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Would it be faster to just put code inside a try-catch block instead of performing various error checks?

For example..

function getProjectTask(projectTaskId) {
    if (YAHOO.lang.isUndefined(projectTaskId) || YAHOO.lang.isNull(projectTaskId) && !YAHOO.lang.isNumber(projectTaskId)) {
        return null;
    }

    var projectPhaseId, projectPhaseIndex, projectTaskIndex, projectPhases, projectPhase, projectTask;

    if (!YAHOO.lang.hasOwnProperty(projectTaskPhaseMap, projectTaskId)) {
        return null;
    }

    projectPhaseId = projectTaskPhaseMap[projectTaskId];

    if (YAHOO.lang.isUndefined(projectPhaseId) || YAHOO.lang.isNull(projectPhaseId) || !YAHOO.lang.hasOwnProperty(scheduleData.ProjectPhasesMap, projectPhaseId)) {
        return null;
    }

    projectPhaseIndex = scheduleData.ProjectPhasesMap[projectPhaseId];
    if (YAHOO.lang.isUndefined(projectPhaseIndex) || YAHOO.lang.isNull(projectPhaseIndex) || !YAHOO.lang.hasOwnProperty(scheduleData.ProjectPhases[projectPhaseIndex])) {
        return null;
    }
    projectPhase = scheduleData.ProjectPhases[projectPhaseIndex];

    if (!YAHOO.lang.hasOwnProperty(projectPhase.ProjectTasksMap, projectTaskId)) {
        return null;
    }

    projectTaskIndex = projectPhase.ProjectTasksMap[projectTaskId];

    if (YAHOO.lang.isUndefined(projectTaskIndex) || YAHOO.lang.isNull(projectTaskIndex)) {
        return null;
    }

    projectTask = scheduleData.ProjectTasks[projectTaskIndex];
}

VS

function getProjectTask(projectTaskId) {
    try {
        projectPhaseId = projectTaskPhaseMap[projectTaskId];
        projectPhaseIndex = scheduleData.ProjectPhasesMap[projectPhaseId];
        projectPhase = scheduleData.ProjectPhases[projectPhaseIndex];
        projectTaskIndex = projectPhase.ProjectTasksMap[projectTaskId];
        projectTask = scheduleData.ProjectTasks[projectTaskIndex];

    }
    catch (e) {
        return null;
    }
}

I hope my question makes sense. I would be happy to clarify. Thank you!

share|improve this question
    
even function isNull(c) is useless, see my answer... :) –  galambalazs Jul 10 '10 at 0:48
3  
I'm not familiar with YUI, I just hate code that makes me scroll sideways! –  Josh Stodola Jul 10 '10 at 0:49
    
I'm not familiar with YUI either, but checking for null || undefined can be done easily with javascript –  galambalazs Jul 10 '10 at 1:50
    
Sorry, I reformatted the code section to have less scrolling. You guys are right. I tried to make use of the YUI library code when a simple built-in javascript statement would suffice. =P –  Abe Jul 10 '10 at 23:42

5 Answers 5

up vote 28 down vote accepted

"Programs must be written for people to read, and only incidentally for machines to execute."

Abelson & Sussman, SICP, preface to the first edition

Always aim to readable code. The key thing to remember is:

Avoid try-catch in performance-critical functions, and loops

Anywhere else they won't do much harm. Use them wisely, use them sparingly. As a side note if you want to support older browsers they may not have try-catch.

But as I see you clearly misuse some functions for error checking. You can test for the desired objects and properties of objects right before you use them instead of complex checking. And:

if (YAHOO.lang.isUndefined(projectPhaseId) || YAHOO.lang.isNull(projectPhaseId))

can be written as

if (projectPhaseId != null)

for example... So the example above can be fairly readable even without try catches. You seem to misuse YUI a bit.

I would bet this works as expected:

function getProjectTask(projectTaskId) {

   var projectPhaseId    = projectTaskPhaseMap[projectTaskId],
       projectPhaseIndex = scheduleData.ProjectPhasesMap[projectPhaseId],
       projectPhase      = scheduleData.ProjectPhases[projectPhaseIndex];

  if (projectPhase == null) return null; // projectPhase would break the chain

  var projectTaskIndex  = projectPhase.ProjectTasksMap[projectTaskId],
      projectTask       = scheduleData.ProjectTasks[projectTaskIndex];

   return projectTask || null; // end of the dependency chain

}

How cool is that? :)

share|improve this answer
7  
Well put. I'd just like to add that unless you actually have a performance problem, it's best to make your code readable. When you actually do have a performance problem, first measure where the problem is, only then optimize. Otherwise you may spend much time optimizing the wrong things. –  Jani Hartikainen Jul 10 '10 at 0:36
4  
+1 for "Programs must be written for people to read, and only incidentally for machines to execute." –  Marco Demaio May 7 '11 at 15:09
    
