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I'm reading some books about Design Patterns and while some describe the relation between the abstraction and the implementation as a composition, some describe it as an aggregation. Now I wonder: is this dependant on the implementation? On the language? Or context?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The terms "composition" and "aggregation" mean more or less the same thing and may be used interchangeably. Aggregation may be used more frequently when describing container classes such as lists, dynamic arrays, maps, and queues where the elements are all of the same type; however, both terms may be found to describe classes defined in terms of other classes, regardless of whether those types are homogenous (all of the same type) or heterogenous (objects of different types).

To make this clearer:

class Car {
    // ...
    private:
        Engine engine;
        Hood hood;
};

// The car is *composed* of an engine and a hood. Hence, composition. You are
// also bringing together (i.e. *aggregating*) an engine and hood into a car.

The relationship between abstraction and implementation typically implies inheritance, rather than composition/aggregation; typically the abstraction is an interface or virtual base class, and the implementation is a fully concrete class that implements the given interface. But, to make things confusing, composition/aggregation can be a part of the interface (because, for example, you may need to set/get the objects that are used as building blocks), and they are also an approach to implementation (because you might use delegation to provide the definition for methods in your implementation).

To make this clearer:

interface Car {
    public Engine getEngine();
    public Hood getHood();
    public void drive();
}
// In the above, the fact that a car has these building blocks
// is a part of its interface (the abstraction).

class HondaCivic2010 implements Car {
    public void drive(){ getEngine().drive(); }
    // ...
}
// In the above, composition/delegation is an implementation
// strategy for providing the drive functionality.

Since you have tagged your question "bridge", I should point out that the definition of the bridge pattern is a pattern where you use composition rather than inheritance to allow for variation at multiple different levels. An example that I learned at college... using inheritance you might have something like:

class GoodCharacter;
class BadCharacter;
class Mage;
class Rogue;
class GoodMage : public GoodCharacter, Mage;
class BadMage : public BadCharacter, Mage;
class GoodRogue : public GoodCharacter, Rogue;
class BadRogue : public BadCharacter, Rogue;

As you can see, this kind of thing goes pretty crazy, and you get a ridiculous number of classes. The same thing, with the bridge pattern, would look like:

 class Personality;
 class GoodPersonality : public Personality;
 class BadPersonality : public Personality;

 class CharacterClass;
 class Mage : public CharacterClass;
 class Rogue : public CharacterClass;

 class Character {
    public:
        // ...
    private:
        CharacterClass character_class;
        Personality personality;
 };
 // A character has both a character class and a personality.
 // This is a perfect example of the bridge pattern, and we've
 // reduced MxN classes into a mere M+N classes, and we've
 // arguably made the system even more flexible than before.
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2  
wonderful explanation of the bridge pattern. Thanks! –  pankajt Oct 3 '11 at 15:50

the bridge pattern must use delegation (aggregation/composition and not inheritance). from the gang-of-four book:

Use the Bridge pattern when

* you want to avoid a permanent binding between an abstraction and its implementation. This might be the case, for example, when the implementation must be selected or switched at run-time.

* both the abstractions and their implementations should be extensible by subclassing. In this case, the Bridge pattern lets you combine the different abstractions and implementations and extend them independently.

* changes in the implementation of an abstraction should have no impact on clients; that is, their code should not have to be recompiled.

* (C++) you want to hide the implementation of an abstraction completely from clients. In C++ the representation of a class is visible in the class interface.

* you have a proliferation of classes as shown earlier in the first Motivation diagram. Such a class hierarchy indicates the need for splitting an object into two parts. Rumbaugh uses the term "nested generalizations" [RBP+91] to refer to such class hierarchies.

* you want to share an implementation among multiple objects (perhaps using reference counting), and this fact should be hidden from the client. A simple example is Coplien's String class [Cop92], in which multiple objects can share the same string representation (StringRep).
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Standard UML of Bridge pattern clears out all air around the confusion. Below is an explanation with a brief example to clear the air around this.

Apologies for this lengthy code, best way is to copy this code to Visual Studio to easily understand it.

Read through the explanation written at the end of code

interface ISpeak
{
    void Speak();
}

class DogSpeak : ISpeak
{
    public void Speak()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Dog Barks");
    }
}
class CatSpeak : ISpeak
{
    public void Speak()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Cat Meows");
    }
}

abstract class AnimalBridge
{
    protected ISpeak Speech;

    protected AnimalBridge(ISpeak speech)
    {
        this.Speech = speech;
    }

    public abstract void Speak();
}
class Dog : AnimalBridge
{
    public Dog(ISpeak dogSpeak)
        : base(dogSpeak)
    {

    }
    public override void Speak()
    {
        Speech.Speak();
    }
}

class Cat : AnimalBridge
{
    public Cat(ISpeak catSpeak)
        : base(catSpeak)
    {

    }
    public override void Speak()
    {
        Speech.Speak();
    }
}

-- ISpeak is the abstraction that bot Dog and Cat has to implement -- Decoupled Dog and Cat classes by introducing a bridge "Animal" that is composed of ISpeak -- Dog and Cat classes extend Animal class and thus are decoupled from ISpeak.

Hope this clarifies

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