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How do I rename a file using C#?

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9 Answers

up vote 210 down vote accepted

Take a look at System.IO.File.Move, "move" the file to a new name.

System.IO.File.Move("oldfilename", "newfilename");
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This solution does not work when file names differ only in letter case. For example file.txt and File.txt –  SepehrM Jul 6 at 20:31
    
@SepehrM, I just double checked and it works fine on my Windows 8.1 machine. –  Chris Taylor Jul 7 at 1:57
    
I'm not sure why this happens but take a look at these posts: stackoverflow.com/questions/8152731/… and codeproject.com/Tips/365773/… –  SepehrM Jul 7 at 6:43
    
@SepehrM, I did not test it, but the samples you point to use FileInfo.Move and not File.Move so maybe that has something to do with it? –  Chris Taylor Jul 7 at 12:31
    
Thanks for getting back. Unfortunately I tested with File.Move and still have the same issue! –  SepehrM Jul 7 at 13:48
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System.IO.File.Move(oldNameFullPath, newNameFullPath);
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You can use File.Move to do it.

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In File.Move method, this wont overwrite the file if it is already exists. And it will throw exception.

So we need to check whether the file exists or not.

/* Delete the file if exists, else no exception thrown. */

File.Delete(newFileName); // Delete the existing file if exists
File.Move(oldFileName,newFileName); // Rename the oldFileName into newFileName

or surround with try catch to avoid exception.

Hope this helps.

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just add

namespace System.IO
{
    public static class ExtendedMethod
    {
        public static void Rename(this FileInfo fileInfo, string newName)
        {
           fileInfo.MoveTo(fileInfo.Directory.FullName + "\\" + newName);
        }
    }
}

and then...

FileInfo file = new FileInfo("c:\test.txt");
file.Rename("test2.txt");
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1) First solution

Avoid System.IO.File.Move solutions posted here. (marked answer included) It fails over networks. However copy/delete pattern works locally and over networks. Follow one of the move solutions but replace it with Copy instead. Then use File.Delete to delete the original file.

You can create a Rename method to simplify it.

2) Ease of use

Use the VB assembly in C# Add reference to Microsoft.VisualBasic

then to rename a file

Microsoft.VisualBasic.FileIO.FileSystem.RenameFile(myfile, newName);

Both are strings, note that myfile has the full path. newName does not. for example

a="C:\whatever\a.txt";
b="b.txt";
Microsoft.VisualBasic.FileIO.FileSystem.RenameFile(a, b);

C:\whatever\ folder will now contain b.txt

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just so you know, Microsoft.VisualBasic.FileIO.FileSystem.RenameFile calls File.Move. Other thank normalizing the original file and doing some additional error checks on the arguments ie. file exists, file name not null etc. it then calls File.Move. –  Chris Taylor Jul 7 at 2:07
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NOTE: In this example code we open a directory and search for PDF files with open and closed parenthesis in the name of the file. You can check and replace any character in the name you like or just specify a whole new name using replace functions. There are other ways to work from this code to do more elaborate renames but my main intention was to show how to use File.Move to do a batch rename. This worked against 335 pdf files in 180 directories when I ran it on my laptop. This is spur of the moment code and there are more elaborate ways to do it.

 using System;
 using System.Collections.Generic;
 using System.IO;
 using System.Linq;
 using System.Text;
 using System.Threading.Tasks;

 namespace BatchRenamer
  {
    class Program
     {
        static void Main(string[] args)
     {
        var dirnames = Directory.GetDirectories(@"C:\the full directory path of files to rename goes here");

        int i = 0;

        try
        {
            foreach (var dir in dirnames)
            {
                var fnames = Directory.GetFiles(dir, "*.pdf").Select(Path.GetFileName);

                DirectoryInfo d = new DirectoryInfo(dir);
                FileInfo[] finfo = d.GetFiles("*.pdf");

                foreach (var f in fnames)
                {

                    i++;
                    Console.WriteLine("The number of the file being renamed is: {0}", i);

                    if (!File.Exists(Path.Combine(dir, f.ToString().Replace("(", "").Replace(")", ""))))
                    {
                        File.Move(Path.Combine(dir, f), Path.Combine(dir, f.ToString().Replace("(", "").Replace(")", "")));


                    }

                    else
                    {
                        Console.WriteLine("The file you are attempting to rename already exists! The file path is {0}.", dir);
                        foreach (FileInfo fi in finfo)
                        {
                            Console.WriteLine("The file modify date is: {0} ", File.GetLastWriteTime(dir));
                        }

                    }

                }

            }
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {

            Console.WriteLine(ex.Message);
        }
        Console.Read();
    }
}

}

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2  
That's... completely beside the point, on a question answered exactly to the point 3 years ago. –  Nyerguds Nov 19 '13 at 11:33
1  
It's a valid example. Overkill maybe but not beside the point. +1 –  Adam Nov 27 '13 at 9:11
    
@Adam: it's a very specific implementation of exactly the answer that was already given three years before, on a question that wasn't about any specific implementation in the first place. Don't see how that's in any way constructive. –  Nyerguds Dec 5 '13 at 10:52
    
@Nyerguds then we have different definitions of 'beside the point', which is not surprising since it's a subjective term. –  Adam Dec 6 '13 at 11:20
    
@Nyerguds if it's irrelevant for you then that is fine. Some people like verbosity because it helps them to find "real world" implementations of "sample/example" code. It renames file(s). How it is beside the point is pretty much as Adam said, it's subjective. For some reason you feel it to be absolutely objective. Oh well, to each his own. Thanks for the input, either way. –  MicRoc Feb 12 at 5:27
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Using System.IO;

  string oldFilePath = @"C:\OldFile.txt"; // Full path of old file
  string newFilePath = @"C:\NewFile.txt"; // Full path of new file

  if (File.Exists(newFilePath))
    {
         File.Delete(newFilePath);
    }
  File.Move(oldFilePath,newFilePath);
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If you're going to do this, I'd suggest checking that the 'oldFilePath' exists before doing anything... or else you'll delete the 'newFilePath' for no reason. –  John Kroetch 2 days ago
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When C# has no some feature I use C++ or C.

public partial class Program
{
    [DllImport("msvcrt", CallingConvention = CallingConvention.Cdecl, SetLastError = true)]
    public static extern int rename(
            [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPStr)]
            string oldpath,
            [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.LPStr)]
            string newpath);

    static void FileRename()
    {
        while (true)
        {
            Console.Clear();
            Console.Write("Enter a folder name: ");
            string dir = Console.ReadLine().Trim('\\') + "\\";
            if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(dir))
                break;
            if (!Directory.Exists(dir))
            {
                Console.WriteLine("{0} does not exist", dir);
                continue;
            }
            string[] files = Directory.GetFiles(dir, "*.mp3");

            for (int i = 0; i < files.Length; i++)
            {
                string oldName = Path.GetFileName(files[i]);
                int pos = oldName.IndexOfAny(new char[] { '0', '1', '2' });
                if (pos == 0)
                    continue;

                string newName = oldName.Substring(pos);
                int res = rename(files[i], dir + newName);
            }
        }
        Console.WriteLine("\n\t\tPress any key to go to main menu\n");
        Console.ReadKey(true);
    }
}
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11  
C# absolutely has the ability to rename files. –  Andrew Barber Oct 26 '12 at 4:53
43  
I am speechless –  Chris McGrath May 10 '13 at 19:17
1  
aaaaaaaaand this is why I don't miss C++ at all. –  nathanchere Oct 3 '13 at 6:56
    
I like your solution. –  Mitulát báti Feb 13 at 14:55
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