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I have the following code:

var HD = function() { };

HD.Car = (function() {
    var _date = "09/07/2010";
    return {
        Make: undefined,
        Model: undefined,
        showMakeAndModel: function() {
            document.write(this.Make + " " + 
                           this.Model + 
                           " (data correct as of " + _date + ")");
            }
        };
    })();

var bert = new HD.Car();
bert.Make = "Ford";
bert.Model = "Capri";
window.onload = bert.showMakeAndModel();

And get the following error:

HD.Car is not a constructor

All I'm trying to do is test (to learn) the 'singleton pattern' with closure (for private members) so not a 'real' example, but the book I'm reading suggests this is the way to do it.

So a little confused - any help would be much appreciated.. Rob

share|improve this question
    
Apologies to anyone reading this page. I can't delete it although I want to now! Unfortunately a couple of the contributors have rendered this post unusable. I will post the same question again shortly if anyone still feels like helping. I will add the link here once an answer exists. MODERATORS - feel free to delete this post. –  LiverpoolsNumber9 Jul 9 '10 at 15:46
    
we've solved your problem and you say "contributors have rendered this post unusable"? –  galambalazs Jul 9 '10 at 17:23
    
galambalazs - yes you have all contributed to answering the question although it's not quite answered. Yours and David's answers are nearest to the mark. However the problem here is that this has turned into a discussion - Stack is not a discussion forum for the exact reason that people coming to the page after should not have to wade through a discussion (or argument in this case) to find the answer. That's why, in my opinion, this post is almost useless. Not your fault though mate, and I really appreciate your contribution. –  LiverpoolsNumber9 Jul 11 '10 at 8:55

5 Answers 5

You have some incorrect ()() around the HD.Car class definition. This fixed sample works:

var HD = function() { }; 

HD.Car = function() { 
    var _date = "09/07/2010"; 
    return { 
        Make: undefined, 
        Model: undefined, 
        showMakeAndModel: function() { 
            document.write(this.Make + " " +  
                           this.Model +  
                           " (data correct as of " + _date + ")"); 
            } 
        }; 
    }; 

var bert = new HD.Car(); 
bert.Make = "Ford"; 
bert.Model = "Capri"; 
window.onload = bert.showMakeAndModel();
share|improve this answer
    
Constructors shouldn't return anything. –  Luca Matteis Jul 9 '10 at 15:12
    
I agree, however, I believe he is using the pattern where return is used to ensure if it is accidently called as a function, it has the same result. –  David Jul 9 '10 at 15:13
    
Yes, but the attributes Make and Model you assign will not refer to the attributes of the HD.Car instance, rather they are just attributes of the bert namespace. –  Luca Matteis Jul 9 '10 at 15:18
    
Luca I think you might be on to something here as the intellisense (VS) is not picking up "bert.showMakeAndModel()" - however, firstly this does work, and secondly, "_date" works as a private member. I do need a solution where "bert.showMakeAndModel()" appears in intellisense though... –  LiverpoolsNumber9 Jul 9 '10 at 15:27
    
@LiverpoolsNumber9, I don't feel like helping you anymore, please read a book. –  Luca Matteis Jul 9 '10 at 15:39

For a bit more info:

How to write a singleton class in javascript.

Hopefully that will shed a bit more light for you!

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Terry :) –  LiverpoolsNumber9 Jul 9 '10 at 15:36

In JavaScript you can only use the new keyword with functions.

HD.Car is not a function, it's an object.

Just don't use new for your example.

share|improve this answer
    
How can I instansiate a new HD.Car object without the 'new' keyword? –  LiverpoolsNumber9 Jul 9 '10 at 15:30
    
@LiverpoolsNumber9 you can use new, and instansiate see my answer. –  galambalazs Jul 9 '10 at 15:37
    
I did - thank you. –  LiverpoolsNumber9 Jul 9 '10 at 15:50

Your error is coming from the fact that you're executing your constructor function, as indicated by the open and close parentheses after the declaration of HD.Car (and just before var bert). So, the function is executing and returning an object, which you're then trying to use with the "new" operator.

If you remove those parentheses, I believe you'll get the functionality you want.

share|improve this answer

Remove new, because it is only needed for constructor functions. Now HD.Car will be the object that an anonymous and self-executing function returns. Then remove parens after HD.Car. So it should look like:

var bert = HD.Car;

Now HD.Car is a singleton.

If you want it to be more like a factory you should do:

HD.Car = function() {
    var _date = "09/07/2010";
    return {
        Make: undefined,
        Model: undefined,
        showMakeAndModel: function() {
            document.write(this.Make + " " + 
                           this.Model + 
                           " (data correct as of " + _date + ")");
        }
   };
};​

var bert = new HD.Car();
share|improve this answer
    
HD.Car is not a regular function... it's an object. –  Luca Matteis Jul 9 '10 at 15:11
    
every function is an object. A regular function means that it is not a constructor function. Read before comment. –  galambalazs Jul 9 '10 at 15:15
    
no, a function is not an object. If you're referring to the ability of doing HD.something, this is possible because HD is simply a namespace, not because it's a function. In fact var HD = 3; HD.something = 4 will work also simply because JavaScript offers the ability to add attributes to namespaces, even if they're not objects. –  Luca Matteis Jul 9 '10 at 15:17
    
:) ok 2 things here. I've misread the code above I should correct. But your last statement is still false. Functions are objects in js... –  galambalazs Jul 9 '10 at 15:20
    
@galambalazs, again no, take a look at the typeof operator. –  Luca Matteis Jul 9 '10 at 15:22

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