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Can anyone point me towards a sorting algorithm in javascript that would sort the same way SQL Server does (for nvarchar/unicode columns)?

For reference, my previous question about this behavior can be found here: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/3213717/sql-server-2008-different-sort-orders-on-varchar-vs-nvarchar-values

Rather than attempting to change the sorting behavior on the server side, is there a way I can match this on the client side? My previous question specifically talked about dashes in sort orders, but I'm going to assume there's a little more to it than simply ignoring dashes as part of the sort.

I have added some additional use cases here to better demonstrate the issue

Sorting using Brock Adam's suggested first method from below:

Brochures distributed  
Calls Received  
Exhibit Visitors  
-Exhibit Visitors  
--Exhibit Visitors  
Grails Found  
^&$Grails Found  
bags of Garbage  
?test  
Ëxhibit Visitors  

Sorting from SQL Server (2008):

?test  
^&$Grails Found  
bags of Garbage  
Brochures distributed  
Calls Received  
exhibit visitors  
Exhibit Visitors  
-Exhibit Visitors  
--Exhibit Visitors  
Ëxhibit Visitors  
Grails Found  

Please let me know if I can further clarify.

share|improve this question
    
So, from that question, you want the JavaScript to now sort Unicode A before Unicode -A? –  Brock Adams Jul 11 '10 at 0:42
    
@Brock - correct, although more specifically, I want a javascript sort algorithm that will match that on the server side (I imagine there's more to consider than "-" characters) –  DanP Jul 11 '10 at 1:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted
+50

First what is your database collation? I'm going to assume it's SQL_Latin1_General_CP1_CS_AS or SQL_Latin1_General_CP1_CI_AS. If so, then the following should work (not fully tested, yet).

It looks like writing a true Unicode sorter is a major undertaking. I've seen tax codes that were more straightforward than the specs. ;-) It always seems to involve lookup table(s) and at least a 3-level sort -- with modifying characters and contractions to account for.

I've limited the following to the Latin 1, Latin Extended-A, and Latin Extended-B tables/collation. The algorithm should work on those sets fairly well but I've not fully tested it nor properly accounted for modifying characters (to save speed and complexity).

See it in action at jsbin.com.

Function:

function bIgnoreForPrimarySort (iCharCode)
{
    /*--- A bunch of characters get ignored for the primary sort weight.
        The most important ones are the hyphen and apostrophe characters.
        A bunch of control characters and a couple of odds and ends, make up
        the rest.
    */
    if (iCharCode < 9)                                                  return true;

    if (iCharCode >= 14   &&  iCharCode <= 31)                          return true;

    if (iCharCode >= 127  &&  iCharCode <= 159)                         return true;

    if (iCharCode == 39   ||  iCharCode == 45  ||  iCharCode == 173)    return true;

    return false;
}


function SortByRoughSQL_Latin1_General_CP1_CS_AS (sA, sB)
{
    /*--- This Sorts Latin1 and extended Latin1 unicode with an approximation
        of SQL's SQL_Latin1_General_CP1_CS_AS collation.
        Certain modifying characters or contractions my be off (not tested), we trade-off
        perfect accuracy for speed and relative simplicity.

        True unicode sorting is devilishly complex and we're not getting paid enough to
        fully implement it in Javascript.  ;-)

