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I have a cron "time definition"

1 * * * * (every hour at xx:01)
2 5 * * * (every day at 05:02)
0 4 3 * * (every third day of the month at 04:00)
* 2 * * 5 (every minute between 02:00 and 02:59 on fridays)

And I have an unix timestamp.

Is there an obvious way to find (calculate) the next time (after that given timestamp) the job is due to be executed?

I'm using PHP, but the problem should be fairly language-agnostic.

[Update]

The class "PHP Cron Parser" (suggested by Ray) calculates the LAST time the CRON job was supposed to be executed, not the next time.

To make it easier: In my case the cron time parameters are only absolute, single numbers or "*". There are no time-ranges and no "*/5" intervals.

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7 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

This is basically doing the reverse of checking if the current time fits the conditions. so something like:

//Totaly made up language
next = getTimeNow();
next.addMinutes(1) //so that next is never now
done = false;
while (!done) {
  if (cron.minute != '*' && next.minute != cron.minute) {
    if (next.minute > cron.minute) {
      next.addHours(1);
    }
    next.minute = cron.minute;
  }
  if (cron.hour != '*' && next.hour != cron.hour) {
    if (next.hour > cron.hour) {
      next.hour = cron.hour;
      next.addDays(1);
      next.minute = 0;
      continue;
    }
    next.hour = cron.hour;
    next.minute = 0;
    continue;
  }
  if (cron.weekday != '*' && next.weekday != cron.weekday) {
    deltaDays = cron.weekday - next.weekday //assume weekday is 0=sun, 1 ... 6=sat
    if (deltaDays < 0) { deltaDays+=7; }
    next.addDays(deltaDays);
    next.hour = 0;
    next.minute = 0;
    continue;
  }
  if (cron.day != '*' && next.day != cron.day) {
    if (next.day > cron.day || !next.month.hasDay(cron.day)) {
      next.addMonths(1);
      next.day = 1; //assume days 1..31
      next.hour = 0;
      next.minute = 0;
      continue;
    }
    next.day = cron.day
    next.hour = 0;
    next.minute = 0;
    continue;
  }
  if (cron.month != '*' && next.month != cron.month) {
    if (next.month > cron.month) {
      next.addMonths(12-next.month+cron.month)
      next.day = 1; //assume days 1..31
      next.hour = 0;
      next.minute = 0;
      continue;
    }
    next.month = cron.month;
    next.day = 1;
    next.hour = 0;
    next.minute = 0;
    continue;
  }
  done = true;
}

I might have written that a bit backwards. Also it can be a lot shorter if in every main if instead of doing the greater than check you merely increment the current time grade by one and set the lesser time grades to 0 then continue; however then you'll be looping a lot more. Like so:

//Shorter more loopy version
next = getTimeNow().addMinutes(1);
while (true) {
  if (cron.month != '*' && next.month != cron.month) {
    next.addMonths(1);
    next.day = 1;
    next.hour = 0;
    next.minute = 0;
    continue;
  }
  if (cron.day != '*' && next.day != cron.day) {
    next.addDays(1);
    next.hour = 0;
    next.minute = 0;
    continue;
  }
  if (cron.weekday != '*' && next.weekday != cron.weekday) {
    next.addDays(1);
    next.hour = 0;
    next.minute = 0;
    continue;
  }
  if (cron.hour != '*' && next.hour != cron.hour) {
    next.addHours(1);
    next.minute = 0;
    continue;
  }
  if (cron.minute != '*' && next.minute != cron.minute) {
    next.addMinutes(1);
    continue;
  }
  break;
}
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dlamblin: does your second version have a loop invariant? Obviously what it is doing is getting closer and closer to the result. But I'm trying to prove its correctness to myself and I can't figure out what the loop invariant would be. –  eeeeaaii Dec 16 '11 at 19:00
    
Guess what? There is no loop invariant -- because it's not really a loop! It's basically a series of goto statement masquerading as a loop. To prove this, note that you could replace the while(true) with a do {...} while (false). –  eeeeaaii Dec 16 '11 at 21:06
    
actually no because "continue" actually jumps to the end of a loop, not the beginning. At least in java. So you still have to say do {...; break; } while (true) –  eeeeaaii Dec 16 '11 at 23:58
    
your "something like" code worked flawlessly for me :) But be careful, you should break the loop in case of exact match is not available to prevent infinite loop. –  Mehmet Fide Apr 26 at 18:45
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Here's a PHP project that is based on dlamblin's psuedo code.

