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Does anyone have a trusted Proper Case or PCase algorithm (similar to a UCase or Upper)? I'm looking for something that takes a value such as "GEORGE BURDELL" or "george burdell" and turns it into "George Burdell".

I have a simple one that handles the simple cases. The ideal would be to have something that can handle things such as "O'REILLY" and turn it into "O'Reilly", but I know that is tougher.

I am mainly focused on the English language if that simplifies things.


UPDATE: I'm using C# as the language, but I can convert from almost anything (assuming like functionality exists).

I agree that the McDonald's scneario is a tough one. I meant to mention that along with my O'Reilly example, but did not in the original post.

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10 Answers 10

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Unless I've misunderstood your question I don't think you need to roll your own, the TextInfo class can do it for you.

using System.Globalization;

CultureInfo.InvariantCulture.TextInfo.ToTitleCase("GeOrGE bUrdEll")

Will return "George Burdell. And you can use your own culture if there's some special rules involved.

Update: Michael (in a comment to this answer) pointed out that this will not work if the input is all caps since the method will assume that it is an acronym. The naive workaround for this is to .ToLower() the text before submitting it to ToTitleCase.

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1  
Actually, this is incorrect. You example will return "GEORGE BURDELL" From the docs : Generally, title casing converts the first character of a word to uppercase and the rest of the characters to lowercase. However, a word that is entirely uppercase, such as an acronym, is not converted. –  user1684 Jan 23 '09 at 0:47
    
@Michael: Right you are... I guess the simple way of avoiding that would be to ensure that the input is lower-cased to begin with. I will update my answer to reflect this. –  Markus Olsson Jan 29 '09 at 15:38
    
The InvariantCulture is used for operations that require a cultural component but which do not match any actual human culture. Since the original poster is focused on an actual human language (English), it is necessary to use a culture object that is set to English. –  Windows programmer Aug 24 '10 at 4:18
1  
This will not handle O'Reilly type of things.. –  Jack0fshad0ws Oct 3 '13 at 22:51

@Zack: I'll post it as a separate reply.

Here's an example based on kronoz's post.

void Main()
{
    List<string> names = new List<string>() {
        "bill o'reilly", 
        "johannes diderik van der waals", 
        "mr. moseley-williams", 
        "Joe VanWyck", 
        "mcdonald's", 
        "william the third", 
        "hrh prince charles", 
        "h.r.m. queen elizabeth the third",
        "william gates, iii", 
        "pope leo xii",
        "a.k. jennings"
    };

    names.Select(name => name.ToProperCase()).Dump();
}

// Define other methods and classes here

// http://stackoverflow.com/questions/32149/does-anyone-have-a-good-proper-case-algorithm
public static class ProperCaseHelper {
    public static string ToProperCase(this string input) {
        if (IsAllUpperOrAllLower(input))
        {
            // fix the ALL UPPERCASE or all lowercase names
            return string.Join(" ", input.Split(' ').Select(word => wordToProperCase(word)));
        }
        else
        {
            // leave the CamelCase or Propercase names alone
            return input;
        }
    }

    public static bool IsAllUpperOrAllLower(this string input) {
        return (input.ToLower().Equals(input) || input.ToUpper().Equals(input) );
    }

    private static string wordToProperCase(string word) {
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(word)) return word;

        // Standard case
        string ret = capitaliseFirstLetter(word);

        // Special cases:
        ret = properSuffix(ret, "'");   // D'Artagnon, D'Silva
        ret = properSuffix(ret, ".");   // ???
        ret = properSuffix(ret, "-");       // Oscar-Meyer-Weiner
        ret = properSuffix(ret, "Mc");      // Scots
        ret = properSuffix(ret, "Mac");     // Scots

        // Special words:
        ret = specialWords(ret, "van");     // Dick van Dyke
        ret = specialWords(ret, "von");     // Baron von Bruin-Valt
        ret = specialWords(ret, "de");      
        ret = specialWords(ret, "di");      
        ret = specialWords(ret, "da");      // Leonardo da Vinci, Eduardo da Silva
        ret = specialWords(ret, "of");      // The Grand Old Duke of York
        ret = specialWords(ret, "the");     // William the Conqueror
        ret = specialWords(ret, "HRH");     // His/Her Royal Highness
        ret = specialWords(ret, "HRM");     // His/Her Royal Majesty
        ret = specialWords(ret, "H.R.H.");  // His/Her Royal Highness
        ret = specialWords(ret, "H.R.M.");  // His/Her Royal Majesty

        ret = dealWithRomanNumerals(ret);   // William Gates, III

        return ret;
    }

    private static string properSuffix(string word, string prefix) {
        if(string.IsNullOrEmpty(word)) return word;

        string lowerWord = word.ToLower();
        string lowerPrefix = prefix.ToLower();

        if (!lowerWord.Contains(lowerPrefix)) return word;

        int index = lowerWord.IndexOf(lowerPrefix);

