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I'll prefix by saying that I understand that both Code Analysis and StyleCop are meant as guidelines, and many people chose to ignore these anyway. But having said that, I'd like to see what the general consensus is with regard to these two rules.

Rule CA1500 says don't make parameter names and private field names the same.

Rule SA1309, on the other hand, says don't prefix members with underscore or "m_".

This leaves us with little options for distinguishing private backing fields from their corresponding parameters. Take these examples.

SA1309 complains:

class SomeClass
{
    int _someField;

    public SomeClass(int someField)
    {
        this._someField = someField;
    }
}

CA1500 complains:

class SomeClass
{
    int someField;

    public SomeClass(int someField)
    {
        this.someField = someField;
    }
}

What options do I have? I don't want to make the private backing field PascalCase, because this is the (I believe fairly universal) convention for public fields/properties. And I don't want to rename one or the other, just for the sake of resolving ambiguity.

So I'm left with one of the above two, which would require me to suppress one of the SA/CA rules.

What do you guys typically do? And more importantly, what do the authors of these rules think you should do (as neither provide alternative solutions in their documentation)?

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your first example won't compile, the names are messed up :) –  µBio Jul 9 '10 at 18:17
    
I normally violate CA1500. But I only have Pro, with no TFS, so I never see the warning. :) –  Stephen Cleary Jul 9 '10 at 18:17
    
@yetapb - Thanks, fixed. :) –  Jerad Rose Jul 9 '10 at 18:25
    
I violate CA1500 all the time but never got a warning so far although it is CA1500 enabled. Is there something magical about this rule? –  Albic Jul 9 '10 at 18:31
    
@Albic - Same here, seems we just started getting the warning. And we've always gone the way of the second example. We did recently go from FxCop 1.36 to Code Analysis in VS2010, but I don't think this is a new rule. I'm not sure. –  Jerad Rose Jul 9 '10 at 18:42

5 Answers 5

up vote 16 down vote accepted

We turn off SA1309. The reasoning behind it is fairly weak.

Our team feels that the well-accepted practice of private members starting with underscores far outweighs the idea that someone might use a different editor on the code, which never happens in our shop anyway. As to providing an "immediate differentiation", the underscore does that as well.

If you really have developers that still use "m_" though and you still need to check for that, you could write a quick rule for just that.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this seems to be the most logical approach. –  Jerad Rose Jul 9 '10 at 19:10

Here is my usual solution:

class SomeClass
{
    int SomeField{get;set;}

    public SomeClass(int someField)
    {
        SomeField = someField;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I also use auto-implemented properties when possible (which is most of the time), but there are cases where I have private fields without exposing them as public properties. –  Jerad Rose Jul 9 '10 at 18:28
    
For the cases where you can't use an auto-implemented property, maybe a more descriptive member variable would be useful, thus avoiding the CA clash with the parameter name. –  Dan Sep 30 '10 at 2:28

Based on what I've seen from Microsoft themselves, I say CA1500 wins.

If you look at the BCL, most of the code prefixes local fields with an underscore.

share|improve this answer
    
But is that old code? Conventions were being invented while the BCL was written. –  Stephen Cleary Jul 9 '10 at 18:19
    
@Stephen Cleary - I've seen it in code as new as 3.5. –  Justin Niessner Jul 9 '10 at 18:20
    
and I've read code in the BCL that I would chastise programmers for writing... :) Just sayin', just because someone inside Microsoft does it doesn't mean it's right - or even recommended by Microsoft as a whole. –  Stephen Cleary Jul 9 '10 at 18:41
    
@Stephen Cleary - That's been my thinking as well. I see very inconsistent practices come out of there, and try not to use their code as the holy grail of best practices. –  Jerad Rose Jul 9 '10 at 19:05
1  
StyleCop sort of trumps the BCL or "Framework Design Guidelines" style. Basically the BCL code and the book were written by C++ devs and they are keeping the style consistent within the BCL. StyleCop is for C#. C# developed its own style over the years and StyleCop reflects that. blogs.msdn.com/b/sourceanalysis/archive/2008/05/25/… –  AllenSanborn Aug 17 '11 at 15:29

The only alternative I can think of that seems like it would satisfy both rules and that I have actually seen used anywhere is something like the following. I don't follow this convention myself, as it seems clumsy.

public class Class1
{
    // prefix private fields with "m"
    private int mValue1;

    public int Value1
    {
        get { return mValue1; }
        set { mValue1 = value; }
    }

    private string mValue2;

    public string Value2
    {
        get { return mValue2; }
        set { mValue2 = value; }
    }

    // prefix parameters with "p"
    public bool PerformAction(int pValue1, string pValue2)
    {
        if (pValue1 > mValue1)
        {
            mValue2 = pValue2;
            return true;
        }
        else
        {
            return (mValue2 == pValue2);
        }
    }
}
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1  
That will break SA1305 “FieldNamesMustNotUseHungarianNotation”. This link shows how to modify StyleCop to allow certain prefixes. The content is also in the StyleCop help. –  AllenSanborn Aug 17 '11 at 15:23

There's no conflict. Change the parameter name.

public class SomeClass
{
    private int namedField { get; set; }

    public SomeClass(int differentlyNamedField)
    {
        this.namedField = differentlyNamedField;
    }
}
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