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I made a program using C to find whether the entered year is a leap year or not. But unfortunately its not working well. It says a year is leap and the preceding year is not leap.

#include<stdio.h>
#include<conio.h>
int yearr(int year);
void main(void)
{
    int year;
    printf("Enter a year:");
    scanf("%d",&year);
    if(!yearr(year))
    {
        printf("It is a leap year.");
    }
    else
    {
    printf("It is not a leap year");
    }


getch();
}
int yearr(int year)
{
    if((year%4==0)&&(year/4!=0))
    return 1;
    else
    return 0;
}

After reading the comments i edited my coding as:

#include<stdio.h>
#include<conio.h>
int yearr(int year);
void main(void)
{
    int year;
    printf("Enter a year:");
    scanf("%d",&year);
    if(!yearr(year))
    {
        printf("It is a leap year.");
    }
    else
    {
    printf("It is not a leap year");
    }


getch();
}
int yearr(int year)
{
    if((year%4==0)
    {
    if(year%400==0)
    return 1;
    if(year%100==0)
    return 0; 
    }
    else
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
1  
Did it work? Also, code readability is important, so yearr is a poor name for a function to find if a year is a leap year. main returns int in C, not void. –  Alok Singhal Jul 10 '10 at 18:29
    
When compiling the revised code, GCC says: In function ‘yearr’: yearr.c:12: warning: control reaches end of non-void function. If you indent your code properly, you'll find it easier to see why that's the case -- suffice to say, if the year is divisible by 4 but not divisible by 100, you don't tell your caller whether or not that is a leap year. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 29 '11 at 5:21
    
if(!yearr(year)) { printf("It is a leap year."); } else { printf("It is not a leap year"); } Instead of the above one if(yearr(year)) { printf("It is not a leap year."); } else { printf("It is a leap year"); } Don't you think the below one is easy to understand? –  Teju MB Oct 24 '13 at 5:43

9 Answers 9

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Your logic to determine a leap year is wrong. This should get you started (from Wikipedia):

if year modulo 400 is 0
       then is_leap_year
else if year modulo 100 is 0
       then not_leap_year
else if year modulo 4 is 0
       then is_leap_year
else
       not_leap_year

x modulo y means the remainder of x divided by y. For example, 12 modulo 5 is 2.

share|improve this answer

Most efficient leap year test:

if ((year & 3) == 0 && ((year % 25) != 0 || (year & 15) == 0))
{
    /* leap year */
}

This code is valid in C, C++, C#, Java, and many other C-like languages. The code utilizes a single TRUE/FALSE expression that consists of three separate tests:

  • 4th year test: year & 3
  • 100th year test: year % 25
  • 400th year test: year & 15

A complete discussion of how this code works appears below, but first a discussion of Wikipedia's algorithm is called for:

Wikipedia algorithm is INEFFICIENT/UNRELIABLE

Wikipedia has published a pseudo-code algorithm (See: Wikipedia: Leap year - Algorithm) that has been subjected to constant editing, opinion, and vandalism.

DO NOT IMPLEMENT WIKIPEDIA ALGORITHM!

One of the longest-standing (and inefficient) Wikipedia algorithms appeared as follows:

if year modulo 400 is 0 then
   is_leap_year
else if year modulo 100 is 0 then
   not_leap_year
else if year modulo 4 is 0 then
   is_leap_year
else
   not_leap_year

The above algorithm is inefficient because it always performs the tests for the 400th year and 100th year even for years that would quickly fail the "4th year test" (the modulo 4 test)—which is 75% of the time! By re-ordering the algorithm to perform the 4th year test first we speed things up significantly.

"MOST-EFFICIENT" PSEUDO-CODE ALGORITHM

I provided the following algorithm to Wikipedia (more than once):

if year is not divisible by 4 then not leap year
else if year is not divisible by 100 then leap year
else if year is divisible by 400 then leap year
else not leap year

This "most-efficient" pseudo-code simply changes the order of tests so the division by 4 takes place first, followed by the less-frequently occurring tests. Because "year" does not divide by four 75-percent of the time, the algorithm ends after only one test in three out of four cases.

