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I'm wondering about the cost of using a try/exception to handle nulls compared to using an if statement to check for nulls first.

To provide more information. There's a > 50% chance of getting nulls, because in this app. it is common to have a null if no data has been entered... so to attempt a calculation using a null is commonplace.

This being said, would it improve performance if I use an if statement to check for null first before calculation and just not attempt the calculation in the first place, or is less expensive to just let the exception be thrown and handle it?

thanks for any suggestions :-)

Thanks for great thought provoking feedback! Here's a PSEUDOcode example to clarify the original question:

BigDecimal value1 = null //assume value1 came from DB as null
BigDecimal divisor = new BigDecimal("2.0");

try{
    if(value1 != null){ //does this enhance performance?... >50% chance that value1 WILL be null
        value1.divide(divisor);
    }
}
catch (Exception e){
    //process, log etc. the exception
    //do this EVERYTIME I get null... or use an if statement
    //to capture other exceptions.
}
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1  
ack... don't catch Exception... what if divisor is ZERO? Then you will also catch the ArithmeticException from the divide by zero but treat at as the "expected" NullPointerException. Be as specific about exceptions you want to catch as possible. –  TofuBeer Jul 11 '10 at 21:27
    
Does anyone want to stick their neck out and say that an if statement is less expensive than an exception being thrown? –  AJay Jul 12 '10 at 0:50
    
Yes, I do. An 'if' statement is much less expensive than an exception being thrown. –  EJP Jul 12 '10 at 6:37
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5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

I'd recommend checking for null and not doing the calculation rather than throwing an exception.

An exception should be "exceptional" and rare, not a way to manage flow of control.

I'd also suggest that you establish a contract with your clients regarding input parameters. If nulls are allowed spell it out; if they're not, make it clear what should be passed, default values, and what you promise to return if a null value is passed.

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Absolutely truly –  odiszapc Sep 18 '13 at 10:22
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If passing null argument is an exceptional case, then I'd throw a NullPointerException.

public Result calculate(Input input) {
    if (input == null) throw new NullPointerException("input");
    // ...
}

If passing null is an allowed case, then I'd skip the calculation and eventually return null. But that makes in my opinion less sense. Passing null in first instance would seem a bug in the calling code.

Whatever way you choose, it should be properly documented in the Javadoc to avoid surprises for the API user.

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1  
In this case, if you haven't documented that it's acceptable for input to be supplied as null, I'd throw IllegalArgumentException rather than NullPointerException. I interpret NullPointerException to be analogous to a segmentation fault: something the host runtime detects as a programming error, not something used by the application itself. Against my own advice, the JDK documentation reads, "Applications should throw instances of this class to indicate other illegal uses of the null object." java.sun.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/lang/… –  seh Jul 11 '10 at 16:51
1  
@seh: Effective Java 2nd Edition claims that NullPointerException is the convention for illegal null argument. –  polygenelubricants Jul 11 '10 at 17:02
1  
@seh: IllegalArgumentException is only applicable for an illegal argument which is not null. Edit: as @poly said, yes :) Peek around in the Java SE/EE API's, you'll see that this convention applies there as well. –  BalusC Jul 11 '10 at 17:03
    
Thanks for great thought provoking feedback! Here's a PSEUDOcode example to clarify the original question: BigDecimal value1 = null //assume value1 came from DB as null BigDecimal divisor = new BigDecimal("2.0"); try{ if(value1 != null){ //does this enhance performance? // >50% chance that value1 WILL be null value1.divide(divisor); } } catch (Exception e){ //process, log etc. the exception //do this EVERYTIME I get null... or use an if statement //to capture other exceptions. } –  AJay Jul 11 '10 at 18:53
    
If the to be passed in argument is null, then just don't call the whole method. if (input != null) { result = calculate(input); } –  BalusC Jul 11 '10 at 21:47
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If there's a >50% chance of getting a null, then it's hardly an exception?

Personally, I'd say that if you expect something to happen, you should code for it appropriately - in this case, checking for null and doing whatever is appropriate. I've always understood throwing an exception to not be exceedingly cheap, but couldn't say for certain.

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Try and catch are close to "free" but throws can be very expensive. Typically VM creators do not optimize exception paths since, well, they are exceptional (supposed to be rare).

NullPointerException indicates a programmer mistake (RuntimeException) and should not be caught. Instead of catching the NullPointerException you should fix your code to cause the exception not to be thrown in the first place.

Worse yet, if you catch the NullPointerException and a different part of the calculation code throws NullPointerException than the one you expect to throw it you have now masked a bug.

To fully answer your question, I would implement it one way, profile it, and then implement it the other way and profile it... then I would only use the one with the if statement that avoids throwing the NullPointerException regardless of which is faster simply because of the point above.

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I agree with most of the other responses that you should prefer the null check to the try-catch. And I've upvoted some of them.

But you should try to avoid the need as much as possible.

There's a > 50% chance of getting nulls, because in this app. it is common to have a null if no data has been entered... so to attempt a calculation using a null is commonplace.

That's what you should really be fixing.

Come up with sensible default values that ensure the computation works or avoid calling a computation without supplying the needed input data.

For many of the standard data types and computations involving them there are sensible default values. Default numbers to 0 or 1 depending on their meaning, default strings and collections to empty, and many computations just work. For more complex objects of your own making, consider the Null Object pattern.

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