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How would I got about selecting the first parent of a set of elements that contains ALL of those elements?

For example:

<body>
 <dl>
  <dt>Items:</dt>
  <dd>
   <ul>
    <li>Item 1<div class="item-info">...</div></li>
    <li>Item 2<div class="item-info">...</div></li>
    <li>Item 3<div class="item-info">...</div></li>
   </ul>
  </dd>
 </dl>
</body>

I want something like this:

$('.item-info').commonParent();

and it would return the equivalent of:

[$('ul')]

Is there an easy way to do this with jQuery selectors? Or am I gonna have to write a plugin?

share|improve this question
4  
Are you looking for the lowest common ancestor of all of the elements? –  Jamie Wong Jul 9 '10 at 23:33
    
Can the parent contain other classes or are you looking for the parent that only contains the same classes? $(".item-info").parents("ul:first") will give you all (ul) that have those children and automatically filter out duplicates, so you'll only get the one ul in this case. –  Andir Jul 9 '10 at 23:50
    
Yes, I'm looking for a generalized version of lowest-common-ancester –  rossipedia Jul 10 '10 at 18:30
    
Out of curiosity - why do you need to do this? I can't really think of any useful applications. –  Jamie Wong Jul 10 '10 at 21:29
    
Well, the long and short of it, dynamic insertion of a show/hide all button, but grouped by section, and I didn't want to have to change my Javascript if I decided to use different tags for my item lists. –  rossipedia Jul 12 '10 at 16:57

8 Answers 8

up vote 9 down vote accepted

If you are actually looking for lowest common ancestor (See this working in a fiddle):

jQuery.fn.commonAncestor = function() {
  var parents = [];
  var minlen = Infinity;

  $(this).each(function() {
    var curparents = $(this).parents();
    parents.push(curparents);
    minlen = Math.min(minlen, curparents.length);
  });

  for (var i in parents) {
    parents[i] = parents[i].slice(parents[i].length - minlen);
  }

  // Iterate until equality is found
  for (var i = 0; i < parents[0].length; i++) {
    var equal = true;
    for (var j in parents) {
      if (parents[j][i] != parents[0][i]) {
        equal = false;
        break;
      }
    }
    if (equal) return $(parents[0][i]);
  }
  return $([]);
}

Example

<html>
<head>
<script src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.4.2/jquery.min.js"></script>
<script src="jquery.commonancestor.js"></script>


$(function() {
  console.log($(".item-info").commonAncestor());
});
</script>
<body>
 <dl>
  <dt>Items:</dt>
  <dd>
   <ul>
    <li>Item 1<b><div class="item-info">...</div></b></li>
    <li>Item 2<u><div class="item-info">...</div></u></li>
    <li>Item 3<i><div class="item-info">...</div></i></li>
   </ul>
  </dd>
 </dl>
</body>

This has not been tested rigorously, so please point out any errors you see.

EDIT Was returning parent instead of $(parent)

EDIT Wasn't working in IE8

share|improve this answer
    
This seems like it'd do the trick, however I'm wondering what's with all the slicing? Is it because .parents() returns the parent elements in reverse order, ending in html? –  rossipedia Jul 10 '10 at 18:34
    
The slicing is required bring all the nodes to the same height in the DOM tree. If the element closest to the root (html) is 3 nodes away, then the lowest common ancestor cannot be more than 3 nodes away from the root. Also, doing equality checks on anything further away than that is pointless, since an element 3 nodes away from the root cannot possible be equal to an element 4 nodes away. The slice brings down the list of parent nodes to the minimum distance to the root node. –  Jamie Wong Jul 10 '10 at 19:03
    
The initial $(this) isn't needed since in jQuery functions, this is already a jQuery object. Also, since jQuery 1.4 (or thereabouts) an empty jQuery object only requires $() not `$([]) –  ErikE Aug 30 '12 at 21:43
    
See my answer if you are interesting in some comparison information and an edge case that makes your function fail. –  ErikE Aug 31 '12 at 6:13
    
IE8 iterates through array methods when using for(var i in parents). So replace it with for (var i=0; i<parents.length; i++) to only iterate through array items. –  Raúl Ferràs Mar 11 '13 at 11:40

I assume the point is that the .item-info elements are (potentially) spread out throughout the page.

