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Source

def flags(*opts):
    keys = [t[0] for t in opts]
    words = [t[1] for t in opts]
    nums = [2**i for i in range(len(opts))]
    attrs = dict(zip(keys,nums))
    choices = iter(zip(nums,words))
    return type('Flags', (), dict(attrs))

Abilities = flags(
    ('FLY', 'Can fly'),
    ('FIREBALL', 'Can shoot fireballs'),
    ('INVISIBLE', 'Can turn invisible'),
)

Question

How can I add an __iter__ method to Abilities so that I can iterate over choices?

Why?

This way I can use things like

hero.abilities = Abilities.FLY | Abilities.FIREBALL

if hero.abilities & Abilities.FIREBALL:

for k, v in Abilities:
    print k, v

in my code without having to use any magic numbers or strings, and I can also save the set of flags to the DB as a single int, or display the list in a readable format.

Other improvements are welcome.

share|improve this question
    
Note that you're not avoiding magic numbers, but rather creating them: the values of the constants are created magically instead of being clearly specified. This means that you probably don't want to save these values to a database, since they'll be invalidated any time they're renumbered due to edits, whereas explicitly-specified bitmasks won't change unexpectedly. –  Glenn Maynard Jul 10 '10 at 4:21
    
Are they teaching kids that 'metaprogramming is a silver bullet' these days? This is an honest question as it reminds me of an era when new grads didn't feel they were doing their job if they couldn't force some multiple inheritance into their design. –  msw Jul 10 '10 at 4:43
    
@Glenn, what you call the "magical" assignment of numbers is, of course, no worse than a good old C enum (which "magically" assigns 0, 1, 2, etc, without they being "clearly specified") -- which has been in frequent use for nearly 40 years and not caused (yet) the rivers to turn into blood (last I checked, at least). –  Alex Martelli Jul 10 '10 at 4:49
    
@msw, if by "metaprogramming" you mean the tame assignment of successive powers of two to given names, then, "these days" must clearly go back to the '70s, since C's enum similarly assign successive integers, as I remarked to Glenn. "It's silly to write down 1, 2, 3, 4,... or 1, 2, 4, 8, ... yourself when the computer can do it better" ((the latter typically via left shits of 1 in C;-)) has indeed been taught for at least the last 40 years or so (multiple inheritance, OTOH, is hardly taught any longer, since too many colleges have moved to Java;-). –  Alex Martelli Jul 10 '10 at 4:53
    
@alex: no, I was referring to consing up a type via non-obvious return type(...) instead of using the less magical means in my (admittedly incomplete) pseudo-code below. As you know I'm a Python tyro; it is well possible that I'm misusing the term or concepts, but if I am not, I'm all for reading less magic. (I think we may be referring to two different aspects of the question, if so, sorry). –  msw Jul 10 '10 at 5:08

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There's no need to use a dynamic type here; I'd restructure this as a simple class, for example:

class flags(object):
    def __init__(self, *opts):
        keys = [t[0] for t in opts]
        words = [t[1] for t in opts]
        nums = [2**i for i in range(len(opts))]
        self.attrs = dict(zip(keys,nums))
        self.choices = zip(nums,words)

    def __getattr__(self, a):
        return self.attrs[a]

    def __iter__(self):
        return iter(self.choices)

Abilities = flags(
    ('FLY', 'Can fly'),
    ('FIREBALL', 'Can shoot fireballs'),
    ('INVISIBLE', 'Can turn invisible'),
)

print Abilities.FLY
for k, v in Abilities:
    print k, v
share|improve this answer
1  
As an aside, if you really want to define member functions for a dynamic type, the cleanest way is to declare them in a base class, and specify it in the bases tuple to type(). –  Glenn Maynard Jul 10 '10 at 4:38
    
A clean solution that solves the problem. –  Mark Jul 11 '10 at 6:28

Why are you doing it the hard way? If you want a dict with __getattr__ overriding why not start with one:

class Flags(dict):
    def __init__(self, *args):
        dict.__init__(self, args)
    def __getattr__(self, name):
         return self[name]
...

This also has the Advantage of Least Surprise, since dict.__iter__() generates keys and dict.iteritems() yields tuples.

share|improve this answer

You need two key changes -- the last lines of flags should be:

choices = iter(zip(nums,words))
attrs['__iter__'] = lambda self: choices
return type('Flags', (), dict(attrs))()

Note that I've added a line setting __iter__, and a trailing () in the return to instantiate the type (to loop on a type you'd have to use a custom metaclass -- way overkill, no need).

