Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Can someone help me understand why this gives an output of 0?

#include <iostream>                        
using namespace std;                       

int main() {                               
    float celsius;                         
    float fahrenheit;

    cout << "Enter Celsius temperature: "; 
    cin >> celsius;
    fahrenheit = (5/9) * (celsius + 32);
    cout << "Fahrenheit = " << fahrenheit << endl;

    return 0;                             
}
share|improve this question
2  
Yes, I just noticed the incorrect formula as well. The program has bigger problems than just printing 0. –  TNi Jul 10 '10 at 4:48
1  
Your code sample seems to indicate that you want to convert Celsius degrees to Fahrenheit degrees. What do you want to convert? –  Alerty Jul 10 '10 at 18:24

7 Answers 7

up vote 18 down vote accepted

(5/9) will by default be computed as an integer division and will be zero. Try (5.0/9)

share|improve this answer
6  
Or (celsius + 32) * 5 / 9. –  Gabe Jul 10 '10 at 4:40
6  
@Gabe: Incorrect Formula :P –  Prasoon Saurav Jul 10 '10 at 4:59

Fahrenheit to celsius would be (Fahrenheit - 32) * 5 / 9

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Correct formula. Don't quite understand all the downvotes. –  TNi Jul 10 '10 at 4:50
    
Despite the title, the program clearly is written to convert Celsius to Fahrenheit (even though it gets the formula wrong) –  Larry Wang Jul 10 '10 at 5:13
    
Also your code won't work. Try it out. (Hint: what's the outcome of anything /9 going to be in C++?) –  JUST MY correct OPINION Jul 10 '10 at 6:20
    
@JUST MY correct OPINION Did you try to compile and see the result? Notice that I didn't use the brackets around constants. –  cpx Jul 10 '10 at 9:09

In C++, 5/9 computes the result as an integer as both the operands are integers. You need to give an hint to the compiler that you want the result as a float/double. You can do it by explictly casting one of the operands like ((double)5)/9;

EDIT Since it is tagged C++, you can do the casting bit more elegantly using the static_cast. For example: static_cast<double>(5)/9. Although in this particular case you can directly use 5.0/9 to get the desired result, the casting will be helpful when you have variables instead of constant values such as 5.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't see why this got downvoted. It is a correct answer, though it might be a SCITE candidate. –  Billy ONeal Jul 10 '10 at 4:46
1  
Oh don't use an ugly cast. Type a float literal directly like jdv suggests. –  Jon-Eric Jul 10 '10 at 4:50
3  
@Naveen: Because it is a C++ tagged question, I would not recommend C-style casts. Instead I would be recommending static_cast. –  Prasoon Saurav Jul 10 '10 at 4:52
2  
Why would it be more elegant to cast an int literal to a double? You can use a floating point literal or double literal and it will work fine... –  Alerty Jul 10 '10 at 18:08
1  
@Ben Voigt: Experienced programmer?? This is some really basic C++ knowledge! Using comments would be better to inform what the formula does. –  Alerty Jul 10 '10 at 18:15

In your code sample you are trying to divide an integer with another integer. This is the cause of all your trouble. Here is an article that might find interesting on that subject.

With the notion of integer division you can see right away that this is not what you want in your formula. Instead, you need to use some floating point literals.

I am a rather confused by the title of this thread and your code sample. Do you want to convert Celsius degrees to Fahrenheit or do the opposite?

I will base my code sample on your own code sample until you give more details on what you want.

Here is an example of what you can do :

#include <iostream>
//no need to use the whole std namespace... use what you need :)                        
using std::cout;
using std::cin;
using std::endl;                      

int main() 
{   
    //Variables                           
    float celsius,    //represents the temperature in Celsius degrees
          fahrenheit; //represents the converted temperature in Fahrenheit degrees

    //Ask for the temperature in Celsius degrees
    cout << "Enter Celsius temperature: "; 
    cin >> celsius;

    //Formula to convert degrees in Celsius to Fahrenheit degrees
    //Important note: floating point literals need to have the '.0'!
    fahrenheit = celsius * 9.0/5.0 + 32.0;

    //Print the converted temperature to the console
    cout << "Fahrenheit = " << fahrenheit << endl;                            
}
share|improve this answer

Best way would be

#include <iostream>                        
using namespace std;                       

int main() {                               
    float celsius;                         
    float fahrenheit;

    cout << "Enter Celsius temperature: "; 
    cin >> celsius;
    fahrenheit = (celsius * 1.8) + 32;// removing division for the confusion
    cout << "Fahrenheit = " << fahrenheit << endl;

    return 0;                             
}

:)

share|improve this answer

Mine worked perfectly!

/* Two common temperature scales are Fahrenheit and Celsius.
** The boiling point of water is 212° F, and 100° C.
** The freezing point of water is 32° F, and 0° C.
** Assuming that the relationship bewtween these two
** temperature scales is: F = 9/5C+32,
** Celsius = (f-32) * 5/9.
***********************/

#include <iostream> // cin, cout

using namespace std; // System definition of cin and cout commands,
                     // if not, programmer would have to write every
                     // single line as: std::cout or std::cin

int main () // Main function

{

    /* Declare variables */
    double c, f;

    cout << "\nProgram that changes temperature from Celsius to Fahrenheit.\n";
    cout << "Please enter a temperature in Celsius: ";

    cin >> c;
    f = c * 9 / 5 + 32;
    cout << "\nA temperature of " << c << "° Celsius, is equivalent to "
         << f << "° Fahrenheit.\n";
    return 0;

}
share|improve this answer

The answer has already been found although I would also like to share my answer:

int main(void)
{
using namespace std;

short tempC;
cout << "Please enter a Celsius value: ";
cin >> tempC;
double tempF = convert(tempC);
cout << tempC << " degrees Celsius is " << tempF << " degrees Fahrenheit." << endl;
cin.get();
cin.get();
return 0;

}

int convert(short nT)
{
return nT * 1.8 + 32;
}

This is a more proper way to do this; however, it is slightly more complex then what you were going for.

share|improve this answer

protected by Ben Jackson Aug 9 '13 at 23:56

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality answers, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site.

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.