul 9 '10 at 15:12
    
Oops - self::first_run should be self::$first_run –  thetaiko Jul 9 '10 at 15:20

As jishi already stated, I would also separate the log-message-levels into own methods. These log-methods would be protected and only get invoked through one log-method which is public to use for the programmer.

Also I would add the possibility to add different types of writers. So that you can log the data into a file, database, send via email, and so on. I would realize this with dependecy-injection. If you need an example, about what I'm thinking of, just say it :)

EDIT

I'm home right now, and as promised I'm gonna provide some code:

/**
 * This is an interface for the writers. All writers must implement this,
 * to ensure, that they work together with the logger-class.
 */
interface logWriter
{
    public function log($message, $type);
}

/**
 * This is your logger-class. You call this class, if you want to log something,
 * just as you do it now.
 */
class logger
{
    /** This is the most important var. All writers that shall be used, are registered
     * in this array.
     */
     protected $_writers = array();

     // Here the other vars go, that you need for your logger, like config-vars and stuff
     // ...
     // ...

     /**
      * Your constructor, probably you'll use it to configure the logger...
      */
      public function __construct($config)
      {
        //.... do stuff...
      }

      /**
       * Okay with this method you register the different writers with your logger
       */
       public function registerWriter(logWriter $writer)
       {
            // Store the write into the array with all writers.
            $this->_writers[] = $writer;
       }

       /**
        * This is your normal log-method, just as you have one now
        */
       public function log($message, $type)
       {
            // Now you iterate over all registered writers and call the log-method of the writer...
            foreach($this->_writers AS $writer)
            {
                $writer->log($message, $type);
            }
       }
}

/**
 * This is a writer that sends the log message via email to you
 */
class emailWriter implements logWriter
{
    /**
     * Implement log-method from the logWriter-interface
     */
     public function log($message, $type)
     {
        // This is simplified right now. Should be more complex in the final version
        $to = 'yourmail@yourdomain.com';
        $from = 'logmessage@yourapplication.com';
        $subject = 'Log-Message of type' . $type;
        $body = $message;
        $headers = $from . "\r\n";
        mail($to, $subject, $body, $headers);
     }
}

/**
 * This is a writer that writes the message into a log-file
 */
class fileWriter implements logWriter
{
    /**
     * Implement log-method from the logWriter-interface
     */
     public function log($message, $type)
     {
        //... Here you just do the stuff that you would do: open file, write content, close, etc...
     }
}

// ...
// Here you can develop more writers like an SMS-Writer, Jabber-IM-Writer and so on
// ...

Okay now using this stuff:

$logger = new logger();

// Register the writers with the logger
$logger->registerWriter(new emailWriter());
$logger->registerWriter(new fileWriter());

// Now log something
$logger->log('This is a test-log-message', 'info');

Since we've registered the email- and fileWriter to the logger, the message will be written into a file andadditionally you'll get an email.If you only want to get an email and don't write the message into a file, only register the emailWriter with the logger-class

share|improve this answer
    
yes examples would be nice and thanx –  Phill Pafford Jul 9 '10 at 14:25
    
I am currently at the office and don't have the time to provide an example right now. I'll post one in about 2 hours, when I am home. Hope you can stand it this long :P –  faileN Jul 9 '10 at 14:30
    
log4php (based on log4j) implemented just such logging, so a FATAL in class XYZ could be SMSd to support staff for immediate attention, while FATAL in class ABC could be e-mailed to somebody, or ERROR in any class could be written to a straight log, and INFO could be written to a cyclic log, etc... all user configurable –  Mark Baker Jul 9 '10 at 15:28
    
@Phill Pafford: Okay I've updated my answer. Check it out. If you're common with OOP, it shouldn't be a problem to understand the basic approach ;) @Mark Baker: There are several frameworks providing the idea of different writers. I haven't head about "log4php", but I can say, that the Zend-Framework also includes this feature. –  faileN Jul 9 '10 at 16:55
    
Good example, I couyld see this being usefule for database classes and other things as well, does this pattern have a name that you know of? –  JasonDavis Jul 9 '11 at 23:31

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