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Possible Duplicate:
Close and Dispose - which to call?

Hi,

After reading some web pages, I still don't understand the difference between Dispose and Close methods in C#.

Let's take a sample:

using (SqlConnection sqlConnection = new SqlConnection())
{
    // Execute an insert statement (no breaks, exceptions, returns, etc.)
}

and a second one:

SqlConnection sqlConnection = new SqlConnection();
// Execute an insert statement (no breaks, exceptions, returns, etc.)
sqlConnection.Close();

Are those two pieces of code similar? Are both available only for convenience (since there are situations where using is not a solution? Or there is a difference in the behavior?

So why some classes provide Close method and when should I put a Close method in IDisposable classes I create?

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marked as duplicate by Rubens Farias, womp, Mark Byers, Jose Basilio, MainMa Jul 9 '10 at 22:28

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

4  
Duplicate stackoverflow.com/questions/61092/… –  chilltemp Jul 9 '10 at 22:11
    
Thanks to note that it is a duplicate. I searched before posting, but didn't found it. I'm closing the question. –  MainMa Jul 9 '10 at 22:28
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your two code snippets are equivalent.

.NET classes that implement IDisposable and expose Close, do it juts for the added convenience of having a Close method that has a slightly friendlier name. Typically one calls the other.

If you implement your own disposable class, you won't need to add a Close method, unless you like to have one.

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This is almost correct. Dispose and Close are the same except for database connection classes. –  Stephen Cleary Jul 9 '10 at 22:38
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