        It looks like a definative sort would require painstaking exegesis of documents
        such as: http://unicode.org/reports/tr10/
    */
    //--- This is the master lookup table for Latin1 code-points.  Here through the extended set \u02AF
    //--- Make this static?
    var aSortOrder  = [
                     -1,  151,  152,  153,  154,  155,  156,  157,  158,    2,    3,    4,    5,    6,  159,  160,  161,  162,  163,  164,
                    165,  166,  167,  168,  169,  170,  171,  172,  173,  174,  175,  176,    0,    7,    8,    9,   10,   11,   12,  210,
                     13,   14,   15,   41,   16,  211,   17,   18,   65,   69,   71,   74,   76,   77,   80,   81,   82,   83,   19,   20,
                     42,   43,   44,   21,   22,  214,  257,  266,  284,  308,  347,  352,  376,  387,  419,  427,  438,  459,  466,  486,
                    529,  534,  538,  559,  576,  595,  636,  641,  647,  650,  661,   23,   24,   25,   26,   27,   28,  213,  255,  265,
                    283,  307,  346,  350,  374,  385,  418,  426,  436,  458,  464,  485,  528,  533,  536,  558,  575,  594,  635,  640,
                    646,  648,  660,   29,   30,   31,   32,  177,  178,  179,  180,  181,  182,  183,  184,  185,  186,  187,  188,  189,
                    190,  191,  192,  193,  194,  195,  196,  197,  198,  199,  200,  201,  202,  203,  204,  205,  206,  207,  208,  209,
                      1,   33,   53,   54,   55,   56,   34,   57,   35,   58,  215,   46,   59,  212,   60,   36,   61,   45,   72,   75,
                     37,   62,   63,   64,   38,   70,  487,   47,   66,   67,   68,   39,  219,  217,  221,  231,  223,  233,  250,  276,
                    312,  310,  316,  318,  392,  390,  395,  397,  295,  472,  491,  489,  493,  503,  495,   48,  511,  599,  597,  601,
                    603,  652,  590,  573,  218,  216,  220,  230,  222,  232,  249,  275,  311,  309,  315,  317,  391,  389,  394,  396,
                    294,  471,  490,  488,  492,  502,  494,   49,  510,  598,  596,  600,  602,  651,  589,  655,  229,  228,  227,  226,
                    235,  234,  268,  267,  272,  271,  270,  269,  274,  273,  286,  285,  290,  287,  324,  323,  322,  321,  314,  313,
                    326,  325,  320,  319,  358,  357,  362,  361,  356,  355,  364,  363,  378,  377,  380,  379,  405,  404,  403,  402,
                    401,  400,  407,  406,  393,  388,  417,  416,  421,  420,  432,  431,  428,  440,  439,  447,  446,  444,  443,  442,
                    441,  450,  449,  468,  467,  474,  473,  470,  469,  477,  484,  483,  501,  500,  499,  498,  507,  506,  527,  526,
                    540,  539,  544,  543,  542,  541,  561,  560,  563,  562,  567,  566,  565,  564,  580,  579,  578,  577,  593,  592,
                    611,  610,  609,  608,  607,  606,  613,  612,  617,  616,  615,  614,  643,  642,  654,  653,  656,  663,  662,  665,
                    664,  667,  666,  574,  258,  260,  262,  261,  264,  263,  281,  278,  277,  304,  292,  289,  288,  297,  335,  337,
                    332,  348,  349,  369,  371,  382,  415,  409,  434,  433,  448,  451,  462,  476,  479,  509,  521,  520,  524,  523,
                    531,  530,  552,  572,  571,  569,  570,  583,  582,  581,  585,  632,  631,  634,  638,  658,  657,  669,  668,  673,
                    677,  676,  678,   73,   79,   78,  680,  644,   50,   51,   52,   40,  303,  302,  301,  457,  456,  455,  482,  481,
                    480,  225,  224,  399,  398,  497,  496,  605,  604,  626,  625,  620,  619,  624,  623,  622,  621,  334,  241,  240,
                    237,  236,  254,  253,  366,  365,  360,  359,  430,  429,  505,  504,  515,  514,  675,  674,  422,  300,  299,  298,
                    354,  353,   84,   85,   86,   87,  239,  238,  252,  251,  513,  512,  243,  242,  245,  244,  328,  327,  330,  329,
                    411,  410,  413,  412,  517,  516,  519,  518,  547,  546,  549,  548,  628,  627,  630,  629,   88,   89,   90,   91,
                     92,   93,   94,   95,   96,   97,   98,   99,  100,  101,  102,  103,  104,  105,  106,  107,  108,  109,  110,  111,
                    112,  113,  114,  115,  116,  117,  118,  119,  120,  121,  122,  123,  124,  125,  126,  127,  128,  129,  130,  131,
                    132,  133,  134,  135,  136,  137,  138,  139,  140,  141,  142,  143,  246,  247,  248,  259,  279,  280,  293,  291,
                    339,  336,  338,  331,  340,  341,  342,  423,  367,  373,  351,  370,  372,  383,  381,  384,  408,  414,  386,  445,
                    453,  452,  454,  461,  463,  460,  475,  478,  465,  508,  522,  525,  532,  550,  553,  554,  555,  545,  556,  557,
                    537,  551,  568,  333,  424,  343,  344,  586,  584,  618,  633,  637,  639,  645,  659,  649,  670,  671,  672,  679,
                    681,  682,  683,  282,  686,  256,  345,  368,  375,  425,  435,  437,  535,  684,  685,  305,  296,  306,  591,  587,
                    588,  144,  145,  146,  147,  148,  149,  150
                    ];

    var iLenA           = sA.length,    iLenB           = sB.length;
    var jA              = 0,            jB              = 0;
    var sIgnoreBuff_A   = [],           sIgnoreBuff_B   = [];


