Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

We've been bitten by the following bug many times:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>

using namespace std;

void print(int* pn) { cout << *pn << " "; }

int main() {
    int* n1 = new int(1);
    int* n2 = new int(2);
    int* n3 = new int(3);

    vector<int*> v;
    v.push_back(n1);
    v.push_back(n2);
    v.push_back(n3);

    sort(v.begin(), v.end());   // Here be dragons!

    for_each(v.begin(), v.end(), print);
    cout << endl;
    delete n1; delete n2; delete n3;
}

The problem is that std::sort is comparing integer pointers not integers, which is not what the programmer intended. Worse, the output may appear correct and deterministic (consider the order of addresses returned by new or allocated on the stack). The root problem is that sort eventually calls operator< for T, which is rarely a good idea when T is a pointer type.

Is there any way to prevent this or at least get a compiler warning? For example, is there a way to create a custom version of std::sort that requires a comparison function when T is a pointer?

share|improve this question
1  
We've all been bitten by this bug many times. That's why I was interested in this question. I don't think anyone has really cracked it, though. What we need is something to ensure this sort of thing doesn't compile, so when you do it after another all-nighter, it can't get left in the code. –  Brian Hooper Jul 9 '10 at 18:42
    
Every time I try to come up with something useful to say here, it all boils down to "get smarter developers". Then I realize that simple things like this happen to smart developers too. Definitely keep notes (wiki?) on the "most wanted" of bugs that show up on your code, and pay extra attention to them during code reviews. Doubly so on junior developers. –  corsiKa Jul 9 '10 at 19:28

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

For pointers in general you could do this:

    #include <ctime>
    #include <vector>
    #include <cstdlib>
    #include <algorithm>
    #include <functional>
    #include <type_traits>

    namespace util {
        struct sort_pointers {
            bool operator() ( int *a, int *b ) {
                return *a < *b;
            }
        };

        template <typename T, bool is_pointer = !std::tr1::is_pointer<T>::value>
        struct sort_helper {
            typedef std::less<T> wont_compare_pointers;
        };

        template <typename T>
        struct sort_helper<T,false> {
        };

        template <typename Iterator>
        void sort( Iterator start, Iterator end )
        {
            std::sort( start,
                       end,
                       sort_helper
                       <
                            typename Iterator::value_type
                       >::wont_compare_pointers() );
        }

        template <typename Iterator, class Func>
        void sort( Iterator start, Iterator end, Func f ) {
            std::sort( start, end, f );
        }
    }

    int main() {
        std::vector<int> v1;
        std::vector<int*> v2;
        srand(time(0));

        for( int i = 0; i < 10; ++i ) {
            v1.push_back(rand());
        }

        util::sort( v1.begin(), v1.end() );

        for( int i = 0; i < 10; ++i ) {
            v2.push_back(&v1[i]);
        }

        /* util::sort( v2.begin(), v2.end() ); */ //fails.
        util::sort( v2.begin(), v2.end(), util::sort_pointers() );

        return 0;
    }

std::tr1::is_pointer was just what it was called in Visual Studio 2008, but I think Boost has one too, and newer compiles might provide it as std::is_pointer. I'm sure someone would be able to write a prettier solution, but this appears to work.

But I must say, I agree with cogwheel, there is no reason for this, the programmer should be able to see if this is going to be a problem and act accordingly.

Addition:

You can generalize it a bit more I think, to automatically select a functor that will dereference the pointers and compare the values:

namespace util {
    template <typename T>
    struct sort_pointers {
        bool operator() ( T a, T b ) {
            return *a < *b;
        }
    };

    template <typename T, bool is_pointer = !std::tr1::is_pointer<T>::value>
    struct sort_helper {
        typedef std::less<T> compare;
    };

    template <typename T>
    struct sort_helper<T,false> {
        typedef sort_pointers<T> compare;
    };

    template <typename Iterator>
    void sort( Iterator start, Iterator end )
    {
        std::sort( start,
                   end,
                   sort_helper
                   <
                        typename Iterator::value_type
                   >::compare() );
    }
}

That way you don't have to think about if you're providing it with pointers to compare or not, it will automatically be sorted out.

share|improve this answer
    
Very nice! I modified sort_pointers::op< to return "std::dont_compare_pointers" similar to Nicholas so the developer gets a compile error and is forced to supply a comparator. Now I need to create a modified version of STL that uses this trick for all comparisons (sort, map::insert, etc.). –  Marc Eaddy Jul 10 '10 at 1:09

IMO, the programmers should know that std::sort assumes the container stores values. If you need a different behavior for the comparison, then you provide a comparison function. E.g. (untested):

template<typename T>
inline bool deref_compare(T* t1, T* t2) { return *t1 < *t2; }

//...

std::sort(v.begin(), v.end(), deref_compare<int>);

Edit

FWIW, Jacob's answer comes closest to directly accomplishing what you want. There might be some ways to generalize it further.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry for all the edits. I keep thinking it's working and then it's not. I should just stick with my original answer for now. –  Cogwheel Jul 9 '10 at 18:06
    
The problem is sometimes developers forget to supply the comparison function. For example, they modify the container to store by-pointer instead of by-value but forget to update all the sort calls. –  Marc Eaddy Jul 10 '10 at 1:04
    
Yeah, that's why i gave my endorsement to Jacob's post. :) FWIW, I have to wonder whether you'll have to remind people not to use std::sort as often as you have to remind them to be more careful when they do ;) –  Cogwheel Jul 10 '10 at 1:32

I don't have a good answer for pointers in general, but you can restrict comparisons if you're using a smart pointer of any kind - eg boost::shared_ptr.

#include <boost/shared_ptr.hpp>
using namespace std;

template<class T>
bool operator<(boost::shared_ptr<T> a, boost::shared_ptr<T> b)
{
  return boost::shared_ptr<T>::dont_compare_pointers;
}

int main () {
  boost::shared_ptr<int> A;
  boost::shared_ptr<int> B;
  bool i = A < B;  
}

Output:

In function 'bool operator<(boost::shared_ptr<T>, boost::shared_ptr<T>) [with T = int]':
t.cpp:15:   instantiated from here
Line 8: error: 'dont_compare_pointers' is not a member of 'boost::shared_ptr<int>'
compilation terminated due to -Wfatal-errors.

So you can use smart pointers, or create your own smart pointer wrapper. This is very heavyweight for what you want though, so if you do create a wrapper to detect this situation, I recommend you only use it in debug mode. So create a macro (ugh, I know) and use it to declare pointers.

#ifdef DEBUG
    #define pointer(x) pointer_wrapper<X>
#else
    #define pointer(x) x*
#endif

This still requires your programmers to use it, of course!

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.