It can calculate the next run date of a CRON expression, the previous run date of a CRON expression, and determine if a CRON expression matches a given time. You can skip This CRON expression parser fully implements CRON:

  1. Increments of ranges (e.g. */12, 3-59/15)
  2. Intervals (e.g. 1-4, MON-FRI, JAN-MAR )
  3. Lists (e.g. 1,2,3 | JAN,MAR,DEC)
  4. Last day of a month (e.g. L)
  5. Last given weekday of a month (e.g. 5L)
  6. Nth given weekday of a month (e.g. 3#2, 1#1, MON#4)
  7. Closest weekday to a given day of the month (e.g. 15W, 1W, 30W)

https://github.com/mtdowling/cron-expression

Usage (PHP 5.3+):

<?php

// Works with predefined scheduling definitions
$cron = Cron\CronExpression::factory('@daily');
$cron->isDue();
$cron->getNextRunDate();
$cron->getPreviousRunDate();

// Works with complex expressions
$cron = Cron\CronExpression::factory('15 2,6-12 */15 1 2-5');
$cron->getNextRunDate();
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hey dude. what in here is 5.3 dependent? no chance for 5.2.10 support? –  onassar Aug 19 '10 at 22:41
2  
This could be ported to 5.2.x, but you'd need to remove the namespaces, DateTime::add() calls, and the DateInterval references. –  Michael Dowling Aug 25 '10 at 13:24
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For anyone interested, here's my final PHP implementation, which pretty much equals dlamblin pseudo code:

class myMiniDate {
	var $myTimestamp;
	static private $dateComponent = array(
									'second' => 's',
									'minute' => 'i',
									'hour' => 'G',
									'day' => 'j',
									'month' => 'n',
									'year' => 'Y',
									'dow' => 'w',
									'timestamp' => 'U'
								  );
	static private $weekday = array(
								1 => 'monday',
								2 => 'tuesday',
								3 => 'wednesday',
								4 => 'thursday',
								5 => 'friday',
								6 => 'saturday',
								0 => 'sunday'
							  );

	function __construct($ts = NULL) { $this->myTimestamp = is_null($ts)?time():$ts; }

	function __set($var, $value) {
		list($c['second'], $c['minute'], $c['hour'], $c['day'], $c['month'], $c['year'], $c['dow']) = explode(' ', date('s i G j n Y w', $this->myTimestamp));
		switch ($var) {
			case 'dow':
				$this->myTimestamp = strtotime(self::$weekday[$value], $this->myTimestamp);
				break;

			case 'timestamp':
				$this->myTimestamp = $value;
				break;

			default:
				$c[$var] = $value;
				$this->myTimestamp = mktime($c['hour'], $c['minute'], $c['second'], $c['month'], $c['day'], $c['year']);
		}
	}


	function __get($var) {
		return date(self::$dateComponent[$var], $this->myTimestamp);
	}

	function modify($how) { return $this->myTimestamp = strtotime($how, $this->myTimestamp); }
}


$cron = new myMiniDate(time() + 60);
$cron->second = 0;
$done = 0;

echo date('Y-m-d H:i:s') . '<hr>' . date('Y-m-d H:i:s', $cron->timestamp) . '<hr>';

$Job = array(
			'Minute' => 5,
			'Hour' => 3,
			'Day' => 13,
			'Month' => null,
			'DOW' => 5,
	   );

while ($done < 100) {
	if (!is_null($Job['Minute']) && ($cron->minute != $Job['Minute'])) {
		if ($cron->minute > $Job['Minute']) {
			$cron->modify('+1 hour');
		}
		$cron->minute = $Job['Minute'];
	}
	if (!is_null($Job['Hour']) && ($cron->hour != $Job['Hour'])) {
		if ($cron->hour > $Job['Hour']) {
			$cron->modify('+1 day');
		}
		$cron->hour = $Job['Hour'];
		$cron->minute = 0;
	}
	if (!is_null($Job['DOW']) && ($cron->dow != $Job['DOW'])) {
		$cron->dow = $Job['DOW'];
		$cron->hour = 0;
		$cron->minute = 0;
	}
	if (!is_null($Job['Day']) && ($cron->day != $Job['Day'])) {
		if ($cron->day > $Job['Day']) {
			$cron->modify('+1 month');
		}
		$cron->day = $Job['Day'];
		$cron->hour = 0;
		$cron->minute = 0;
	}
	if (!is_null($Job['Month']) && ($cron->month != $Job['Month'])) {
		if ($cron->month > $Job['Month']) {
			$cron->modify('+1 year');
		}
		$cron->month = $Job['Month'];
		$cron->day = 1;
		$cron->hour = 0;
		$cron->minute = 0;
	}

