Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have multiple large objects which each have about 60 strings. I have to trim all those strings, and I'd like to do so without having to go this.mystring = this.mystring.Trim(). Instead, I'm looking for a way to automatically have each object discover its own strings and then perform the operation.

I know a little bit about reflection, but not enough, but I think this is possible?

Also, I'm not sure if this matters, but some string properties are read-only (only have a getter), so those properties would have to be skipped.

Help?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Well, it's easy enough to get all the properties, and find out which ones are strings and writable. LINQ makes it even easier.

var props = instance.GetType()
                    .GetProperties(BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.Public)
                    // Ignore non-string properties
                    .Where(prop => prop.PropertyType == typeof(string))
                    // Ignore indexers
                    .Where(prop => prop.GetIndexParameters().Length == 0)
                    // Must be both readable and writable
                    .Where(prop => prop.CanWrite && prop.CanRead);

foreach (PropertyInfo prop in props)
{
    string value = (string) prop.GetValue(instance, null);
    if (value != null)
    {
        value = value.Trim();
        prop.SetValue(instance, value, null);
    }
}

You may want to only set the property if trimming actually makes a difference, to avoid redundant computations for complex properties - or it may not be an issue for you.

There are various ways of improving the performance if necessary - things like:

  • Simply caching the relevant properties for each type
  • Using Delegate.CreateDelegate to build delegates for the getters and setters
  • Possibly using expression trees, although I'm not sure whether they'd help here

I wouldn't take any of those steps unless performance is actually a problem though.

share|improve this answer
    
I thought property trees are automatically cached if not in debug mode? I've read that a few times. Is this not true? –  Alex Jul 11 '10 at 8:01
1  
In this case, Expression would be a pain, even in 4.0; combining multiple Action<T,string> into a single delegate would work well, though. –  Marc Gravell Jul 11 '10 at 8:01
    
@Alex - lambda expressions in the source can do some clever things, using a backing delegate field. However, AFAIK that is not true of trees built manually and compiled (Compile) at runtime. –  Marc Gravell Jul 11 '10 at 8:03
    
your example misses a cast from prop.GetValue to String –  Alex Jul 11 '10 at 8:18
    
@Alex: Thanks, fixed. –  Jon Skeet Jul 11 '10 at 8:30

Something like:

    foreach (PropertyInfo prop in obj.GetType().GetProperties(
        BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.Public))
    {
        if (prop.CanRead && prop.CanWrite && prop.PropertyType == typeof(string)
            && (prop.GetIndexParameters().Length == 0)) // watch for indexers!
        {
            var s = (string)prop.GetValue(obj, null);
            if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(s)) s = s.Trim();
            prop.SetValue(obj, s, null);
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
The parameterless Type.GetProperties() call includes static properties, which I suspect shouldn't be included here. –  Jon Skeet Jul 11 '10 at 7:57
1  
@Jon - good point, thanks. I won't mention IsReadable ;p Also - you might want to check for indexers. –  Marc Gravell Jul 11 '10 at 8:00
    
@Marc: Will fix :) –  Jon Skeet Jul 11 '10 at 8:17
    
Could you explain why you check for prop.GetIndexParameters().Length == 0? What does this do? –  Alex Jul 11 '10 at 8:17
    
@Alex: It stops it from picking up indexers. –  Jon Skeet Jul 11 '10 at 8:18

So to expand on this a little, I have a complex object with Lists of Lists and I wanted to traverse that and trim all of the child string objects as well. I'm posting what I did as of what I built on from @Jon did in his answer. I'm curious if there was a better way to do it or if I missed something obvious.

The objects I have are more complex than this but it should illustrate what I was trying.

public class Customer
{
  public string Name { get; set; }
  public List<Contact> Contacts { get; set; }
}

public class Contact
{
  public string Name { get; set; }
  public List<Email> EmailAddresses {get; set;}
}

public class Email
{
  public string EmailAddress {get; set;}
}


    private void TrimWhitespace(object instance)
    {
        if (instance != null)
        {
            var props = instance.GetType()
                    .GetProperties(BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.Public)
                // Ignore indexers
                    .Where(prop => prop.GetIndexParameters().Length == 0)
                // Must be both readable and writable
                    .Where(prop => prop.CanWrite && prop.CanRead);

            foreach (PropertyInfo prop in props)
            {
                if (instance is IEnumerable)
                {
                    foreach (var item in (IEnumerable)instance)
                    {
                        TrimWhitespace(item);
                    }
                }
                else if (prop.GetValue(instance, null) is string)
                {
                    string value = (string)prop.GetValue(instance, null);
                    if (value != null)
                    {
                        value = value.Trim();
                        prop.SetValue(instance, value, null);
                    }
                }
                else 
                    TrimWhitespace(prop.GetValue(instance, null));
            }
        }
    }

Thoughts?

share|improve this answer

Not necessary to make IEnumerable check in the props-loop and if actual instance is a IEnumerable, props are ignored. Fix for IEnumerable part:

private void TrimWhitespace(object instance)
{
    if (instance != null)
    {
        if (instance is IEnumerable)
        {
            foreach (var item in (IEnumerable)instance)
            {
                TrimWhitespace(item);
            }
        }

        var props = instance.GetType()
                .GetProperties(BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.Public)
            // Ignore indexers
                .Where(prop => prop.GetIndexParameters().Length == 0)
            // Must be both readable and writable
                .Where(prop => prop.CanWrite && prop.CanRead);

        foreach (PropertyInfo prop in props)
        {
            if (prop.GetValue(instance, null) is string)
            {
                string value = (string)prop.GetValue(instance, null);
                if (value != null)
                {
                    value = value.Trim();
                    prop.SetValue(instance, value, null);
                }
            }
            else 
                TrimWhitespace(prop.GetValue(instance, null));
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.