    function iSortIgnoreBuff ()
    {
        var iIgLenA = sIgnoreBuff_A.length, iIgLenB = sIgnoreBuff_B.length;
        var kA      = 0,                    kB      = 0;

        while (kA < iIgLenA  &&  kB < iIgLenB)
        {
            var igA = sIgnoreBuff_A [kA++],  igB = sIgnoreBuff_B [kB++];

            if (aSortOrder[igA]  >  aSortOrder[igB] )   return 1;
            if (aSortOrder[igA]  <  aSortOrder[igB] )   return -1;
        }
        //--- All else equal, longest string loses
        if (iIgLenA > iIgLenB)      return 1;
        if (iIgLenA < iIgLenB)      return -1;

        return 0;
    }


    while (jA < iLenA  &&  jB < iLenB)
    {
        var cA  = sA.charCodeAt (jA++);
        var cB  = sB.charCodeAt (jB++);

        if (cA == cB)
        {
            continue;
        }

        while (bIgnoreForPrimarySort (cA) )
        {
            sIgnoreBuff_A.push (cA);
            if (jA < iLenA)
                cA  = sA.charCodeAt (jA++);
            else
                break;
        }
        while (bIgnoreForPrimarySort (cB) )
        {
            sIgnoreBuff_B.push (cB);
            if (jB < iLenB)
                cB  = sB.charCodeAt (jB++);
            else
                break;
        }

        /*--- Have we reached the end of one or both strings, ending on an ignore char?
            The strings were equal, up to that point.
            If one of the strings is NOT an ignore char, while the other is, it wins.
        */
        if (bIgnoreForPrimarySort (cA) )
        {
            if (! bIgnoreForPrimarySort (cB))   return -1;
        }
        else if (bIgnoreForPrimarySort (cB) )
        {
            return 1;
        }
        else
        {
            if (aSortOrder[cA]  >  aSortOrder[cB] )
                return 1;

            if (aSortOrder[cA]  <  aSortOrder[cB] )
                return -1;

            //--- We are equal, so far, on the main chars.  Where there ignore chars?
            var iBuffSort   = iSortIgnoreBuff ();
            if (iBuffSort)  return iBuffSort;

            //--- Still here?  Reset the ignore arrays.
            sIgnoreBuff_A   = [];
            sIgnoreBuff_B   = [];
        }

    } //-- while (jA < iLenA  &&  jB < iLenB)

    /*--- We have gone through all of at least one string and they are still both
        equal barring ignore chars or unequal lengths.
    */
    var iBuffSort   = iSortIgnoreBuff ();
    if (iBuffSort)  return iBuffSort;

    //--- All else equal, longest string loses
    if (iLenA > iLenB)      return 1;
    if (iLenA < iLenB)      return -1;

    return 0;

} //-- function SortByRoughSQL_Latin1_General_CP1_CS_AS

Test:

var aPhrases    = [
                    'Grails Found',
                    '--Exhibit Visitors',
                    '-Exhibit Visitors',
                    'Exhibit Visitors',
                    'Calls Received',
                    'Ëxhibit Visitors',
                    'Brochures distributed',
                    'exhibit visitors',
                    'bags of Garbage',
                    '^&$Grails Found',
                    '?test'
                ];

aPhrases.sort (SortByRoughSQL_Latin1_General_CP1_CS_AS);

console.log (aPhrases.join ('\n') );

Results:

?test
^&$Grails Found
bags of Garbage
Brochures distributed
Calls Received
exhibit visitors
Exhibit Visitors
-Exhibit Visitors
--Exhibit Visitors
Ëxhibit Visitors
Grails Found
share|improve this answer
    
I've verified that the server collation is set to: SQL_Latin1_General_CP1_CI_AS, I will investigate your method to see how it pans out. As an aside, I think I was a little cheap with the bounty...if this works, I will allow it to expire before accepting your answer so that I can award you a higher one (what seems fair/reasonable?) –  DanP Jul 16 '10 at 16:18
    
@DanP: Don't worry about the bounty (unless you don't get a satisfactory answer without one). I love points, but I also do these things to help and as a challenge -- instead of, say, Sudoku or a crossword. –  Brock Adams Jul 16 '10 at 22:37
    
this looks great to me! –  Patricia Jul 19 '10 at 20:33
    
I think this is about as close to perfect as we could hope for, thanks so much for your help on this one (Stackoverflow needs a 'buy beer' function!) –  DanP Jul 19 '10 at 20:56
    
@DanP: You're welcome. If you find cases where it doesn't work, We'd still like to know (but fixing them might be a bear). –  Brock Adams Jul 19 '10 at 22:14

Sorry, JavaScript has no collation features. The only string comparison you get is directly on the UTF-16 code units in a String, as returned by charCodeAt().

