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We are planning to start a new asp.net web based application in a few weeks. We have three members in our team all with experience in asp.net 2.0

We are jumping direct from asp.net 2.0 to 4.0 (skipping 3.5) and we were discussing, should we go for asp.net 4.0 webforms or should we learn/develop in asp.net MVC? However, we don't have any prior MVC experience.

If you guys think that MVC is the way to go then please recommend good books using C#.

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What is the application about, in broad strokes. There are applications where ASP.NET is best and some where it is better to use MVC. There is no one perfect solution for all problems. –  James Black Jul 11 '10 at 15:25
    
its a gone a be something like portal.. lots of things will be added by the time. some thing like , job site, classified ads, price comparison, forum, etc –  jaco Jul 11 '10 at 15:29
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4 Answers

As with all engineering decisions, it depends.

Is your timeline long enough that you can ride the learning curve? Is everyone OK with learning MVC, or are you going to get blowback? Does your team know and understand HTML and CSS? I know this seems like a silly question, but a lot of ASP.NET WebForms programmers get by without really understanding the concepts for quite some time.

Do you want to make pervasive use of Ajax and CSS? Does anyone know JQuery or one of the other JS frameworks and want to make the best of them? Is unit testing important to you?

If the answers to these questions are, in general, "yes", then I would recommend taking the plunge and going for ASP.NET MVC over WebForms. As far as a book goes, I'll leave that to others. I still have not found a book that I really like yet.

I know that I'm pretty much an exclusive ASP.NET MVC programmer for new projects going forward. IMO WebForms is a broken and outdated model. Viewstate is painful for developers and web services, and postbacks are painful for users.

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Viewstate and eventvalidation is THE HURT LOCKER. –  Incognito Jul 11 '10 at 15:37
    
some of the answers and no and most of them are yes. we have understanding of html and css but we dont write them in our current project instead we use visual studio built in controls. one of the most important thing will be in our new project is ajax based development. we have used ajax in our current but not that much. none of us have experiencing with writing jquery scripts we will be suing visual studio 2010 –  jaco Jul 11 '10 at 16:11
    
I would take the plunge, but really spend some time delving into CSS. Chances are that if you have been working with the WebForms designer you really don't know it as well as you think you do. Here's your litmus test: If you plan to lay out your forms using tables, you need to read up on CSS. Have fun! –  Dave Markle Jul 11 '10 at 16:49
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If you are comfortable with and know Web Forms well, use those.

Generally, use the tool you are most comfortable with.

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My suggestion is: if you are tight scheduled and development team is experienced with web forms 2.0, your choose should be web form. It is nothing so serious happend between 2.0 and 4.0 that you might loose competence. Web forms still web forms.

If you have month or so as buffer to get in into MVC, you should do that. It is more natural for web development, and what I like - more testable.

I'm personally not to quick to rewrite my applications on MVC 2.0, and even start new project with MVC.. Maybe I wait for 3.0 version :)

A lot of information is here: http://www.asp.net/mvc

A also got sources of Mvs2inaction (please google for Mvc2inaction and be pointed to github site)

And sure you have to check Phil Haack blog.

(sorry could not post a lot of links yet))

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some of the answers and no and most of them are yes. we have understanding of html and css but we dont write them in our current project instead we use visual studio built in controls. one of the most important thing will be in our new project is ajax based development. we have used ajax in our current but not that much. none of us have experiencing with writing jquery scripts we will be suing visual studio 2010 –  jaco Jul 11 '10 at 16:11
    
as you are going to work more with ajax, that means you'll be focusing more on client side programming. Web forms is about server controls. As not of a lot of server controls you going to use, it actually does not really matter what to choose.. but be focused more on jQuery, CSS, HTML, Web Services. –  alexanderb Jul 11 '10 at 17:31
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As others have answered already about what to choose between Web Forms and MVC, if you have decided to go for MVC you can find book recommendation in following links -

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1281726/good-asp-net-mvc-vb-books (Although the questions is about VB books but answers are for both)

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1942068/best-resources-books-for-asp-net-mvc-framework-closed

Also I would like to recommend one new book which I have just started to read. This is good for understanding the concepts and compares Web Forms and MVC.

Programming Microsoft ASP.NET MVC - Dino Esposito

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