This is an excellent answer. There are times and cases for using try-catch, despite the open source community's continual battle cry against exception handling code. It doesn't matter how fast your code is, if nobody can read, understand or maintain it except you. –  whoblitz Aug 13 '13 at 3:02
    
I'd say performance-wise you can go crazy with try/catch. Don't know what the situation was back in '13 but right now jsperf shows almost no performance hit on firefox and chrome(won't bother and actively refuse to test in IE). I borrowed this test and added my own snippet to test performance without any type of error catching: jsperf.com/native-try-catch-vs-custom-trycatch-loop/6 –  Pichan Feb 24 at 3:49

Why not have a fact basis for the argument? The following code demonstrates the performance impact:

var Speedy = function() {
    this.init();
};
Speedy.prototype = {
    init: function() {
        var i, t1;
        this.sumWith = 0;
        this.sumWithout = 0;
        this.countWith = 0;
        this.countWithout = 0;
        for (i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
            t1 = this.getTime();
            console.log("Using Try/Catch, Trial #" + (i + 1) );
                        console.log("started " + t1 );
            this.goTry(t1);
            this.countWith++;
        }
        for (i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
            t1 = this.getTime();
            console.log("W/out Try/Catch, Trial #" + (i + 1) );
            console.log("started  :" + t1 );
            this.goAlone(t1);
            this.countWithout++;
        }
        for (i = 5; i < 10; i++) {
            t1 = this.getTime();
            console.log("Using Try/Catch, Trial #" + (i + 1) );
            console.log("started  :" + t1);
            this.goTry(t1);
            this.countWith++;
        }
        for (i = 5; i < 10; i++) {
            t1 = this.getTime();
            console.log("W/out Try/Catch, Trial #" + (i + 1) );
            console.log("started  :" + t1);
            this.goAlone(t1);
            this.countWithout++;
        }
        console.log("---------------------------------------");
        console.log("Average time (ms) USING Try/Catch: " + this.sumWith / this.countWith + " ms");
        console.log("Average time (ms) W/OUT Try/Catch: " + this.sumWithout / this.countWithout + " ms");
        console.log("---------------------------------------");
    },

    getTime: function() {
        return new Date();
    },

    done: function(t1, wasTry) {
        var t2 = this.getTime();
        var td = t2 - t1;
        console.log("ended.....: " + t2);
        console.log("diff......: " + td);
        if (wasTry) {
            this.sumWith += td;
        }
        else {
            this.sumWithout += td;
        }
    },

    goTry: function(t1) {
        try {
            var counter = 0;
            for (var i = 0; i < 999999; i++) {
                counter++;
            }
            this.done(t1, true);
        }
        catch (err) {
            console.error(err);
        }
    },

    goAlone: function(t1) {
        var counter = 0;
        for (var i = 0; i < 999999; i++) {
            counter++;
        }
        this.done(t1, false);
    }
};

var s = new Speedy();

This JSFiddle will show you the output in firebug lite's console: http://jsfiddle.net/Mct5N/

share|improve this answer
1  
hey wow you actually answered the question! :) –  Robert Levy Feb 3 '12 at 16:25
2  
The implementation above no longer works (jsFiddle doesn't like document.writeln ). Here's an updated version: jsfiddle.net/Mct5N –  blong Apr 16 '13 at 19:32

Sure, it makes for more compact code, but it reduces your debug ability and makes adding graceful error-recovery, or useful error messages much, much, harder.

share|improve this answer

Depends on the situation. As galambalazs mentions readability is important. Consider:

function getCustomer (id) {
  if (typeof data!='undefined' && data.stores && data.stores.customers 
      && typeof data.stores.customers.getById=='function') {
    return data.stores.customers.getById(id);
  } else {
    return null;
  }
}

compared to:

function getCustomer (id) {
  try {return data.stores.customers.getById(id);} catch (e) { return null; }
}

I'd say the second is much more readable. You tend to get data back like this from things like google's apis or twitter's feeds (usually not with deeply nested methods though, that's just here for demonstration).

Of course, performance is also important, but these days javascript engines are fast enough that nobody's likely to notice a difference, unless you're going to call getCustomer every ten milliseconds or something.

share|improve this answer

Keep in mind that this varies based on browsers as well but overall I have not read anything about significant performance penalties for using a try/catch block. But it's not exactly a good practice to get into using them because you are not able to tell why a problem failed.

Here is an interesting slide show of some javascript performance considerations. On slide 76 they cover try/catch blocks and the performance impact. http://www.slideshare.net/madrobby/extreme-javascript-performance

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