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We have a webpage that can be hosted in an iframe on another site. When it's shown in another website we override the css to have the l&f of that site.

What happens is when someone changes the css class name or properties in the webpage it might look bad on other site where it's hosted until we detect and change it.

If there is a way to detect this before the change goes live we can make change it for the other site as well.

Some kind of html,css capture tool which can say if there is any difference in the css classes on the html elements or the properties

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might be a question for serverfault.com –  eruciform Jul 10 '10 at 23:48
    
is there any version control in effect? if they're both deployed directly from git or svn, a simple svn diff or git diff would do it. –  eruciform Jul 10 '10 at 23:49
    
the problem is the whole page is constructed from various sources and it's really difficult to diff it at that point. I am looking for a diff at the end point (browser) for the html and the css –  Ands Jul 11 '10 at 5:29

1 Answer 1

I hope you have templates!

If you don't (and therefore can't just diff them on a commit trigger or the like) ...

As you don't state the language your site is coded in, giving advice is difficult. Instrumenting a web application to catch these things will also be (I may be wrong), non deterministic as the control flow of the program will affect the outcome.

I would advise using a tool to capture and replay test traffic to your web application, then compare the output of the returned buffers after stripping any application-variable output.

You could also wrap something like printf or echo or whatever your language uses to detect a set {text, line number, file} and compare the HTML in these.

Ultimately, why bother?? seems like a pointless exercise to me. Just run a HTML/CSS/whatever validator on the output and actually use the site to check it looks ok. And if your HTML isn't separate from your model/business logic then you have bigger worries anyway.

  1. wget
  2. libxml2
  3. diff
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I have explained more in my question to make it more clearer. –  Ands Jul 11 '10 at 5:25

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