NOTE: I have fought various Wikipedia editors to improve the algorithm published there, arguing that many novice—and professional—programmers quickly arrive at the Wikipedia page (due to top search engine listings) and implement the Wikipedia pseudo-code without any further research. Wikipedia editors repudiated and deleted every attempt I made to improve, annotate or even merely footnote the published algorithm. Apparently, they feel finding efficiencies is the programmer's problem. That may be true, but many programmers are too hurried to perform solid research!

DISCUSSION OF "MOST-EFFICIENT" LEAP YEAR TEST

Bitwise-AND in place of modulo:

I have replaced two of the modulo operations in the Wikipedia algorithm with bitwise-AND operations. Why and how?

Performing a modulo calculation requires division. One doesn't often think twice about this when programming a PC, but when programming 8-bit microcontrollers embedded in small devices you may find that a divide function cannot be natively performed by the CPU. On such CPUs, division is an arduous process involving repetitive looping, bit shifting, and add/subtract operations that is very slow. It is very desirable to avoid.

It turns out that the modulo of powers of two can be alternately achieved using a bitwise-AND operation (see: Wikipedia: Modulo operation - Performance Issues):

x % 2^n == x & (2^n - 1)

Many optimizing compilers will convert such modulo operations to bitwise-AND for you, but less advanced compilers for smaller and less popular CPUs may not. Bitwise-AND is a single instruction on every CPU.

By replacing the modulo 4 and modulo 400 tests with & 3 and & 15 (see below: 'Factoring to reduce math') we can ensure that the fastest code results without using a much slower divide operation.

There exists no power of two that equals 100. Thus, we are forced to continue to use the modulo operation for the 100th year test, however 100 is replaced by 25 (see below).

Factoring to simplify the math:

In addition to using bitwise-AND to replace modulo operations, you may note two additional disputes between the Wikipedia algorithm and the optimized expression:

  • modulo 100 is replaced by modulo 25
  • modulo 400 is replaced by & 15

The 100th year test utilizes modulo 25 instead of modulo 100. We can do this because 100 factors out to 2 x 2 x 5 x 5. Because the 4th year test already checks for factors of 4 we can eliminate that factor from 100, leaving 25. This optimization is probably insignificant to nearly every CPU implementation (as both 100 and 25 fit in 8-bits).

The 400th year test utilizes & 15 which is equivalent to modulo 16. Again, we can do this because 400 factors out to 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 x 5 x 5. We can eliminate the factor of 25 which is tested by the 100th year test, leaving 16. We cannot further reduce 16 because 8 is a factor of 200, so removing any more factors would produce a unwanted positive for a 200th year.

The 400th year optimization is greatly important to 8-bit CPUs, first, because it avoids division; but, more important, because the value 400 is a 9-bit number which is much more difficult to deal with in an 8-bit CPU.

Short-circuit Logical AND/OR operators:

The final, and most important, optimization used are the short-circuit logical AND ('&&') and OR ('||') operators (see: Wikipedia: Short-circuit evaluation), which are implemented in most C-like languages. Short-circuit operators are so named because they do not bother to evaluate the expression on the right side if the expression on the left side, by itself, dictates the outcome of the operation.

For example: If the year is 2003, then year & 3 == 0 is false. There is no way that the tests on the right side of the logical AND can make the outcome true, so nothing else gets evaluated.

By performing the 4th year test first, only the 4th year test (a simple bitwise-AND) is evaluated three-quarters (75 percent) of the time. This speeds up program execution greatly, especially since it avoids the division necessary for the 100th year test (the modulo 25 operation).