        // If the search string is at the end of the word ignore.
        if (index + prefix.Length == word.Length) return word;

        return word.Substring(0, index) + prefix +
            capitaliseFirstLetter(word.Substring(index + prefix.Length));
    }

    private static string specialWords(string word, string specialWord)
    {
        if(word.Equals(specialWord, StringComparison.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase))
        {
            return specialWord;
        }
        else
        {
            return word;
        }
    }

    private static string dealWithRomanNumerals(string word)
    {
        List<string> ones = new List<string>() { "I", "II", "III", "IV", "V", "VI", "VII", "VIII", "IX" };
        List<string> tens = new List<string>() { "X", "XX", "XXX", "XL", "L", "LX", "LXX", "LXXX", "XC", "C" };
        // assume nobody uses hundreds

        foreach (string number in ones)
        {
            if (word.Equals(number, StringComparison.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase))
            {
                return number;
            }
        }

        foreach (string ten in tens)
        {
            foreach (string one in ones)
            {
                if (word.Equals(ten + one, StringComparison.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase))
                {
                    return ten + one;
                }
            }
        }

        return word;
    }

    private static string capitaliseFirstLetter(string word) {
        return char.ToUpper(word[0]) + word.Substring(1).ToLower();
    }

}
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1  
We put this into our production system. It took all of 15 minutes for one of our clients to ask why "Macey" was being set to "MacEy"... So we removed that particular line of code and left everything else. Thanks! –  Chris Lively Aug 15 '13 at 1:42
    
Thanks! Actually I know a Macey as well. Hmm... When I get some time I'll scrape the Wikipedia page on Scottish Gaelic names for all MiXeD case words, and add those in. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Scottish_Gaelic_surnames –  Colin Aug 22 '13 at 21:28

There's also this neat Perl script for title-casing text.

http://daringfireball.net/2008/08/title_case_update

But it sounds like by proper case you mean.. for people's names only.

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What programming language do you use? Many languages allow callback functions for regular expression matches. These can be used to propercase the match easily. The regular expression that would be used is quite simple, you just have to match all word characters, like so:

/\w+/

Alternatively, you can already extract the first character to be an extra match:

/(\w)(\w*)/

Now you can access the first character and successive characters in the match separately. The callback function can then simply return a concatenation of the hits. In pseudo Python (I don't actually know Python):

def make_proper(match):
    return match[1].to_upper + match[2]

Incidentally, this would also handle the case of “O'Reilly” because “O” and “Reilly” would be matched separately and both propercased. There are however other special cases that are not handled well by the algorithm, e.g. “McDonald's” or generally any apostrophed word. The algorithm would produce “Mcdonald'S” for the latter. A special handling for apostrophe could be implemented but that would interfere with the first case. Finding a thereotical perfect solution isn't possible. In practice, it might help considering the length of the part after the apostrophe.

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Here's a perhaps naive C# implementation:-

public class ProperCaseHelper {
  public string ToProperCase(string input) {
    string ret = string.Empty;

    var words = input.Split(' ');

    for (int i = 0; i < words.Length; ++i) {
      ret += wordToProperCase(words[i]);
      if (i < words.Length - 1) ret += " ";
    }

    return ret;
  }

  private string wordToProperCase(string word) {
    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(word)) return word;

    // Standard case
    string ret = capitaliseFirstLetter(word);

    // Special cases:
    ret = properSuffix(ret, "'");
    ret = properSuffix(ret, ".");
    ret = properSuffix(ret, "Mc");
    ret = properSuffix(ret, "Mac");

    return ret;
  }

  private string properSuffix(string word, string prefix) {
    if(string.IsNullOrEmpty(word)) return word;

    string lowerWord = word.ToLower(), lowerPrefix = prefix.ToLower();
    if (!lowerWord.Contains(lowerPrefix)) return word;

    int index = lowerWord.IndexOf(lowerPrefix);

    // If the search string is at the end of the word ignore.
    if (index + prefix.Length == word.Length) return word;

    return word.Substring(0, index) + prefix +
      capitaliseFirstLetter(word.Substring(index + prefix.Length));
  }

  private string capitaliseFirstLetter(string word) {
    return char.ToUpper(word[0]) + word.Substring(1).ToLower();
  }
}
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1  
@Colin: post your version as its own answer, don't edit someone else's answer so radically. –  Zack Jun 30 '11 at 17:51

a simple way to capitalise the first letter of each word (seperated by a space)