The last line of flags should actually be:

return type('Flags', (), attrs)()

as there's no reason to make a copy of attrs, which is already a dict (but that's an innocuous redundancy, not a killer mistake;-).

share|improve this answer
3  
@Alex: doing it that way wouldn't mean that the terator would work only once? Instead of having a "choices" var, I think the correct thing would be to do: attrs['iter'] = lambda self: iter(zip(nums,words)) –  jsbueno Jul 10 '10 at 4:27
3  
You can always count on SO to get people excited about doing things the wrong way. –  Glenn Maynard Jul 10 '10 at 4:43
2  
There's no difference between returning that completely useless class instance or returning the iterator itself. And even if there was, you shouldn't return a class instance, you should make the whole thing be a class and use __init__, and even if you didn't return an instance you should use the class syntax, and not that deranged type(name, supers, d) syntax which serves no purpose except to make your code ugly! Then you overcomplicate by mentioning metaclasses, and admit that the dict() call was devoid of purpose. And your answer got accepted? Edit: Ah, well, not anymore I guess. –  Devin Jeanpierre Jul 10 '10 at 5:37
1  
@Alex, you are aware that you don't have to answer the question exactly as asked, yes? I'm not sure why you're getting butthurt over that he realized that turning flags into a class instead of a function is more sensible. –  habnabit Jul 10 '10 at 5:48
2  
This is a dispute, not an attack. I think you are and were wrong, that's all. Even the insult I removed was not against you, but your code. I don't want to teach you; as you said, I wasn't there. I actually took care to use an argument of reasoning, because logic is all I have. Regardless, I do know that using it the way you and Mark did is ugly and less maintainable. As Code Complete says, "Program into the language". With lambda, I believe GvR has stated some regret about that, no?: bit.ly/LvPE0 . And please don't browbeat me with credentials, I am not attacking your qualifications. –  Devin Jeanpierre Jul 10 '10 at 6:26

It would be a more Pythonic solution if you implement your own __getattr__ method for accessing dynamic fields instead of dealing with metaclasses through type.

Edit: It's not clear to me what do you mean by choices, but here is an example:

class Abilities(object):
    def __init__(self, abilities):
        self.abilities = abilities

    def __getattr__(self, name):
        a = [x for x in self.abilities if x[0] == name]
        if len(a) != 1:
            raise AttributeError('attribute {0} not found'.format(name))
        title, id, help = a[0]
        return id

    def __iter__(self):
        return (id, help for title, id, help in self.abilities)

SPEC = [
    ('FLY', 10, 'Can fly'),
    ('FIREBALL', 13, 'Can shoot fireballs'),
    ('INVISIBLE', 14, 'Can turn invisible'),
]

abitilies = Abilities(SPEC)

hero.abilities = abilities.FLY | abilities.FIREBALL
for k, v in abilities:
    print k, v
share|improve this answer
    
Can you do that and keep the same declarative syntax for Abilities? –  Mark Jul 10 '10 at 4:07
    
@Mark Just added an example. –  Andrey Vlasovskikh Jul 10 '10 at 4:18
    
@Andrey: I fail to see how that acomplishes the request of being able to iterate over the given attributes. –  jsbueno Jul 10 '10 at 4:28
    
I think you've slightly misinterpreted my intentions. It's supposed to produce a re-usable class so that I can easily create many such flag-sets. "choices" is supposed to be a list of (int, human readable string) pairs, but its not actually supposed to be an attribute or method; the iterator is what lets me loop over it. Thanks though :) –  Mark Jul 10 '10 at 4:29
    
OK, I'm not giving up :) Here is another corrected version. –  Andrey Vlasovskikh Jul 10 '10 at 4:37

Based on your guys' suggestions, I came up with this:

Source

class enumerable(object):
    def __init__(self, func, *opts):
        keys = func(len(opts))
        self.attrs = dict(zip([t[0] for t in opts], keys))
        self.opts = zip(keys, [t[1] for t in opts])
    def __getattr__(self, a):
        return self.attrs[a] 
    def __len__(self):
        return len(self.opts)
    def __iter__(self):
        return iter(self.opts)
    def __deepcopy__(self, memo):
        return self

class enum(enumerable):
    def __init__(self, *opts):
        return super(enum, self).__init__(range, *opts)

class flags(enumerable):
    def __init__(self, *opts):
        return super(flags, self).__init__(lambda l: [1<<i for i in range(l)], *opts)

### tests:

Abilities = enum(
    ('FLY', 'Can fly'),
    ('FIREBALL', 'Can shoot fireballs'),
    ('INVISIBLE', 'Can turn invisible'),
    ('FROST_NOVA', 'Can call down an ice storm'),
    ('BLINK', 'Can teleport short distances'),
)

print 'Fireball = %d' % Abilities.FIREBALL
print 'Number of options = %d' % len(Abilities) 
for k, v in Abilities:
    print '%d: %s' % (k, v)

Output

Fireball = 1
Number of options = 5
0: Can fly
1: Can shoot fireballs
2: Can turn invisible
3: Can call down an ice storm
4: Can teleport short distances

For whatever reason, my particular application needs __deepcopy__ to be implemented. Since these classes are for building "constants", none of their attributes should ever be changed after creation; thus I hope it's safe just to return self.

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