NOTE ON PARENTHESES PLACEMENT

One commenter felt parentheses were misplaced in my code and suggested the sub-expressions be regrouped around the logical AND operator (instead of around the logical OR), as follows:

if (((year & 3) == 0 && (year % 25) != 0) || (year & 15) == 0) { /* LY */ }

The above is incorrect. The logical AND operator has higher precedence than logical OR and will be evaluated first with or without the new parentheses. Parentheses around the logical AND arguments has no effect. This might lead one to eliminate the sub-groupings entirely:

if ((year & 3) == 0 && (year % 25) != 0 || (year & 15) == 0) { /* LY */ }

But, in both cases above, the right side of the logical OR (the 400th year test) is evaluated almost every time (i.e., years not divisible by 4 and 100). Thus, a useful optimization has been mistakenly eliminated.

The parentheses in my original code implement the most optimized solution:

if ((year & 3) == 0 && ((year % 25) != 0 || (year & 15) == 0)) { /* LY */ }

Here, the logical OR is only evaluated for years divisible by 4 (because of the short-circuit AND). The right side of the logical OR is only evaluated for years divisible by 4 and 100 (because of the short-circuit OR).

NOTE FOR C/C++ PROGRAMMERS

C/C++ programmers might feel this expression is more optimized:

if (!(year & 3) && ((year % 25) || !(year & 15))) { /* LY */ }

This is not more optimized! While the explicit == 0 and != 0 tests are removed, they become implicit and are still performed. Worse, the code is no longer valid in strongly-typed languages like C# where year & 3 evaluates to an int, but the logical AND (&&), OR (||) and NOT (!) operators require bool arguments.

share|improve this answer
    
@tarabyte Very kind. Thank you. Now, if we can get Wikipedia to publish a better article for the world's benefit... –  Kevin P. Rice Dec 4 '13 at 20:24
    
I understand the efficiency argument, but why do you label Wikipedia's algorithm as "unreliable". In what edge case does it fail? –  Eric J. Dec 17 at 2:02
    
@EricJ. Wikipedia is unreliable because it is constantly edited by anonymous individuals. I have seen incorrect algorithm edits. WP is not a credible source of information, and is often wrong or opinion oriented. It should be viewed as conversive, but not canonical. –  Kevin P. Rice Dec 17 at 7:25
int isLeapYear(int year)
{
   return (year % 400 == 0) || ( ( year % 100 != 0) && (year % 4 == 0 ));
}
share|improve this answer
    
Why the downvote? :( –  st0le Jul 23 '12 at 6:11
    
Inefficiency, primarily due to the order of execution. Mod 400 and Mod 100 must be calculated every time, when the Mod 4 term could have ruled those out 75% of the time (see my answer above). Minor? Yes, in the scheme of things. However, when looking for a reference answer, the Wikipedia algorithm is too-often repeated as a good one (and it isn't very good at all). To some, this detail isn't important, but to me the Wikipedia algorithm is like writing 2/4ths instead of 1/2. –  Kevin P. Rice Mar 16 '13 at 9:06
    
@KevinP.Rice, 2 year old question but I'll bite. If you see OP's code, he's clearly a beginner and never really asked for an efficient implementation. Given the context, If i was a teacher, I'd never recommend the OP to use your answer. Besides, I'd always pick readable code over micro-optimized code any day. But to each his own. Cheers! –  st0le Mar 17 '13 at 21:50
3  
Cheers back! I wouldn't call reversing the order of the terms (put year % 4 first) micro-optimizing, nor would I call the use of modulo especially beginner friendly or readable in the first place. I'm not a disciple of "all code must be plainly understandable"---that's what code comments are for, and I comment my code LIBERALLY! If the most efficient algorithm was well-published to the point of being as canonical as E=MC2, then no one would challenge it's readability. Instead, the weak algorithm on Wikipedia has become canonical and the world stands still. Rant done. Happy St.P Day! –  Kevin P. Rice Mar 18 '13 at 2:34
    
@KevinP.Rice, Happy St. Patty's Day! :D –  st0le Mar 18 '13 at 5:23

Although the logic that divides by 400 first is impeccable, it is not as computationally efficient as dividing by 4 first. You can do that with the logic:

#define LEAPYEAR(y) ((y % 4) == 0 && ((y % 100) != 0 || (y % 400) == 0))

This divides by 4 for every value, but for 3/4 of them, the testing terminates there. For the 1/4 that pass the first test, it then divides by 100, eliminating 24/25 values; for the remaining 1 out of a 100, it divides by 400 too, coming up with a final answer. Granted, this is not a huge saving.

share|improve this answer
    
You should replace y % 4 with y & 3, and replace y % 400 with y & 15. Rationale: modulus division is slow on some platforms whereas a single bitwise-AND is typically one instruction cycle. Some language compilers perform this optimization automatically, but baking it into the code guarantees it. Modulo 400 is able to be replaced with & 15 because 16 is a factor of 400 but not 100 (or 200). For 8-bit systems, the & 15 is much easier to deal with. Technically, % 100 can be replaced with % 25 but this is not likely an improvement for any system. –  Kevin P. Rice Jul 21 '12 at 9:15
    
@Kevin P. Rice Will replacing y % 4 with y & 3 work correctly if the integers are not 2's complement and y < 0? –  chux Nov 26 at 16:20
    
@KevinP.Rice: The switch from Julian to Gregorian is a good bit more complex than "it happened in 1582". Many Roman Catholic countries changed in 1584; countries under British sway changed in 1752; other countries changed at different times (Russia in the 20th century; the Russian Orthodox church still hasn't changed, AFAIK). Check the output from cal 9 1752 on a Unix-ish machine. Also, for negative values of year, you have to wrestle with the presence or absence of a year 0. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 26 at 22:51
    
@chux [REPOST] No. Negative modulo 4 values (i.e., -4, -8, -12, ...) are represented in two's complement binary with the last two digits being zero. This doesn't work for one's complement representations. Keep in mind also, use of this algorithm would be improper for y < 1582 as the Gregorian calendar wasn't introduced until the year 1582. Further complications are pointed out by @JonathanLeffler (supra). –  Kevin P. Rice Nov 26 at 22:56
    
@KevinP.Rice: It seems I mis-remembered 1584 as being special; it was indeed in 1582 that Pope Gregory decreed the use of the Gregorian calendar, and most Roman Catholic countries put it into effect in that year, but not all. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 26 at 22:59

From Wikipedia article on Leap year:

if (year modulo 4 is 0) and (year modulo 100 is not 0) or (year modulo 400 is 0)
   then is_leap_year
else
   not_leap_year
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, this is the fact. nice one –  Ripon Al Wasim Jan 30 '13 at 6:07

The problem with your code is that you are returning a non-zero value from yearr if you think that the year is a leap year. So you don't need the ! in your if statement.

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http://www.wwu.edu/depts/skywise/leapyear.html

Leap Year Rules

There is a leap year every year whose number is perfectly divisible by four - except for years which are both divisible by 100 and not divisible by 400. The second part of the rule effects century years. For example; the century years 1600 and 2000 are leap years, but the century years 1700, 1800, and 1900 are not. This means that three times out of every four hundred years there are eight years between leap years.

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 if(year%400 ==0 || (year%100 != 0 && year%4 == 0))
    {
        printf("Year %d is a leap year",year);
    }
    else
    {
        printf("Year %d is not a leap year",year);
    }

Change it like above. Also read this.

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6  
Not a good idea to provide solution to a homework problem. –  Alok Singhal Jul 10 '10 at 17:34

    #include 
    void main(void)
    {
        int year;
        printf("Enter a year to check if it is Leap Year\n");
        scanf("%d",&year);
        if(year%400==0) /* Why  mod 400 */
            printf("%d is a Leap Year\n",year);
        else if(year%100==0) /*  Why  mod 100  */
            printf("%d is not a Leap Year\n",year);
        else if(year%4==0)
            printf("%d is a Leap Year\n",year);
        else
            printf("%d is not a Leap Year\n",year);

    }

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