If that's right, try this: http://jsfiddle.net/EJWjf/1/

var $items = $('.item-info');   // Cache all the items in question
var total = $items.length;      // Cache the total number
var parent;                     // Will store the match

$items.first()           // Grab the first item (an arbitrary starting point)
    .parents()           // Get all of its parent elements
    .each(function() {
            // Iterate over each parent, finding the .info-item elements
            //    it contains, and see if the quantity matches the total
        if($(this).find('.item-info').length == total) {
            parent = this;  // If so, we found the closest common ancestor so
            return false;   //     store it and break out of the loop
        }
    });

alert(parent.tagName);

Here's a function version: http://jsfiddle.net/EJWjf/2/

function findCommon(selector) {
    var $items = $(selector);   
    var total = $items.length;      
    var parent;                   

    $items.first()
        .parents()
        .each(function() {
            if($(this).find(selector).length == total) {
                parent = this;
                return false;
            }
        });

    return $(parent);
}

var result = findCommon('.item-info');
share|improve this answer
    
This is a nice simple solution if he's only using one selector. But requires duplication/prior knowledge of the selector(s). –  Jamie Wong Jul 10 '10 at 0:26
    
@Jamie - Please explain what you mean. You would have to know the selector at some point. No reason it couldn't be shared in a variable. Or am I not understanding what you mean? –  user113716 Jul 10 '10 at 0:29
    
@Jamie - Here's a function version: jsfiddle.net/EJWjf/2 Just pass in the selector. Although you're right about multiple selectors. That would require a little more attention. Should be very doable, though. –  user113716 Jul 10 '10 at 0:33
    
Actually, works fine with multiple selectors, if you mean comma separated selectors. jsfiddle.net/EJWjf/4 –  user113716 Jul 10 '10 at 0:40
    
I meant more along the lines of if I have var cont = $("some selector").parents("ul"); then later wanted to do cont.commonAncestor(). Chaining things is a really important part of jQuery. In any case, I was the one that upvoted you, I have no idea who downvoted you since they weren't helpful enough to leave a comment. –  Jamie Wong Jul 10 '10 at 0:45

Here's my version. It performs best of all the jQuery-plugin type answers on the page. It is the only one that handles an empty jQuery object $() without error. It and Jamie Wong's answer are the only ones that handle a single-item jQuery object without error.

I built a jsfiddle showcasing all the versions' output. You can click the Preset buttons to easily see different test cases, or enter your own selector and click Find to see the result.

jQuery.fn.reverse = function() {
   return Array.prototype.reverse.call(this);
};

jQuery.fn.commonAncestor = function() {
   var i, l, current,
      compare = this.eq(0).parents().reverse(),
      pos = compare.length - 1;
   for (i = 1, l = this.length; i < l && pos > 0; i += 1) {
      current = this.eq(i).parents().reverse();
      pos = Math.min(pos, current.length - 1);
      while (compare[pos] !== current[pos]) {
         pos -= 1;
      }
   }
   return compare.eq(pos);
};

In the case where one of the elements is the ancestor of another, all the answers given so far return the parent of the ancestor element. Both the links above include a version of my function where if for example there is a div on the page, $('body, div').commonAncestor() will return body instead of html

Note: this function assumes that all items in the jQuery set are in the current document. It would take special, and strange, effort to get elements from two different documents into the same jQuery object--and in this case my function will fail (and so will all the others on the page). This could be remedied starting with changing the for condition pos > 0 to pos >= 0, making the while loop handle hitting -1, and possibly changing return compare.eq(pos) to return $(compare[pos]) (since the eq() function uses negative indices to index backwards from the end instead of returning empty).

share|improve this answer

Are you looking for any of these?

$("element").parents() // return all parents until reaches 'html'

$("element").parent() // return the first parent

$("element").closest("parent") // return the closest selected parent
share|improve this answer
    
It would be closest("ul") or parents("ul") since there's no "parent" element. That is, unless the OP is actually looking for the closest common element and that's another can of worms. –  Andir Jul 10 '10 at 0:08
1  
I think he's asking for the closest common ancestor, in which case this won't work. –  You Jul 10 '10 at 0:24
    
Yeah, i was thinking $('.item-info').parent() or $('.item-info').closest('ul') when I read the question. –  a7drew Jul 10 '10 at 6:31

I believe this is what you're looking for:

jQuery

The first four lines contain the code that does the actual grabbing of the ULs. The rest is just to display the content of the matched ULs.