	$done = (is_null($Job['Minute']) || $Job['Minute'] == $cron->minute) &&
			(is_null($Job['Hour']) || $Job['Hour'] == $cron->hour) &&
			(is_null($Job['Day']) || $Job['Day'] == $cron->day) &&
			(is_null($Job['Month']) || $Job['Month'] == $cron->month) &&
			(is_null($Job['DOW']) || $Job['DOW'] == $cron->dow)?100:($done+1);
}

echo date('Y-m-d H:i:s', $cron->timestamp) . '<hr>';
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1  
Should be noted that this only works with crons that aren't complex ie. simple - 30 8 5 7 1, complex - * 2-4,8,10 * 7-8 * –  buggedcom Jul 5 '10 at 2:26
    
I just realized I forgot all about lists and ranges in my example code. –  dlamblin Dec 17 '11 at 22:23
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Check this out:

It can calculate the next time a scheduled job is supposed to be run based on the given cron definitions.
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Actually that class calculates the last time the job WAS due. I need to find the next time the job IS GOING to be due :( –  BlaM Nov 26 '08 at 17:48
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Use this function:

function parse_crontab($time, $crontab)
         {$time=explode(' ', date('i G j n w', strtotime($time)));
          $crontab=explode(' ', $crontab);
          foreach ($crontab as $k=>&$v)
                  {$v=explode(',', $v);
                   foreach ($v as &$v1)
                           {$v1=preg_replace(array('/^\*$/', '/^\d+$/', '/^(\d+)\-(\d+)$/', '/^\*\/(\d+)$/'),
                                             array('true', '"'.$time[$k].'"==="\0"', '(\1<='.$time[$k].' and '.$time[$k].'<=\2)', $time[$k].'%\1===0'),
                                             $v1
                                            );
                           }
                   $v='('.implode(' or ', $v).')';
                  }
          $crontab=implode(' and ', $crontab);
          return eval('return '.$crontab.';');
         }
var_export(parse_crontab('2011-05-04 02:08:03', '*/2,3-5,9 2 3-5 */2 *'));
var_export(parse_crontab('2011-05-04 02:08:03', '*/8 */2 */4 */5 *'));

Edit Maybe this is more readable:

<?php

    function parse_crontab($frequency='* * * * *', $time=false) {
        $time = is_string($time) ? strtotime($time) : time();
        $time = explode(' ', date('i G j n w', $time));
        $crontab = explode(' ', $frequency);
        foreach ($crontab as $k => &$v) {
            $v = explode(',', $v);
            $regexps = array(
                '/^\*$/', # every 
                '/^\d+$/', # digit 
                '/^(\d+)\-(\d+)$/', # range
                '/^\*\/(\d+)$/' # every digit
            );
            $content = array(
                "true", # every
                "{$time[$k]} === 0", # digit
                "($1 <= {$time[$k]} && {$time[$k]} <= $2)", # range
                "{$time[$k]} % $1 === 0" # every digit
            );
            foreach ($v as &$v1)
                $v1 = preg_replace($regexps, $content, $v1);
            $v = '('.implode(' || ', $v).')';
        }
        $crontab = implode(' && ', $crontab);
        return eval("return {$crontab};");
    }

Usage:

<?php
if (parse_crontab('*/5 2 * * *')) {
    // should run cron
} else {
    // should not run cron
}
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A little extra explanation might help –  dlamblin Dec 17 '11 at 22:25
2  
this is actually super brilliant.. it basically takes a timestamp and a cron frequency * 2 5 * 3 as arguments, splits up the timestamp into minute, hour, day of month, month number, day of week, splits up the cron frequency, checks each part of the cron frequency and replaces it with the appropriate time and comparison. This whole thing generates a string that basically looks like (true) and (true) and (true) and ("4"==="2") and (true), then evals it to return a boolean. If the boolean is true, the cron is supposed to run, else it can be ignored. –  tester Apr 18 '13 at 22:02
    
The second part of $content should be "{$time[$k]} === $0", # digit, using $0 instead of 0. Thanks tester for pointing out that this answer is a smart way to do it. I might have overlooked it otherwise. Also, thanks for the edit for readability. –  Mnebuerquo Apr 1 at 20:14
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Created javascript API for calculating next run time based on @dlamblin idea. Supports seconds and years. Have not managed to test it fully yet so expect bugs but let me know if find any.

Repository link: https://bitbucket.org/nevity/cronner

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Shouldn't it be

$content = array(
            "true", # every
            "{$time[$k]} === $0", # digit
            "($0 <= {$time[$k]} && {$time[$k]} <= $1)", # range
            "{$time[$k]} % $0 === 0" # every digit
        );

in the replacement array ?

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