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Say, I have a file that has the following lines with a "TIMESTAMP" "NAME":

10:00:00 Bob
11:00:00 Tom
11:00:20 Fred
11:00:40 George
12:00:00 Bill

I want to read this file, group the names that occur in each hour on a single line, then write the revised lines to a file, for example.

10:00:00 Bob
11:00:00 Tom, Fred, George
12:00:00 Bill

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2  
(1) Are lines from the same hour always contiguous? (2) Is the file small enough to fit in memory? –  FMc Jul 10 '10 at 11:38
    
(1) Yes. (2) No. –  Alan Thomas Jul 11 '10 at 2:54

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Given that, per comments on the original question, all entries for the same hour are contiguous and the file is too large to fit into memory, I would dispense with the hash entirely - if the raw file is too big to fit in memory, then a hash containing all of its data will likely also be too large. (Yes, it's compressing the data a bit, but the hash itself adds substantial overhead.)

My solution, then:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my $current_hour = -1;
my @names;

while (my $line = <DATA>) {
  my ($hour, $name) = $line =~ /(\d{2}):\d{2}:\d{2} (.*)/;
  next unless $hour;

  if ($hour != $current_hour) {
    print_hour($current_hour, @names);
    @names = ();
    $current_hour = $hour;
  }

  push @names, $name;
}

print_hour($current_hour, @names);

exit;

sub print_hour {
  my ($hour, @names) = @_;
  return unless @names;

  print $hour, ':00:00 ', (join ', ', @names), "\n";
}

__DATA__
10:00:00 Bob
11:00:00 Tom
11:00:20 Fred
11:00:40 George
12:00:00 Bill
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In grouped_by_hour below, for each line from the filehandle, if it has a timestamp and a name, we push that name onto an array associated with the timestamp's hour, using sprintf to normalize the hour in case one timestamp is 03:04:05 and another is 3:9:18.

sub grouped_by_hour {
  my($fh) = @_;

  local $_;
  my %hour_names;

  while (<$fh>) {
    push @{ $hour_names{sprintf "%02d", $1} } => $2
      if /^(\d+):\d+:\d+\s+(.+?)\s*$/;
  }

  wantarray ? %hour_names : \%hour_names;
}

The normalized hours also allow us to sort with the default comparison. The code below places the input in the special DATA filehandle by having it after the __DATA__ token, but in real code, you might call grouped_by_hour $fh.

my %hour_names = grouped_by_hour \*DATA;
foreach my $hour (sort keys %hour_names) {
  print "$hour:00:00 ", join(", " => @{ $hour_names{$hour} }), "\n";
}

__DATA__
10:00:00 Bob
11:00:00 Tom
11:00:20 Fred
11:00:40 George
12:00:00 Bill

Output:

10:00:00 Bob
11:00:00 Tom, Fred, George
12:00:00 Bill
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It's funny how that fat comma makes it look like the array is being pushed into the scalar... –  Zaid Jul 12 '10 at 5:58

Read the file line by line in a block like this:

while(<>) {
    # ... do something with the line in $_
    # specifically, collect the hour and name
    # ignoring malformed lines
    if (/(\d\d):\d\d:\d\d\s+(\w+)/) {
        my $hour = $1;
        my $name = $2;
    }
}

and build a hash with the first bit by inserting the following in the inner if block

$people{$hour} = $people{$hour} . ", " . $name 

Finally, outside the loop, print the hash:

while ( my ($time, $names) = each(%people) ) {
    print $time . ":00:00 " . $names ."\n";
}

(This is untested, but this is the basic approach I would take.)

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2  
The double quotes around the hash keys are unnecessary. –  Ether Jul 10 '10 at 15:10
    
So they are, thanks. Removed. –  Andrew Walker Jul 10 '10 at 16:26

Here's the full solution how to do it.

my @readings = (
    "10:00:00 Bob",
    "11:00:00 Tom",
    "11:00:20 Fred",
    "11:00:40 George",
    "12:00:00 Bill",
);

my %hours;

for my $line (@readings) {
    $line =~ /^(\d{2}).*?([a-zA-Z]+)/;
    push(@{$hours{$1}}, $2);
}

for my $hour (sort keys %hours) {
    print "$hour:00:00 ";
    print join ", ", @{$hours{$hour}};
    print "\n";
}

This results in:

10:00:00 Bob
11:00:00 Tom, Fred, George
12:00:00 Bill
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