<script type="text/javascript">
  $(document).ready(function() {
    // The code that grabs the matching ULs
    var ULsWithAll=$("ul").has(".item-info").filter( function(index) { // Grab all ULs that has at least one .item-info
      var ChildrenOfUL=$(this).children("li");  // Grab the children

      return ChildrenOfUL.length===ChildrenOfUL.has(".item-info").length;  // Are all of them .item-info
    });

    $(ULsWithAll).each(function(){ // Output the ULs that were found
      alert($(this).html());
    })
  });
</script>

HTML

<dl>
  <dt>Items 1:</dt>
  <dd>
    <ul>
      <li>Item 1-1<div class="item-info">...</div></li>
      <li>Item 1-2<div class="item-info">...</div></li>
      <li>Item 1-3<div class="item-info">...</div></li>
    </ul>
  </dd>
  <dt>Items 2:</dt>
  <dd>
    <ul>
      <li>Item 2-1<div class="item-info">...</div></li>
      <li>Item 2-2<div class="item-info">...</div></li>
      <li>Item 2-3<div class="item-info">...</div></li>
    </ul>
  </dd>
  <dt>Items 3:</dt>
  <dd>
    <ul>
      <li>Item 3-1<div class="item-info">...</div></li>
      <li>Item 3-2<div class="item-info">...</div></li>
      <li>Item 3-3<div>...</div></li>
    </ul>
  </dd>
</dl>

The above jQuery code will return the ULs for the first and second hit (the third one is a dud). Check it at http://jsfiddle.net/ksTtF/

Another example (without the alert): http://jsfiddle.net/vQxGC/

share|improve this answer
    
This is basically like patrick's answer, except longer, harder to understand and with more content duplication - i.e. making it useless if you wanted to reuse it. –  Jamie Wong Jul 10 '10 at 0:47
    
@Jamie Wong - The code that actually does something is five lines. Sure, you can make one less jQuery element grab by putting $(this).children("li") in a variable. –  Gert Grenander Jul 10 '10 at 0:58
    
Okay, my issue with the length is invalid, but the other issues stand. –  Jamie Wong Jul 10 '10 at 1:04
    
Changed it to filtering instead. Even more efficient. –  Gert Grenander Jul 10 '10 at 1:26
    
I didn't include your function in the test cases because it does not lend itself to being a jQuery plugin. –  ErikE Aug 31 '12 at 6:08

Have you forgotten? ... It's just Javascript ...

$('.item-info').get(0).parentElement
share|improve this answer
    
I know it's just javascript. However, the problem I was running into isn't as simple as that. I might have a single list item, an input box, a span and a link as my jQuery set, and I would want to get the first parent object that contains all of them, regardless of where they are in the document. –  rossipedia Feb 15 '12 at 4:16

so... I know this is an old thread, but I needed this exact functionality, and needed it to work in the beautiful chain that is jQuery;) so here's what I came up with:

jQuery.fn.firstParent=function (f){
    //Set the variables for use;
    s=$(this);
    var i,j;
    var p=[];
    var pv=true;

    //make sure there is something to itterate over
    if(s.length>0){

        //build a multidimentional array of parents
        s.each(function(){p.push($(this).parents());});

        //itterate through the parents of the first element starting at the closest
        for(i=0;i<p[0].length;i++){

            //itterate through all elements after the first
            for(j=1;j<s.length;j++){

                //look for the current parent of the first element in each array
                pv=($.inArray(p[0][i],p[j]) != -1);

                //if we are looking at the last element and it matchs, return that parent
                if(pv==true && j==s.length-1) return typeof(f)=='string'?$(p[0][i]).find(f):$(p[0][i]);
            }
        }
    }
    return false;
}

there is also a jsfiddle here

share|improve this answer
    
Really elegant, I like it :) –  rossipedia Apr 12 '12 at 0:12
    
Trey, this function fails in some cases. See this fiddle for some test cases (click the Presets). See my answer for more detail. –  ErikE Aug 31 '12 at 6:14

Inspired from a mix of the other answers on the quiestion, I've created a version that I found fitted my requirements. http://jsfiddle.net/qDRv5/ (Note that it writes the found parent to the console)

jQuery.fn.firstParent=function (f){
    //Set the variables for use;
    s=$(this);
    var i,j;
    var p=[];
    var pv=true;

    //make sure there is something to itterate over
    if(s.length>0){

        //build a multidimentional array of parents
        s.each(function(){p.push($(this).parents());});

        //itterate through the parents of the first element starting at the closest
        for(i=0;i<p[0].length;i++){

            //itterate through all elements after the first
            for(j=1;j<s.length;j++){

                //look for the current parent of the first element in each array
                pv=($.inArray(p[0][i],p[j]) != -1);

                //if we are looking at the last element and it matchs, return that parent
                if(pv==true && j==s.length-1) return typeof(f)=='string'?$(p[0][i]).find(f):$(p[0][i]);
            }
        }
    }
    return false;
}

I start by looking for the element the least steps way from root, because I know for sure that this element will not have a common ancestor further away from root. I then step back from parent at a time, from that elements an checks if that parent elements has all the other elements as children. When I find a parent elements that has all the elements as children, my mission i complete.

share|improve this answer
    
Ricki, this function fails in some cases. See this fiddle for some test cases (click the Presets). See my answer for more detail. –  ErikE Aug 31 '12 at 6:14

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