$words = explode(” “, $string);
for ($i=0; $i<count($words); $i++) {
$s = strtolower($words[$i]);
$s = substr_replace($s, strtoupper(substr($s, 0, 1)), 0, 1);
$result .= “$s “;
}
$string = trim($result);

in terms of catching the "O'REILLY" example you gave splitting the string on both spaces and ' would not work as it would capitalise any letter that appeared after a apostraphe i.e. the s in Fred's

so i would probably try something like

$words = explode(” “, $string);
for ($i=0; $i<count($words); $i++) {

$s = strtolower($words[$i]);

if (substr($s, 0, 2) === "o'"){
$s = substr_replace($s, strtoupper(substr($s, 0, 3)), 0, 3);
}else{
$s = substr_replace($s, strtoupper(substr($s, 0, 1)), 0, 1);
}
$result .= “$s “;
}
$string = trim($result);

This should catch O'Reilly, O'Clock, O'Donnell etc hope it helps

Please note this code is untested.

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You do not mention which language you would like the solution in so here is some pseudo code.

Loop through each character
    If the previous character was an alphabet letter
        Make the character lower case
    Otherwise
        Make the character upper case
End loop
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Kronoz, thank you. I found in your function that the line:

`if (!lowerWord.Contains(lowerPrefix)) return word`;

must say

if (!lowerWord.StartsWith(lowerPrefix)) return word;

so "información" is not changed to "InforMacIón"

best,

Enrique

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I use this as the textchanged event handler of text boxes. Support entry of "McDonald"

Public Shared Function DoProperCaseConvert(ByVal str As String, Optional ByVal allowCapital As Boolean = True) As String
    Dim strCon As String = ""
    Dim wordbreak As String = " ,.1234567890;/\-()#$%^&*€!~+=@"
    Dim nextShouldBeCapital As Boolean = True

    'Improve to recognize all caps input
    'If str.Equals(str.ToUpper) Then
    '    str = str.ToLower
    'End If

    For Each s As Char In str.ToCharArray

        If allowCapital Then
            strCon = strCon & If(nextShouldBeCapital, s.ToString.ToUpper, s)
        Else
            strCon = strCon & If(nextShouldBeCapital, s.ToString.ToUpper, s.ToLower)
        End If

        If wordbreak.Contains(s.ToString) Then
            nextShouldBeCapital = True
        Else
            nextShouldBeCapital = False
        End If
    Next

    Return strCon
End Function
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Is there a reason for word breaks to include Mexican pesos, American dollars, and Irish euro, but not English pounds? Is there a reason for word breaks not to include underscores? –  Windows programmer Aug 24 '10 at 4:22
    
simply NO. You can put any of those characters there in the array. Although if it's sarcasm you are after I don't think it can be put in there. –  Dasiths Aug 26 '10 at 1:56

I wrote this today to implement in an app I'm working on. I think this code is pretty self explanatory with comments. It's not 100% accurate in all cases but it will handle most of your western names easily.

Examples:

mary-jane => Mary-Jane

o'brien => O'Brien

Joël VON WINTEREGG => Joël von Winteregg

jose de la acosta => Jose de la Acosta

The code is extensible in that you may add any string value to the arrays at the top to suit your needs. Please study it and add any special feature that may be required.

function name_title_case($str)
{
  // name parts that should be lowercase in most cases
  $ok_to_be_lower = array('av','af','da','dal','de','del','der','di','la','le','van','der','den','vel','von');
  // name parts that should be lower even if at the beginning of a name
  $always_lower   = array('van', 'der');

  // Create an array from the parts of the string passed in
  $parts = explode(" ", mb_strtolower($str));

  foreach ($parts as $part)
  {
    (in_array($part, $ok_to_be_lower)) ? $rules[$part] = 'nocaps' : $rules[$part] = 'caps';
  }

  // Determine the first part in the string
  reset($rules);
  $first_part = key($rules);

  // Loop through and cap-or-dont-cap
  foreach ($rules as $part => $rule)
  {
    if ($rule == 'caps')
    {
      // ucfirst() words and also takes into account apostrophes and hyphens like this:
      // O'brien -> O'Brien || mary-kaye -> Mary-Kaye
      $part = str_replace('- ','-',ucwords(str_replace('-','- ', $part)));
      $c13n[] = str_replace('\' ', '\'', ucwords(str_replace('\'', '\' ', $part)));
    }
    else if ($part == $first_part && !in_array($part, $always_lower))
    {
      // If the first part of the string is ok_to_be_lower, cap it anyway
      $c13n[] = ucfirst($part);
    }
    else
    {
      $c13n[] = $part;
    }
  }

  $titleized = implode(' ', $c13n);

  return trim($titleized);
}
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