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Does Perl have a build-in function to get the index of an element in an array? Or I need write such a function by myself? [ equivalent to PHP array_search() or JavaScript array.indexOf() ]

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7  
What's in the array? Searching an array is a red flag that causes me to evaluate whether I could be using a better data structure. Remember: hashes are for searching! –  Greg Bacon Jul 11 '10 at 11:19
1  
Duplicate: stackoverflow.com/questions/1915746/… –  FMc Jul 11 '10 at 14:01

4 Answers 4

up vote 28 down vote accepted
use List::Util qw(first);
$idx = first { $array[$_] eq 'whatever' } 0..$#array;

(List::Util is core)

or

use List::MoreUtils qw(firstidx);
$idx = firstidx { $_ eq 'whatever' } @array;

(List::MoreUtils is on CPAN)

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2  
This is definitely the way to go, 9 times out of 10. –  Zaid Jul 11 '10 at 7:21
    
Why is this better than your solution, Zaid? –  masonk Jul 11 '10 at 13:52
1  
@masonk : Backwards-compatibility for one. Also, first will exit the implicit loop upon finding the index that matches. The grep equivalent would be $idx = grep { $array[$_] eq 'whatever' and last } 0 .. $#array;, a bit hairy for my liking. And then it's miles ahead in the speed-race, when run as List::Util::XS. –  Zaid Jul 11 '10 at 14:24
    
Just realized you can't last out of grep cleanly. Whoops! –  Zaid Jul 11 '10 at 20:26

Here's a post-5.10 way to do it, with the added benefit of determining how many indexes match the given value.

my @matches = grep { $array[$_] ~~ $element } 0 .. $#array;

If all elements are guaranteed to be unique, or just the first index is of interest:

my ($index) = grep { $array[$_] ~~ $element } 0 .. $#array;
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That answer does not fit the question. The index is what goes into the square brackets for array access, so: a number between 0 and $#array. –  daxim Jul 11 '10 at 11:49
    
@daxim : Aren't we after the index of the match(es) here? –  Zaid Jul 11 '10 at 13:11
    
Actually, the answer does fit the question, and very nicely. –  masonk Jul 11 '10 at 13:51
    
What does ~~ mean? –  Alexander Farber Jun 11 '11 at 21:20
    
@Alexander : ~~ is the smart match operator. Think of it as an operator that is smart enough to figure out what you want based on the LHS/RHS data types. –  Zaid Jun 12 '11 at 12:53

Here is an autobox solution:

use autobox::Core;

my @things = qw/blue black green red green yellow/;

my $first_green = @things->first_index( sub{ $_[0] eq 'green' } ); # code block
my $last_green  = @things->last_index ( qr/^green$/ );             # or regex

say $first_green;    # => 2
say $last_green;     # => 4

/I3az/

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2  
upvote for autobox hilariousness –  masonk Jul 11 '10 at 13:47

You can write a function for this:

sub array_search {
    my ($arr, $elem) = @_;
    my $idx;
    for my $i (0..$#$arr) {
        if ($arr->[$i] eq $elem) {
            $idx = $i;
            last;
        }
    }
    return $idx;            
}

The index of the first matching element will be returned, or undef.

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My final solution: sub array_search { my ($element, @array) = @_; foreach (0..$#array) { if ($array[$_] eq $element) { return $_; } } return -1; } –  powerboy Jul 11 '10 at 16:53

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