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I am learning Python (2.7) and to test what I have learned so far I wrote a temperature converter that converts Celsius to Fahrenheit and I wanted to know if my code could be written better to be faster or something more Pythonic. And could someone tell me if there is an actual name for the if __name__ == '__main__': main() (out of curiosity)?

from sys import argv, exit # import argv and exit functions

def to_f(c): # Convert celsius to ferinheight
    temp = (c * 9/5) + 32
    return temp

def to_c(f): # Convert ferinheight to celsius
    temp = (f - 32) * 5/9
    return temp

def main():
    args = argv[1:] # Creates an argument list omitting the omitting the [0] element
    if len(argv) < 2: exit(1) # If less than two arguments
    if args[0] == '-f': # If the first argument is -f
        print args[1], 'ferinheight is', str(to_c(int(args[1]))), 'celsius'
    elif args[0] == '-c': # If the first argument is -c
        print args[1], 'celsius is', str(to_f(int(args[1]))), 'ferinheight'
    else: exit(1)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()

http://pastebin.com/rjeNikDt

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4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted
import sys

def to_f(c): # Convert celsius to fahrenheit
    return (c * 9/5) + 32

def to_c(f): # Convert fahrenheit to celsius
    return (f - 32) * 5/9

def convert(args):
    if len(args) < 2:
        return 1 # If less than two arguments
    t = args[1]
    if args[0] == '-f': # If the first argument is -f
        print "%s Fahrenheit is %s Celsius" % (t, to_c(int(t)))
        return 0
    elif args[0] == '-c': # If the first argument is -c
        print "%s Celsius is %s Fahrenheit" % (t, to_f(int(t)))
        return 0
    else:
        return 1

if __name__ == '__main__':
    sys.exit(convert(sys.argv[1:]))

What I did:

  1. Changed the name of main() to convert()
  2. Pass the arguments to convert() explicitly
  3. Change calls to exit() to returns, and call exit() in the main clause.
  4. You were checking argv for length 2, when you should have been checking args.
  5. The to_c and to_f functions don't need a temp variable, just return the expression.
  6. Although others are right that you can just put the main() function at the top level, it is good form to use the if __name__ style, so that you could import this module and use the functions in other code.
  7. String formatting is nicer than intermixing strings and values in the print statement.
  8. args[1] appears enough that I assigned it to t for brevity.
  9. I prefer importing sys, and using sys.argv, for example.
  10. I always put dependent clauses on new lines, never if blah: doit()
  11. Fix the spelling of Fahrenheit
share|improve this answer
    
You sir have just earned your self an accepted answer, thank you! And thanks for the Fahrenheit spelling fix, I suck at spelling and Chrome, Google, Komodo Edit, and After the Deadline (Chrome advanced spell checker extension) were all telling me it is spelled wrong but none of them knew what word I was trying to spell. –  Dr Hydralisk Jul 11 '10 at 20:21
    
And could you explain how sys.exit(convert(sys.argv[1:])) works? It will do that before it exits which it does because there is nothing else to execute? –  Dr Hydralisk Jul 11 '10 at 20:28
    
convert() takes an argument list, which I provide with sys.argv[1:]. convert() then returns a status code, which is passed to sys.exit, which exits the process with that status code. –  Ned Batchelder Jul 11 '10 at 20:34
    
5 / 9 would be equal to 0, wouldn't be? It's diferent in python 2.7? –  razpeitia Jul 11 '10 at 20:51
1  
5/9 would be 0, but the expression is (f-32)*5/9, which is equivalent to ((f-32)*5)/9. –  Ned Batchelder Jul 11 '10 at 20:53

The if __name__ == '__main__': pattern is for when you're writing a module intended to be used by other code, but you want some testing code in the module.

If you run the module directly, it runs the stuff in that if block. If it's imported from somewhere else, it doesn't.

So, I would recommend keeping that if __name__ == '__main__': block because you can do something like:

from temp_conv import c_from_f
print c_from_f(73)

later in another piece of code if you named this temp_conv.py.

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Thanks, he confused me a little because I clearly remembered reading that is what that if statement is there for. –  Dr Hydralisk Jul 11 '10 at 20:17

A couple of improvements on Ned's answer. In Python2.7 / still truncates the result by default, so you need to import division from __future__ otherwise (c * 9/5) + 32 always rounds down which leads to reduced accuracy.
eg if 36C is 96.8F it's better to return 97 than 96

You don't need a return statement in convert. By default None is returned. If there is a problem you can raise an exception

Also using "".format() is preferred nowdays

A further improvement would be to use optparse or similar to process the command arguments, but may be overkill for such a simple program

from __future__ import division
import sys

def to_f(c): # Convert celsius to fahrenheit
    return (c * 9/5) + 32

def to_c(f): # Convert fahrenheit to celsius
    return (f - 32) * 5/9

def convert(args):
    if len(args) != 2:
        raise RuntimeError("List of two elememts required")
    t = int(args[1])
    if args[0] == '-f': # If the first argument is -f
        print "{0} Fahrenheit is {1} Celsius".format(t, round(to_c(t)))
    elif args[0] == '-c': # If the first argument is -c
        print "{0} Celsius is {1} Fahrenheit".format(t, round(to_f(t)))
    else:
        raise RuntimeError("First element should be -c or -f")

if __name__ == '__main__':
    sys.exit(convert(sys.argv[1:]))
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the fix with the division, I did notice it was a little off. –  Dr Hydralisk Jul 12 '10 at 0:35
    
And just for people who may be reading this in the future, you do not need to import the division module, you can just (c * 9.0/5.0) and (f - 32) * 5.0/9.0 –  Dr Hydralisk Jul 12 '10 at 1:46
1  
@Dr Hydralisk, It's still a good idea to import division from __future__ as the behaviour of / changes in Python3. If you want to make sure to do integer division when the code is run with Python3 use the // operator. Then the code will work the same in Python2 and Python3 –  John La Rooy Jul 12 '10 at 6:19
import sys
from getopt import getopt, GetoptError

def to_f(c):
  return (c*9/5) + 32

def to_c(f):
  return (f-32) * 5/9

def usage():
  print "usage:\n\tconvert [-f|-c] temp"

def convert(args):
  opts = None
  try:
    opts, args = getopt(args, "f:c:")
  except GetoptError as e:
    print e

  if not opts or len(opts) != 1:
    usage()
    return 1

  converters = {
    '-f': (to_c, '{0} Fahrenheit is {1} Celsius'),
    '-c': (to_f, '{0} Celsius is {1} Fahrenheit')
  }

  # opts will be [('-f', '123')] or [('-c', '123')]
  scale, temp = opts[0][0], int(opts[0][1])
  converter = converters[scale][0]
  output = converters[scale][1]

  print output.format(temp, converter(temp))
  return 0

if __name__ == '__main__':
    sys.exit(convert(sys.argv[1:]))

I used getopt to clean up your argument and error handling. I also consolidated the logic that acts upon the given option, once that option has been determined. Getopt is a very powerful option parser and I think it's worth learning if you are going to be writing these sorts of programs often.

share|improve this answer
    
Looks more complicated than it needs to be, my head hurts. –  Dr Hydralisk Jul 12 '10 at 0:33
    
Really? Which part? I guess it could be confusing if you haven't used getopt. –  Jesse Dhillon Jul 12 '10 at 1:08

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