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I want a long-running process to return its progress over a Queue (or something similar) which I will feed to a progress bar dialog. I also need the result when the process is completed. A test example here fails with a RuntimeError: Queue objects should only be shared between processes through inheritance.

import multiprocessing, time

def task(args):
    count = args[0]
    queue - args[1]
    for i in xrange(count):
        queue.put("%d mississippi" % i)
    return "Done"


def main():
    q = multiprocessing.Queue()
    pool = multiprocessing.Pool()
    result = pool.map_async(task, [(x, q) for x in range(10)])
    time.sleep(1)
    while not q.empty():
        print q.get()
    print result.get()

if __name__ == "__main__":
    main()

I've been able to get this to work using individual Process objects (where I AM alowed to pass a Queue reference) but then I don't have a pool to manage the many processes I want to launch. Any advise on a better pattern for this?

share|improve this question
    
It's not an answer to your question, but try the execnet library <codespeak.net/execnet/>; for multi-process mappings. The built-in multiprocessing has some issues still to be fixed (see the Python tracker). Besides that its source code is quite large and complicated. The execnet library looks much better to me than multiprocessing. –  Andrey Vlasovskikh Jul 10 '10 at 1:26

2 Answers 2

up vote 17 down vote accepted

The following code seems to work:

import multiprocessing, time

def task(args):
    count = args[0]
    queue = args[1]
    for i in xrange(count):
        queue.put("%d mississippi" % i)
    return "Done"


def main():
    manager = multiprocessing.Manager()
    q = manager.Queue()
    pool = multiprocessing.Pool()
    result = pool.map_async(task, [(x, q) for x in range(10)])
    time.sleep(1)
    while not q.empty():
        print q.get()
    print result.get()

if __name__ == "__main__":
    main()

Note that the Queue is got from a manager.Queue() rather than multiprocessing.Queue(). Thanks Alex for pointing me in this direction.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 and Just a quick note that your question helped me in a problem I had today. I'd found the Manager version of the queue, but my code wasn't working because I was relying on a global. It needs to be passed as a parameter, like you are doing. –  winwaed Jan 30 '11 at 22:31

Making q global works...:

import multiprocessing, time

q = multiprocessing.Queue()

def task(count):
    for i in xrange(count):
        q.put("%d mississippi" % i)
    return "Done"

def main():
    pool = multiprocessing.Pool()
    result = pool.map_async(task, range(10))
    time.sleep(1)
    while not q.empty():
        print q.get()
    print result.get()

if __name__ == "__main__":
    main()

If you need multiple queues, e.g. to avoid mixing up the progress of the various pool processes, a global list of queues should work (of course, each process will then need to know what index in the list to use, but that's OK to pass as an argument;-).

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Will this work if the "task" is defined in a different module or package? The example code is very simplified. The real program has an MVC architecture where a producer-consumer pipeline is set up across multiple cores (the model) and it needs to send progress updates to the wxPython GUI (the View). –  David Jul 10 '10 at 5:20
2  
@David, you can try; if your real code doesn't work in this simple way, you'll need to move up a notch in complexity and go for a Manager (which can give you proxies to Queues, etc). –  Alex Martelli Jul 10 '10 at 5:32
    
This doesn't seem to work at all. q never returns anything q.empty() is always True on my machine. Even if I increase the sleep call to 10 seconds which should be excessive time for the task to put a few messages on the queue, q.empty always returns True. –  David Jul 11 '10 at 4:27
    
@David, by "This", do you mean the code I posted in my A? Because that code works fine for me on a dual-core macbook with OSX 10.5, Python 2.6.5 or 2.7. What's your platform? –  Alex Martelli Jul 11 '10 at 6:24
    
Yes, I copied the code you posted and while the results are returned (I get 10 "Done" in a list) nothing is ever returned by the Queue. The debugger shows that q always returns q.empty() == True. Windows 7, ActivePython 2.6.5.12 –  David Jul 12 '10 at 4:27

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