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I feel that it should be something very simple and obvious but just stuck on this for the last half an hour and can't move on.

All I need is to split an array of elements into N groups based on element index.

For example we have an array of 30 elements [e1,e2,...e30], that has to be divided into N=3 groups like this:

group1: [e1, ..., e10]
group2: [e11, ..., e20]
group3: [e21, ..., e30]

I came up with nasty mess like this for N=3 (pseudo language, I left multiplication on 0 and 1 just for clarification):

for(i=0;i<array_size;i++) {
   if(i>=0*(array_size/3) && i<1*(array_size/3) {
      print "group1";
   } else if(i>=1*(array_size/3) && i<2*(array_size/3) {
      print "group2";
   } else if(i>=2*(array_size/3) && i<3*(array_size/3)
      print "group3";
   }
}

But what would be the proper general solution?

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
The most important lesson from this question is that boundary conditions, short (artificial) deadlines, and lack of unit testing are a deadly combination. –  Adam Liss Nov 27 '08 at 2:23
1  
what exactly did you want to do: split into 3 smaller arrays, or print "groupI" 30 times ? –  blabla999 Jan 13 '09 at 20:35

9 Answers 9

up vote 8 down vote accepted

What about something like this?

for(i=0;i<array_size;i++) {
  print "group" + (Math.floor(i/(array_size/N)) + 1)
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, the shortest one and no additional variables. –  serg Nov 26 '08 at 22:54
    
Let array_size = 8 and N = 3. Since integer math gives 8/3 = 2, the the "3" groups are {0,1}, {2,3}, {3,4}, {6,7}. –  Adam Liss Nov 27 '08 at 2:19
    
Yeah, it should look like this: Math.floor(i/Math.ceil(array_size/N)) + 1 –  serg Nov 27 '08 at 2:35
1  
Leave off the +1 on the end if you're indexing into an array of values like I was :) –  davertron Dec 18 '12 at 18:28

Here's a little function which will do what you want - it presumes you know the number of groups you want to make:

function arrayToGroups(source, groups) {  

                     //This is the array of groups to return:
                     var grouped = [];

                     //work out the size of the group
                     groupSize = Math.ceil(source.length/groups);

                     //clone the source array so we can safely splice it
                     var queue = source;

                     for (var r=0;r<groups;r++) {
                       //Grab the next groupful from the queue, and append it to the array of groups
                       grouped.push(queue.splice(0, groupSize));    		
                     }       
             return grouped;
}

And you use it like:

var herbs = ['basil', 'marjoram', 'aniseed', 'parsely', 'chives', 'sage', 'fennel', 'oregano', 'thyme', 'tarragon', 'rosemary'];

var herbGroups = arrayToGroups(herbs, 3);

which returns:

herbGroups[0] = ['basil', 'marjoram', 'aniseed', 'parsely']
herbGroups[1] = ['chives', 'sage', 'fennel', 'oregano']
herbGroups[2] = ['thyme', 'tarragon', 'rosemary']

It doesn't do any sanity checking to make sure you pass in an array and a number, but you could add that easily enough. You could probably prototype it into the Javascript's object type, too, which would give you a handy 'toGroups' method on Arrays.

share|improve this answer
    
I was looking for a way to unflatten an array and I thought your use of splice was ingenious. (Actual use case is to pass an array of sets of coordinates though an intermediate API which only allows an array). –  Neil Feb 21 '13 at 10:42
    
Thanks, Neil! Glad to help - I'd completely forgotten about this one. –  Beejamin Feb 25 '13 at 13:21

I modified Beejamin's function above and just wanted to share it.

function arrayToGroups($source, $pergroup) {  
    $grouped = array();
    $groupCount = ceil(count($source)/$pergroup);
    $queue = $source;
    for ($r=0; $r<$groupCount; $r++) {
        array_push($grouped, array_splice($queue, 0, $pergroup));    
    }       
    return $grouped;
}

This asks how many items to have per group instead of how many groups total. PHP.

share|improve this answer
 const int g = 3;                      // number of groups
 const int n = (array_size + g - 1)/g; // elements per group

 for (i=0,j=1; i<array_size; ++i) {
    if (i > j*n)
        ++j;
     printf("Group %d\n", j);
 }
share|improve this answer
int group[3][10];
int groupIndex = 0;
int itemIndex = 0;
for(i = 0; i < array_size; i++)
{
    group[groupIndex][itemIndex] = big_array[i];
    itemIndex++;
    if (itemIndex == 10)
    {
        itemIndex = 0;
        groupIndex++;   
    }
}
share|improve this answer