For characters inside the Basic Multilingual Plane, that's the same as a binary collation, so if you need JS and SQL Server to agree (ignoring the astral planes anyway), I think that's the only way you're going to do it. (Short of building a string collator in JS and meticulously copying SQL Server's collation rules, anyway. Not a lot of fun there.)

(What's the use case, why do they need to match?)

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the insights; use case is pretty simple - I'm sending back sorted data from sql server and have client-side sorting capabilities in a table. When they disagree, I have issues when paging, etc. –  DanP Jul 11 '10 at 1:14

Update:

This approach was never more than a quick-and-dirty stab at the problem.
It didn't work. See my 2nd answer.


A First-pass at the problem, sorting by "word precedence" in the manner Microsoft indicated, follows. Maybe the following routine is good enough? (Or can be adjusted):

function SortByPseudoMS_SQL_UnicodeRules (sA, sB)
{
    /*--- This attempts to duplicate the sorting of MS SQL, a la:
        "Unicode sorting rules use a "word sort" that ignores (¿non-word characters?).
        That was from: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/322112

        It looks like a definitive sort would require painstaking exegesis of documents
        such as: http://unicode.org/reports/tr10/
    */
    var sKeyTextA, sKeyTextB;

    //--- Note that regex: \w and \W are not unicode aware.
    sKeyTextA       = sA.replace (/[^a-zA-Z\u00C0-\u02AE]/g, '');   //-- Are numbers words?
    sKeyTextB       = sB.replace (/[^a-zA-Z\u00C0-\u02AE]/g, '');

    /*--- Now sort with "word precedence". ---
    */
    if      (sKeyTextA > sKeyTextB)
        return 1;
    else if (sKeyTextA < sKeyTextB)
        return -1;
    else
    {
        /*--- This is a special case.  If two items are nominally the same, subsort
            by non-word chars.   This may miss some edge cases but is hopefully good enough
            for initial use.

            May have to loop, char-by-char, at this stage.
        */
        sKeyTextA   = sA.replace (/[a-zA-Z\u00C0-\u02AE]/g, '');
        sKeyTextB   = sB.replace (/[a-zA-Z\u00C0-\u02AE]/g, '');

        if      (sKeyTextA > sKeyTextB)
            return 1;
        else if (sKeyTextA < sKeyTextB)
            return -1;
        else
            return 0;
    }
}

Test Data and Use:

var aPhrases    = [];
aPhrases [0]    = 'AB C';
aPhrases [1]    = 'A BC';
aPhrases [2]    = 'ABC';
aPhrases [3]    = 'A B';
aPhrases [4]    = 'A-B';
aPhrases [5]    = 'AB';
aPhrases [6]    = ' A';
aPhrases [7]    = '-A';
aPhrases [8]    = 'A';
aPhrases [9]    = 'X2Y';
aPhrases [10]   = 'X1Y';
aPhrases [11]   = 'X11YY';
aPhrases [12]   = 'X1YY';
aPhrases [13]   = 'Ë';
aPhrases [14]   = 'Á';

/*--- Sort the array by our custom criteria.
*/
aPhrases.sort (SortByPseudoMS_SQL_UnicodeRules);

//-- If not using Firebug, replace console.log() with alert().
console.log (aPhrases.join ('\n') );

Results:

A
 A
-A
AB
A B
A-B
ABC
AB C
A BC
X1Y
X2Y
X1YY
X11YY
Á
Ë
share|improve this answer
    
This looks really promising - let me work with this a little after the weekend - if all looks well I will mark this as the answer. –  DanP Jul 11 '10 at 1:51
    
unfortunately, we've found quite a few cases that this doesn't work for, if you'd be interested in tweaking your initial algorithm above, I can provide some sample data. –  DanP Jul 15 '10 at 1:16
    
@DanP: Sure. Let's see the sample data. You can use pastebin.com if it's too big to add to this question. –  Brock Adams Jul 15 '10 at 1:23
    
Adamins - will do, I'll get some of the failing cases added to either here or pastebin tomorrow; I'm eager to get a working solution together, so I'd be more than willing to add a bounty to this question if that helps :) –  DanP Jul 15 '10 at 2:14
    
I have updated the question with some additional use cases (and added a bounty) - if you would like any further information, just let me know! –  DanP Jul 15 '10 at 14:39

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