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I want to create a rule to match only on the following:

<ul id="root">
   <li>
      <a href="item.html">Root Menu Item</a>
   </li>
</ul>

However it must not match if the "li" element contains another "ul" element:

<ul id="root">
   <li>
      <a href="#">Sub Menu</a>
      <ul>
         <li>
            <a href="item.html">Sub Menu Item</a>
        </li>
      </ul>
   </li>
</ul>

The event for the rule is a click() function on the "a" element, I have created the event as required but need it to only work on the root menu items.

I know I can just add an id attribute to target the desired element only but the menu plugin that my client has installed is not easily configurable.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 25 down vote accepted

If you're matching the a do this:

var result  = $('#root > li:not(:has(ul)) > a');

If you want to allow deeper nested <ul> elements, and just want to check to make sure only the direct children don't have a <ul>, you could do this:

var result  = $('#root > li:not(:has(> ul)) > a');

EDIT:

To have more than one selector at the same time, separate them with a comma inside the quotes:

var result  = $('#root > li:not(:has(> ul)) > a, #someOtherElement');
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Cheers, I'm matching on the "a" tag. This has worked perfectly. –  GSTAR Jul 9 '10 at 16:45
    
How can I do "OR" conditions for my click function, for example if I wanted to have the same click function for another tag? –  GSTAR Jul 9 '10 at 16:48
1  
@GSTAR - Glad it worked. I'm going to give one more update that will allow you to have deeper nested <ul> elements if needed. –  user113716 Jul 9 '10 at 16:48
1  
@GSTAR - You can separate selectors with a comma (inside the quotes). I'll update with an example. –  user113716 Jul 9 '10 at 16:51
1  
@GSTAR - I wasn't sure of your entire markup. It is probably not necessary in your case. Say if at the top level you had an <a> element that didn't have any <ul> siblings, but it did have a <div> sibling, and that <div> had a <ul> descendant, then with the first selector, the <a> would not be selected, because :has() searches deep into the descendants. So if you wanted that <a> to be selected given that scenario, you would use the second example I gave, because the :has() would only match <ul> elements that are direct descendants of the <li>. –  user113716 Jul 9 '10 at 17:19
$('#root a').click(function(e) {
    if ( $(this).parents('ul').length > 1 ) {
       e.preventDefault(); // cancel action for anchors inside of #root who have multiple parent list elements 
    }
});

Change logic per requirement.

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Cheers. Is e.preventDefault(); the same as return false;? Which is faster? –  GSTAR Jul 9 '10 at 16:45
1  
return false causes the function to cease. preventDefault is the standard DOM method. I would just use the latter, I would think return false is "faster" because you exit immediately whereas preventDefault still does some things internally. –  meder Jul 9 '10 at 16:49

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