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Matthieu M. brought up a pattern for access-protection in this answer that i'd seen before, but never conciously considered a pattern:

class SomeKey { 
    friend class Foo;
    SomeKey() {} 
    // possibly make it non-copyable too
};

class Bar {
public:
    void protectedMethod(SomeKey);
};

Here only a friend of the key class has access to protectedMethod():

class Foo {
    void do_stuff(Bar& b) { 
        b.protectedMethod(SomeKey()); // fine, Foo is friend of SomeKey
    }
};

class Baz {
    void do_stuff(Bar& b) {
        b.protectedMethod(SomeKey()); // error, SomeKey::SomeKey() is private
    }
};

It allows more fine-granular access-control than making Foo a friend of Bar and avoids more complicated proxying patterns.

Does anyone know whether this approach already has a name, i.e., is a known pattern?

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Might be an idea to show how you would actually use those classes. –  anon Jul 10 '10 at 16:54
    
@Neil: Right, that may not be obvious. –  Georg Fritzsche Jul 10 '10 at 17:00
1  
It might be useful to make the key noncopyable, unless you want Foo to be able to delegate access to other classes (of course, delegation might be useful, depending on the circumstances). –  James McNellis Jul 10 '10 at 17:06
1  
Q: could it be defeated with the following hack? char* some_junk_object=new char[...]; SomeKey* p=(SomeKey*)(some_junk_object); b.protectedMethod(*p); If all you're doing is relying on the type system, this is trivial to subvert. (I've seen a similar key system fail spectacularly in a similar way.) –  Owen S. Jul 17 '10 at 19:33
1  
@Owen: If the copy-ctor is accessible, yes - but then again there is no way to protect against everything in C++, there is always some hack around it. We want to protect against mistakes, not deliberate abuse. If we don't want delegation and make the copy-ctor non-public, your hack wouldn't work. –  Georg Fritzsche Jul 17 '10 at 19:46
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1 Answer

It seems that this idiom like one mentioned in another SO question here. It is called Attorney-Client idiom and described in more details there.

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1  
I already linked to another answer to that question and the pattern above doesn't involve proxying through another class. There is no "attorney" we need to call through (they are expensive anyway), instead we simply get access by passing a key along. –  Georg Fritzsche Jul 10 '10 at 17:39
    
@Georg: In what real sense are the attorney calls expensive? If they are stateless, static inlines that merely forward arguments, how would any size or time penalty be introduced? –  Jeff Jul 10 '10 at 18:07
1  
@jeff: The point on expenses was meant to be a pun regarding hourly rates ;) Still, one has to manually forward in the attorney case - you have to write more. –  Georg Fritzsche Jul 10 '10 at 18:21
    
@Georg: sorry, read pun as double entente on the call expense, not on method definition. I generally agree, but I did make a comment in the other question's thread about actual runtime expense. –  Jeff Jul 10 '10 at 18:43
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