There's probably an infinite number of ways of do this. I'd suggest: for each group, create a base pointer and count.

struct group {foo * ptr; size_t count };
group * pgroups = new group [ngroups];
size_t objects_per_group = array_size / ngroups;
for (unsigned u = 0; u < ngroups; ++u ) {
   group & g =  pgroups[u];
   size_t index = u * objects_per_group;
   g.ptr = & array [index];
   g.count = min (objects_per_group, array_size - index);  // last group may have less!
}
...`
for (unsigned u = 0; u < ngroups; ++u) {
   // group "g" is an array at pgroups[g].ptr, dimension pgroups[g].count
   group & g =  pgroups[u];
   // enumerate the group:
   for (unsigned v = 0; v < g.count; ++v) {
      fprintf (stdout, "group %u, item %u, %s\n",
         (unsigned) u, (unsigned) v, (const char *) g.ptr[v]->somestring);
}  }

delete[] pgroups;
share|improve this answer

Using a vector language makes this task simple, right tool and all that. Just thought I'd throw this out there to let folks check out an alternative methodology.

The explained version in K (an APL descendent):

split:{[values;n]    / define function split with two parameters
  enum:!n            / ! does enumerate from 0 through n exclusive, : is assign
  floor:_(#values)%n / 33 for this sample, % is divide, _ floor, # count
  cut:floor*enum     / 0 33 66 for this sample data, * multiplies atom * vector
  :cut _ values      / cut the values at the given cutpoints, yielding #cut lists
  }

values:1+!30           / generate values 1 through 30
n:3                    / how many groups to split into
groups:split[values;n] / set the groups

yields the expected output:

(1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30)

The short version in K :

split:{((_(#x)%y)*!y)_ x}
groups:split[1+!30;3]

yields the same output:

(1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30)
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for originality and comments, wish I could give you +10 for VALIDATING THE OUTPUT! –  Adam Liss Nov 27 '08 at 2:29

I think the problem is a little more complicated; and considering that your only look at group as a 1 dimensional problem your going to get a very odd view of what groups actually are.

Firstly the problem is dimensional according to the number of group primes, and group combinations you are dealing with. In Mathematics; this is represented as n to the power of n or n^n which can be translated to !n (factor of n).

If I have 5 groups arrayed as (1, 2, 3, 4, 5) then I wanted to represent it as certain groups or combonations of groups according to a factorial expression then the combonations get bigger

Group 1x1 = 1,2,3,4,5
Group 2x1 = 12, 23, 45, 13, 14, 15, 21, 24, 25, 31, 32, 34, 35, 41, 42, 43, 45, 51, 52, 53, 54
so the strategy creates a branch systematic branch (easy enough)
12, 13, 14, 15
21, 22, 23, 24
31, 32, 34, 35
41, 42, 43, 45
51, 52, 53, 55
Group 1 + 2x2x1 = (1, 23, 45), (2, 13, 45), (3, 12, 45), (4, 12, 35), (1, 24, 35), (1, 25, 35), (1, 32, 45), (1, 34, 25), (1, 35, 24), ... etc

As you can see when you begin to add factorial sets the comboniations become not so easy to create a mathematic reference to express the terms. It gets worst when you get up into a base set > 3 or 4 length.

If I am understanding your question: you want to expressing in a generic terms an algorythm which allows you to create grouping strategies programmatically?

This is a complicated set; and is represented best in calculus; as set theory. Otherwise all your doing is a two dimensional array handling.

the first Array expresses the grouping strategy; the second Array expresses the grouping elements.

I don't think this is what your being asked to do, because the term "GROUP" in mathematics has a very specific allocation for the term. You should not use the term group; rather express it as a set; set1, set2 if that is what you are doing.

Set1 contains elements of set2; and therefor this is handled with the same mathematics as Sets and unions are expressed. Lookup "Vin Diagrams" and "Union"; avoid using the term group unless you are representing the factor of a set.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Group_(mathematics)

I think what you are trying to express is the groups within a known set or table; This is on the wikipedia.org example D2.

In which case that means you have to look at the problem like a rubik's cube; and it gets complicated.

I'm working the same problem in javascript; when I am done I might publish it ;). It's very complicated.

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http://mathworld.wolfram.com/Permutation.html

To Add to what I was saying; here is the Equation to represent permutations of grouping orders.

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